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Thoughts on Beyond Burger and other fake meat

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  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,961Member Member Posts: 4,961Member Member
    In the spirit of today, an article on the subject of whether or not faux meat products are appropriate if one is avoiding meat for Lent: https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-beyond-impossible-burger-fake-meat-lent-20200225-ldbyyq74lzadzgmiqhcdaqmuo4-story.html

    Heh, I read the Trib and thought about linking that.
  • kimny72kimny72 Posts: 14,924Member Member Posts: 14,924Member Member
    In the spirit of today, an article on the subject of whether or not faux meat products are appropriate if one is avoiding meat for Lent: https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-beyond-impossible-burger-fake-meat-lent-20200225-ldbyyq74lzadzgmiqhcdaqmuo4-story.html

    Interesting. I think it really does depend on "why" you observe Lent or any other religious or spiritual fasting convention. Kind of a "letter of the law" vs "spirit of the law" sort of thing.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 22,165Member Member Posts: 22,165Member Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    In the spirit of today, an article on the subject of whether or not faux meat products are appropriate if one is avoiding meat for Lent: https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-beyond-impossible-burger-fake-meat-lent-20200225-ldbyyq74lzadzgmiqhcdaqmuo4-story.html

    Interesting. I think it really does depend on "why" you observe Lent or any other religious or spiritual fasting convention. Kind of a "letter of the law" vs "spirit of the law" sort of thing.

    Yeah, I can see if the point is to live mindfully through the practice of temporarily giving up something, then replacing it with something that is designed to be indistinguishable is kind of skirting the intention (not to degrade anyone's spiritual practice if they're doing this, there may be complexities I'm not getting).

    Obviously, there are fasting practices that have different purposes than Lent (as least Lent as I was raised to understand it) and faux meat may fit well into those.



  • SlayLikeAWarriorSlayLikeAWarrior Posts: 58Member Member Posts: 58Member Member
    Real meat eater here for life. Although, I do believe in moderation when it comes to eating red meat. Hell NO to fake meat! :D
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 22,165Member Member Posts: 22,165Member Member
    Real meat eater here for life. Although, I do believe in moderation when it comes to eating red meat. Hell NO to fake meat! :D

    Why? What is inherently objectionable about faux meat?
  • deannalfisherdeannalfisher Posts: 5,452Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,452Member, Premium Member
    Real meat eater here for life. Although, I do believe in moderation when it comes to eating red meat. Hell NO to fake meat! :D

    real meat eater here who also enjoys and appreciated beyond burgers etc (sister is a vegan and we try different restaurants when she visits)
    edited February 26
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,961Member Member Posts: 4,961Member Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    In the spirit of today, an article on the subject of whether or not faux meat products are appropriate if one is avoiding meat for Lent: https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-beyond-impossible-burger-fake-meat-lent-20200225-ldbyyq74lzadzgmiqhcdaqmuo4-story.html

    Interesting. I think it really does depend on "why" you observe Lent or any other religious or spiritual fasting convention. Kind of a "letter of the law" vs "spirit of the law" sort of thing.

    Yeah, I can see if the point is to live mindfully through the practice of temporarily giving up something, then replacing it with something that is designed to be indistinguishable is kind of skirting the intention (not to degrade anyone's spiritual practice if they're doing this, there may be complexities I'm not getting).

    Obviously, there are fasting practices that have different purposes than Lent (as least Lent as I was raised to understand it) and faux meat may fit well into those.



    It reminded me of jokes about people violating the spirit by having some fancy, expensive seafood based meal on a Friday in Lent, like going to a nice sushi place or having lobster.

    I would agree with the comment above that it depends on how one is understanding the sacrifice -- it can be "to have to be mindful that I am doing this and then remembering why" which I think would be consistent with having the Beyond Burger.
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Posts: 1,346Member Member Posts: 1,346Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    In the spirit of today, an article on the subject of whether or not faux meat products are appropriate if one is avoiding meat for Lent: https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-beyond-impossible-burger-fake-meat-lent-20200225-ldbyyq74lzadzgmiqhcdaqmuo4-story.html

    Interesting. I think it really does depend on "why" you observe Lent or any other religious or spiritual fasting convention. Kind of a "letter of the law" vs "spirit of the law" sort of thing.

    Yeah, I can see if the point is to live mindfully through the practice of temporarily giving up something, then replacing it with something that is designed to be indistinguishable is kind of skirting the intention (not to degrade anyone's spiritual practice if they're doing this, there may be complexities I'm not getting).

    Obviously, there are fasting practices that have different purposes than Lent (as least Lent as I was raised to understand it) and faux meat may fit well into those.



    It reminded me of jokes about people violating the spirit by having some fancy, expensive seafood based meal on a Friday in Lent, like going to a nice sushi place or having lobster.

    I would agree with the comment above that it depends on how one is understanding the sacrifice -- it can be "to have to be mindful that I am doing this and then remembering why" which I think would be consistent with having the Beyond Burger.

    Yeah, when I was a kid, I was allergic to fish, so on Fridays during Lent we would have things like shrimp or cheese pizza. These were treats and we looked forward to them, which does kind of defeat the purpose of a "sacrifice".

    I also remember as a kid thinking that vegetarians should HAVE to eat meat on Fridays during Lent as their sacrifice. :D
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,521Member Member Posts: 5,521Member Member
    Given the original purpose of giving things up for Lent was to eat simply and cheaply, ( not just eat, I think some people did other self discipline things like no sex) then here in Australia eating fish doesn't really achieve that

    Fish is no cheaper and really no simpler a meal than meat - and of course fancy lobster and seafood all you can eat buffets are not simple or cheap at all.

    It makes more sense to me to give up something you like that is a 'fancy extra' like meat was in those days - self discipline is good
    Even better if you donate the money you would of spent on the fancy thing to a charity.

    I have given up chocolate for the 6 weeks of Lent sometimes with that reasoning and am thinking of giving up cappacinos this year.

    But if I hated meat or was already a vegetarian I don't see what purpose eating beyond burger would be, in regards to Lent
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,521Member Member Posts: 5,521Member Member
    Real meat eater here for life. Although, I do believe in moderation when it comes to eating red meat. Hell NO to fake meat! :D


    Well, I guess we all have things that are Hell, no! For us just on personal taste or 'the thought of it' reasons.

    I'm like that with liver, tripe and similar

    Nothing inherently wrong with eating them, but for me personally Hell, no!

    Says nothing about the product though, just about my personal bias - so as an actual point in a debate, pretty meaningless.
  • amusedmonkeyamusedmonkey Posts: 10,021Member Member Posts: 10,021Member Member
    Given the original purpose of giving things up for Lent was to eat simply and cheaply, ( not just eat, I think some people did other self discipline things like no sex) then here in Australia eating fish doesn't really achieve that

    Fish is no cheaper and really no simpler a meal than meat - and of course fancy lobster and seafood all you can eat buffets are not simple or cheap at all.

    It makes more sense to me to give up something you like that is a 'fancy extra' like meat was in those days - self discipline is good
    Even better if you donate the money you would of spent on the fancy thing to a charity.

    I have given up chocolate for the 6 weeks of Lent sometimes with that reasoning and am thinking of giving up cappacinos this year.

    But if I hated meat or was already a vegetarian I don't see what purpose eating beyond burger would be, in regards to Lent

    Lent has very strict rules here, so the one or two times during Lend that we can eat fish, we absolutely will regardless of how expensive it is. It's usually eaten to celebrate certain special days during Lent so being a celebration, eating expensive fish and drinking wine does not break the "spirit" of it in our case.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,521Member Member Posts: 5,521Member Member
    That's the difference I suppose - Lent does not at all have strict rules here, certainly not in Uniting church of Australia anyway, can't speak for all churches.

    So, is up to individual to decide what and why they will give up whatever they do.
  • chelleedubchelleedub Posts: 59Member Member Posts: 59Member Member
    I prefer not to murder in order to eat, but also to eat healthfully, so yes, I eat them in moderation. Everyone eats in accordance with their own values and preferences; these are mine.
  • FibroHikerFibroHiker Posts: 269Member Member Posts: 269Member Member
    My hubby has been eating less meat due to GI issues and we have adopted an almost vegan diet across the board. We tried the Beyond Meat Famous Star at Carl's Jr and those things are very tasty. I decided to purchase a couple of Beyond Meat patties at the grocery store and make "burgers" at home and we enjoyed it very much.
  • chelleedubchelleedub Posts: 59Member Member Posts: 59Member Member
    just_Tomek wrote: »
    PAPYRUS3 wrote: »
    “If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don't. ”

    ― Michael Pollan

    So if you process the food in your house and not a factory / plant, then that would be good to eat? Is it the plant / factories you (Pollan) have the issues with? Completely disagree.

    But if it is processed in your body rather than a pan over a fire or stovep; THAT's okay? Everything is a chemical process.
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 8,521Member Member Posts: 8,521Member Member
    chelleedub wrote: »
    just_Tomek wrote: »
    PAPYRUS3 wrote: »
    “If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don't. ”

    ― Michael Pollan

    So if you process the food in your house and not a factory / plant, then that would be good to eat? Is it the plant / factories you (Pollan) have the issues with? Completely disagree.

    But if it is processed in your body rather than a pan over a fire or stovep; THAT's okay? Everything is a chemical process.

    Serious? You are going to compare how your body processed stuff to a factory / house? Wow... now you are stretching a tiny little bit ;)
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