Do you trust Pizza Hut?

13

Replies

  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 12,548 Member
    I don't eat pizza that often anymore, and when I do, it's not from a chain. Totally not worth it! I remember a few years ago there was a big hubub about the Hut and their "veggie lovers' pizza." They SUGGESTED it did not have meat; however, the crust is made with beef tallow. Kind of pissed some people off. Whatever.

    There's a grocery store in town that makes pretty decent pizza by the slice, and sometimes I go to a local pizzeria for a custom slice. The former are pre-made, and the latter my favorite ingredients are roasted red potato + caramelized onions + bacon. It's the stuffed potato pie!

    I found an entry in the database for a slice of pizza. It's 300 calories. Kind of surprised me at first, but it seems to fit when I eat it. That said, the one I get from the pizzeria is by far WAY more than that. It's such a rarity, I don't worry too much about it; I just call it a slice o' pie and log three hundred.

    Now I want pizza.

    My struggle with the database is.... bagels. So many entries, and I have no good idea what the truth is with respect to my local shop. I made a reasonable guess. I have a bagel once or twice a week, so it's more often than pizza.

    Good luck!
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    edited January 2020
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    But this thread isn't about the quality of various pizza places. It's very specifically about the calories in Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza (from a New Zealand Pizza Hut store, which may or may not make some difference), and whether the nutritional information provided can be trusted (we've now established that it seems decidedly dodgy).

    Where to get the best pizza is an entirely different topic.

    See at least three of the posts above mine (including one of the OP's).
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    But this thread isn't about the quality of various pizza places. It's very specifically about the calories in Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza (from a New Zealand Pizza Hut store, which may or may not make some difference), and whether the nutritional information provided can be trusted (we've now established that it seems decidedly dodgy).

    Where to get the best pizza is an entirely different topic.

    See at least three of the posts above mine (including one of the OP's).

    You mean this post from the OP? I'd say she shares the same sentiment.
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Thank you for that insight. Really helped the conversation.

    Was there sarcasm that I just didn't read into it? Sarcasm online is unideal in the best of times. (And now we're actually off topic).
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 12,548 Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    Apologies for taking this a little off track... but not THAT sorry.

    @aokoye - if you're in PDX, I'm sure you've been to Sizzle Pie. I've been to their EUG location. Tasty, but the ambiance is too loud. Ken's Artisan Bakery is where I discovered macarons. I need to stay out of that place.

    When I worked in a local pizza restaurant (sadly now defunct after 40 years), the dough was hand-made daily. It was made the day before the crusts were rolled out so it could do its first rise thing. Secret ingredients included finely shredded onion. Oh dear lord it was good, even the whole wheat crust. Such a fun restaurant, and GREAT pizza but I swear that 300 calories I'm using for my eating pizza wouldn't have touched that stuff. Cured meats, sure; preservatives. All our vegetables were prepped on site. That was my job. I only worked there a couple years and never "graduated" to pizza cook. I was a salad and sandwich guy, but I helped build pies when time allowed. There was just ONE guy who made the dough. Quite a character. I'm sure he's long deceased by now. He used to like to say he was rolling in dough. Memories!
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    edited January 2020
    kimny72 wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    But this thread isn't about the quality of various pizza places. It's very specifically about the calories in Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza (from a New Zealand Pizza Hut store, which may or may not make some difference), and whether the nutritional information provided can be trusted (we've now established that it seems decidedly dodgy).

    Where to get the best pizza is an entirely different topic.

    See at least three of the posts above mine (including one of the OP's).

    You mean this post from the OP? I'd say she shares the same sentiment.
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Thank you for that insight. Really helped the conversation.

    Was there sarcasm that I just didn't read into it? Sarcasm online is unideal in the best of times. (And now we're actually off topic).

    I feel confident that reply was dripping with sarcasm. The correct answer to "How many cals in Pizza Hut" is not judging OPs choice if pizza.

    Not everyone has good local pizza nearby. And sometimes, you just want someone to deliver tasty food in the shape of a pizza to your door.

    OP, I believe pizza cals are always a guess. There are several calorie dense ingredients and even at a chain, I'd bet the proportions depend on the person putting it together. I'd look at a bunch of different chains entries from your part of the world and toppings and pick the highest. The figure on their website does seem a little low to me.

    Even if it was dripping in sarcasm, the first part of my reply still stands - I was what, third in the line of non-pizza hut calorie related replies? Why reply to mine? And in case it wasn't clear, I don't really care what people like or don't like with regards to food - my choice in pizza isn't somehow worse or better, from a universal judgment standpoint, than someone else's.

    edit: also had I read sarcasm into the OP's reply, I wouldn't have posted (not including the pita bit from last night).
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    Apologies for taking this a little off track... but not THAT sorry.

    @aokoye - if you're in PDX, I'm sure you've been to Sizzle Pie. I've been to their EUG location. Tasty, but the ambiance is too loud. Ken's Artisan Bakery is where I discovered macarons. I need to stay out of that place.

    When I worked in a local pizza restaurant (sadly now defunct after 40 years), the dough was hand-made daily. It was made the day before the crusts were rolled out so it could do its first rise thing. Secret ingredients included finely shredded onion. Oh dear lord it was good, even the whole wheat crust. Such a fun restaurant, and GREAT pizza but I swear that 300 calories I'm using for my eating pizza wouldn't have touched that stuff. Cured meats, sure; preservatives. All our vegetables were prepped on site. That was my job. I only worked there a couple years and never "graduated" to pizza cook. I was a salad and sandwich guy, but I helped build pies when time allowed. There was just ONE guy who made the dough. Quite a character. I'm sure he's long deceased by now. He used to like to say he was rolling in dough. Memories!

    I have been to Sizzle Pie! My weird cheese pickiness means that I rarely get pizza there though (I don't like cheese very much/don't like it in most situations - pizza is the only real reason I tried to get myself to like cheese). I suspect the E Burnside location isn't too loud and the W Burnside one is really an issue of when you go, though I haven't been there in a while. I do like some of their vegan pizzas and they also apparently have very good salads. Ken's is great though. I'm meeting a friend at their bakery tomorrow morning and wouldn't be shocked if I end up going over my calories for the day.

    Back on the calories topic, another local, not NZ, pizza chain lists their calories for a slice of pepperoni pizza as 249 calories per "medium" slice, by which I'm assuming 1 slice of a 12 inch pizza (though I don't know if they're sliced into 8 or 6 slices nor the weight). The other thing is that the weight is going to be affected by the humidity, though I have no idea by how much. There's also a question of how much oil they're putting in the dough and how thick they're rolling it for a given circumference.
  • Avidkeo
    Avidkeo Posts: 3,190 Member
    edited January 2020
    kimny72 wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    But this thread isn't about the quality of various pizza places. It's very specifically about the calories in Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza (from a New Zealand Pizza Hut store, which may or may not make some difference), and whether the nutritional information provided can be trusted (we've now established that it seems decidedly dodgy).

    Where to get the best pizza is an entirely different topic.

    See at least three of the posts above mine (including one of the OP's).

    You mean this post from the OP? I'd say she shares the same sentiment.
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Thank you for that insight. Really helped the conversation.

    Was there sarcasm that I just didn't read into it? Sarcasm online is unideal in the best of times. (And now we're actually off topic).

    I feel confident that reply was dripping with sarcasm. The correct answer to "How many cals in Pizza Hut" is not judging OPs choice if pizza.

    Not everyone has good local pizza nearby. And sometimes, you just want someone to deliver tasty food in the shape of a pizza to your door.

    OP, I believe pizza cals are always a guess. There are several calorie dense ingredients and even at a chain, I'd bet the proportions depend on the person putting it together. I'd look at a bunch of different chains entries from your part of the world and toppings and pick the highest. The figure on their website does seem a little low to me.

    Your sarcasm meter is on point. I believe that what I used was about 11 sarcasm, on a scale of 1 - 10.

    Sadly in NZ, especially provincial NZ where I live, "mum and pop" pizza places don't really exist.

    This is not a question on quality. It's a question about accuracy of calories.

    Oh and to respond to your question as to why I was sarcastic to your post and not the other "I prefer x pizza" is at least those replies also included information related to the original question, and not post to simply comment on my taste in Pizza. For the record, I prefer a local brand called Hells Pizza, particularly their Lust variety, though their Gluttony one is also really good. But my kids don't eat it.

    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.
  • PAV8888
    PAV8888 Posts: 13,210 Member
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.

    Hey! Let's not all be TOO hasty here! I've learned of at least a couple of pizza places I might want to try out if I ever find myself in Portland! And that's far less unlikely than you and Nony finding yourself there. Well, unless Nony comes to visit and we decide to do some southern driving! But, that's another story!!! :lol:
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    edited January 2020
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    But this thread isn't about the quality of various pizza places. It's very specifically about the calories in Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza (from a New Zealand Pizza Hut store, which may or may not make some difference), and whether the nutritional information provided can be trusted (we've now established that it seems decidedly dodgy).

    Where to get the best pizza is an entirely different topic.

    See at least three of the posts above mine (including one of the OP's).

    You mean this post from the OP? I'd say she shares the same sentiment.
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Thank you for that insight. Really helped the conversation.

    Was there sarcasm that I just didn't read into it? Sarcasm online is unideal in the best of times. (And now we're actually off topic).

    I feel confident that reply was dripping with sarcasm. The correct answer to "How many cals in Pizza Hut" is not judging OPs choice if pizza.

    Not everyone has good local pizza nearby. And sometimes, you just want someone to deliver tasty food in the shape of a pizza to your door.

    OP, I believe pizza cals are always a guess. There are several calorie dense ingredients and even at a chain, I'd bet the proportions depend on the person putting it together. I'd look at a bunch of different chains entries from your part of the world and toppings and pick the highest. The figure on their website does seem a little low to me.

    Your sarcasm meter is on point. I believe that what I used was about 11 sarcasm, on a scale of 1 - 10.

    Sadly in NZ, especially provincial NZ where I live, "mum and pop" pizza places don't really exist.

    This is not a question on quality. It's a question about accuracy of calories.

    Oh and to respond to your question as to why I was sarcastic to your post and not the other "I prefer x pizza" is at least those replies also included information related to the original question, and not post to simply comment on my taste in Pizza. For the record, I prefer a local brand called Hells Pizza, particularly their Lust variety, though their Gluttony one is also really good. But my kids don't eat it.

    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.

    I don't think you replied to any of my posts that weren't about pita (and calories), but between sarcasm on the internet and the way threading of comments on this website works...
    But on the topic of calories, pizza, and pita, MFP calculates that the last time I made pita bread it was nearly 300 calories per piece. I don't remember what each pita weighed, but, like the pizza issue, the "wow that's a lot of calories" was likely a matter of thickness and oil. When I make pita it's thicker than anything I would typically find packaged. Most of that is because I really want there to be a pocket and rolling them as thin as the ones I can find packaged doesn't end up creating the texture and poofyness that I want given what I have available to me kitchen wise. I also may be using more oil than what's in what I can find packaged 3 tbsp of olive oil per X amount of flour and water (my recipe makes 8 pitas).

    For better or worse, Pizza Hut isn't going to tell us how much oil they're using in their dough. That said, a quick look in the pizza cookbook that's on my self and at one dough that I used to use all the time makes it seem as if it's not unusual to use significantly less oil in pizza dough compared to pita dough.

    edited to add a few words to make things make more sense
  • Nony_Mouse
    Nony_Mouse Posts: 5,646 Member
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    But this thread isn't about the quality of various pizza places. It's very specifically about the calories in Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza (from a New Zealand Pizza Hut store, which may or may not make some difference), and whether the nutritional information provided can be trusted (we've now established that it seems decidedly dodgy).

    Where to get the best pizza is an entirely different topic.

    See at least three of the posts above mine (including one of the OP's).

    You mean this post from the OP? I'd say she shares the same sentiment.
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Thank you for that insight. Really helped the conversation.

    Was there sarcasm that I just didn't read into it? Sarcasm online is unideal in the best of times. (And now we're actually off topic).

    I feel confident that reply was dripping with sarcasm. The correct answer to "How many cals in Pizza Hut" is not judging OPs choice if pizza.

    Not everyone has good local pizza nearby. And sometimes, you just want someone to deliver tasty food in the shape of a pizza to your door.

    OP, I believe pizza cals are always a guess. There are several calorie dense ingredients and even at a chain, I'd bet the proportions depend on the person putting it together. I'd look at a bunch of different chains entries from your part of the world and toppings and pick the highest. The figure on their website does seem a little low to me.

    Your sarcasm meter is on point. I believe that what I used was about 11 sarcasm, on a scale of 1 - 10.

    Sadly in NZ, especially provincial NZ where I live, "mum and pop" pizza places don't really exist.

    This is not a question on quality. It's a question about accuracy of calories.

    Oh and to respond to your question as to why I was sarcastic to your post and not the other "I prefer x pizza" is at least those replies also included information related to the original question, and not post to simply comment on my taste in Pizza. For the record, I prefer a local brand called Hells Pizza, particularly their Lust variety, though their Gluttony one is also really good. But my kids don't eat it.

    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.

    Limbo. No competition (admittedly, I've only ever tried the vegetarian pizzas). And I'm reasonably sure Hell is wasted on children.
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.

    Hey! Let's not all be TOO hasty here! I've learned of at least a couple of pizza places I might want to try out if I ever find myself in Portland! And that's far less unlikely than you and Nony finding yourself there. Well, unless Nony comes to visit and we decide to do some southern driving! But, that's another story!!! :lol:

    If it hadn't been for lack of funds and crappy health, I would have gone to a conference in Portland last year, and of course would have visited you! I will have to come up with another way to visit and still call it a business trip :p
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    But this thread isn't about the quality of various pizza places. It's very specifically about the calories in Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza (from a New Zealand Pizza Hut store, which may or may not make some difference), and whether the nutritional information provided can be trusted (we've now established that it seems decidedly dodgy).

    Where to get the best pizza is an entirely different topic.

    See at least three of the posts above mine (including one of the OP's).

    You mean this post from the OP? I'd say she shares the same sentiment.
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Thank you for that insight. Really helped the conversation.

    Was there sarcasm that I just didn't read into it? Sarcasm online is unideal in the best of times. (And now we're actually off topic).

    I feel confident that reply was dripping with sarcasm. The correct answer to "How many cals in Pizza Hut" is not judging OPs choice if pizza.

    Not everyone has good local pizza nearby. And sometimes, you just want someone to deliver tasty food in the shape of a pizza to your door.

    OP, I believe pizza cals are always a guess. There are several calorie dense ingredients and even at a chain, I'd bet the proportions depend on the person putting it together. I'd look at a bunch of different chains entries from your part of the world and toppings and pick the highest. The figure on their website does seem a little low to me.

    Your sarcasm meter is on point. I believe that what I used was about 11 sarcasm, on a scale of 1 - 10.

    Sadly in NZ, especially provincial NZ where I live, "mum and pop" pizza places don't really exist.

    This is not a question on quality. It's a question about accuracy of calories.

    Oh and to respond to your question as to why I was sarcastic to your post and not the other "I prefer x pizza" is at least those replies also included information related to the original question, and not post to simply comment on my taste in Pizza. For the record, I prefer a local brand called Hells Pizza, particularly their Lust variety, though their Gluttony one is also really good. But my kids don't eat it.

    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.

    Limbo. No competition (admittedly, I've only ever tried the vegetarian pizzas). And I'm reasonably sure Hell is wasted on children.
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.

    Hey! Let's not all be TOO hasty here! I've learned of at least a couple of pizza places I might want to try out if I ever find myself in Portland! And that's far less unlikely than you and Nony finding yourself there. Well, unless Nony comes to visit and we decide to do some southern driving! But, that's another story!!! :lol:

    If it hadn't been for lack of funds and crappy health, I would have gone to a conference in Portland last year, and of course would have visited you! I will have to come up with another way to visit and still call it a business trip :p

    One of these days I will get my way down to NZ. It's very high on my list of places I'd like to go, but it's also the most expensive flight (never mind my only actual phobia being flying - though that hasn't stopped me fly anywhere else). I suspect it will be needing to go to a conference that will take me there.
  • Nony_Mouse
    Nony_Mouse Posts: 5,646 Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Nony_Mouse wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Honestly this was my thought but my version was much more flippant. If I want good pizza, a national or multinational chain is not where I'm going to go looking for it (for what it's worth I also just don't like Pizza Hut, nor Dominos - I'll eat it when I have no other choice of food, but otherwise...). For fast and fairly inexpensive I go to my favorite local chain (Hot Lips for those of you in the Portland metro area), for really good and expensive I go Ken's Artisan Pizza (that's a twice a year thing), and then occasionally I'll also just make my own pizza, being happy that my oven runs hot by 10 degrees but knowing that it's not as hot as a dedicated home pizza oven.

    And mind you, some ingredients are going to be premade wherever you go and some will also have preservatives. Pizza dough isn't made the day of, cured meats have preservatives because that's now curing meat works, and cheese also fits in that category. If you have corn on your pizza year round then it would behove whomever is making it to use frozen corn in terms of taste when it's out of season, canned tomatoes go into sauces, etc. That said and as you implied, the way that local shops are sourcing, choosing, and using ingredients is very different to a multinational chain and you can taste it (unless the local place just isn't good).

    But this thread isn't about the quality of various pizza places. It's very specifically about the calories in Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza (from a New Zealand Pizza Hut store, which may or may not make some difference), and whether the nutritional information provided can be trusted (we've now established that it seems decidedly dodgy).

    Where to get the best pizza is an entirely different topic.

    See at least three of the posts above mine (including one of the OP's).

    You mean this post from the OP? I'd say she shares the same sentiment.
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    I think the local mom and pop pizzerias are better, the ingredients are fresh made. Pizza hut has a lot of frozen pre- made ingredients, including the dough. That means there's a lot of added preservatives and other things we may not be aware of. They also put a lot of oil in the the pans underneath the dough at pizza before cooking it, vs the local place which uses a screen or puts it directly in the oven , with no extra oil.

    Thank you for that insight. Really helped the conversation.

    Was there sarcasm that I just didn't read into it? Sarcasm online is unideal in the best of times. (And now we're actually off topic).

    I feel confident that reply was dripping with sarcasm. The correct answer to "How many cals in Pizza Hut" is not judging OPs choice if pizza.

    Not everyone has good local pizza nearby. And sometimes, you just want someone to deliver tasty food in the shape of a pizza to your door.

    OP, I believe pizza cals are always a guess. There are several calorie dense ingredients and even at a chain, I'd bet the proportions depend on the person putting it together. I'd look at a bunch of different chains entries from your part of the world and toppings and pick the highest. The figure on their website does seem a little low to me.

    Your sarcasm meter is on point. I believe that what I used was about 11 sarcasm, on a scale of 1 - 10.

    Sadly in NZ, especially provincial NZ where I live, "mum and pop" pizza places don't really exist.

    This is not a question on quality. It's a question about accuracy of calories.

    Oh and to respond to your question as to why I was sarcastic to your post and not the other "I prefer x pizza" is at least those replies also included information related to the original question, and not post to simply comment on my taste in Pizza. For the record, I prefer a local brand called Hells Pizza, particularly their Lust variety, though their Gluttony one is also really good. But my kids don't eat it.

    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.

    Limbo. No competition (admittedly, I've only ever tried the vegetarian pizzas). And I'm reasonably sure Hell is wasted on children.
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    So to the comments on quality, thanks but your comment was markedly unhelpful.

    Hey! Let's not all be TOO hasty here! I've learned of at least a couple of pizza places I might want to try out if I ever find myself in Portland! And that's far less unlikely than you and Nony finding yourself there. Well, unless Nony comes to visit and we decide to do some southern driving! But, that's another story!!! :lol:

    If it hadn't been for lack of funds and crappy health, I would have gone to a conference in Portland last year, and of course would have visited you! I will have to come up with another way to visit and still call it a business trip :p

    One of these days I will get my way down to NZ. It's very high on my list of places I'd like to go, but it's also the most expensive flight (never mind my only actual phobia being flying - though that hasn't stopped me fly anywhere else). I suspect it will be needing to go to a conference that will take me there.

    I won't lie, it's pretty awesome (just don't trust our Pizza Hut's nutritional info!).

    And sadly, equally expensive for us to get anywhere further than east coast of Australia or the Pacific Islands.
  • extra_medium
    extra_medium Posts: 1,525 Member
    I don't think it's a matter of trust as much as it is recognizing these have to be extreme estimations.. X grams of "pizza" could contain an infinite number of ratios of various toppings, crust, cheese and sauce. How could it possibly be accurate?
  • Momeri1113
    Momeri1113 Posts: 57 Member
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    So just had pizza for dinner, and I actually weighed my pizza before eating it. I had 2 slices (one regular size, one small) that weighed 93 grams.

    According to Pizza Hut, 100 grams of pepperoni Pizza is 190 calories.

    So my 2 slices were only 176 calories??

    Would you believe that?

    For the record, one slice is supposed to be 72 grams, and the small slice I was was the typical tiny slice. So I'd believe that the weights are the cooked weight.

    ETA this is where I got the nutrition information. We are talking about a pepperoni pan pizza. Maybe I read it wrong?

    https://www.pizzahut.co.nz/nutritional-content


    I'm in NZ. I've logged 2 slices at 183 calories per slice. Cause rather guess over than under

    Usually 1 small slice of pizza is like 300 calories so I find that incredibly inaccurate. It depends what is on it and how much bread honestly.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,330 Member
    Momeri1113 wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    So just had pizza for dinner, and I actually weighed my pizza before eating it. I had 2 slices (one regular size, one small) that weighed 93 grams.

    According to Pizza Hut, 100 grams of pepperoni Pizza is 190 calories.

    So my 2 slices were only 176 calories??

    Would you believe that?

    For the record, one slice is supposed to be 72 grams, and the small slice I was was the typical tiny slice. So I'd believe that the weights are the cooked weight.

    ETA this is where I got the nutrition information. We are talking about a pepperoni pan pizza. Maybe I read it wrong?

    https://www.pizzahut.co.nz/nutritional-content


    I'm in NZ. I've logged 2 slices at 183 calories per slice. Cause rather guess over than under

    Usually 1 small slice of pizza is like 300 calories so I find that incredibly inaccurate. It depends what is on it and how much bread honestly.

    Interesting. Here a medium is about 60-70 grams and 200 calories or less. Usually, 3 slices fit very comfortably into my diet with calories to spare.
  • Avidkeo
    Avidkeo Posts: 3,190 Member
    Momeri1113 wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    So just had pizza for dinner, and I actually weighed my pizza before eating it. I had 2 slices (one regular size, one small) that weighed 93 grams.

    According to Pizza Hut, 100 grams of pepperoni Pizza is 190 calories.

    So my 2 slices were only 176 calories??

    Would you believe that?

    For the record, one slice is supposed to be 72 grams, and the small slice I was was the typical tiny slice. So I'd believe that the weights are the cooked weight.

    ETA this is where I got the nutrition information. We are talking about a pepperoni pan pizza. Maybe I read it wrong?

    https://www.pizzahut.co.nz/nutritional-content


    I'm in NZ. I've logged 2 slices at 183 calories per slice. Cause rather guess over than under

    Usually 1 small slice of pizza is like 300 calories so I find that incredibly inaccurate. It depends what is on it and how much bread honestly.

    This depends on your definition of small. In NZ our Large pizza would probably be considered an extra small in the US given our large pizza is only 11"