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The Great Fitness Scam

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  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 1,128Member Member Posts: 1,128Member Member
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.
  • DjproulxDjproulx Posts: 1,626Member Member Posts: 1,626Member Member

    "Find something you love and do it." is bad advice for most people. If getting in shape was that much fun, we would all be in great shape. Sure, you can do fun things that simultaneously increase your fitness, but in reality, most of the effective fitness things you do are rigorous and not that much fun. The gratification for me is always getting it over with - get out of bed, get to the gym / out on the street / in the pool / on your bike / etc., and just knock it out. Make it a habit, do it so often and so consistently that you don't entertain the idea of skipping it or quitting. It is up there with your job, taking care of your family, maintaining your house, etc. Just another mandatory thing you do.

    The takeaway from this article is that we just want to throw money at something that is understood to increase fitness and hope that is enough. If I get that great looking workout outfit, that $400 Garmin, and join that cool gym, then I will certainly be compelled to get in shape. This clearly doesn't work.

    This is a great topic. Thanks for sharing.

    To me, your bolded comment above hit the nail on the head regarding what works and what doesn't in determining long term fitness success. Fitness must become a habit. What's the saying? "We are what we habitually do." Motivation comes and goes (just read the forum posts!) but those who are physically fit have made fitness a habit that is part of their lifestyle.

    With that said, does that mean that I shouldn't be looking at a new Garmin, a new spandex race kit and fancy carbon wheels for my bike? :)
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 4,961Member Member Posts: 4,961Member Member
    jeagogo wrote: »
    I think this goes beyond just fitness related spending. Pretty much all products are marketed with the proposition that they will make your life easier and solve your problems without you having to put in any effort. You see the same thing with kitchen appliances, cleaning supplies, cosmetics, etc. I'm sure the US also leads the world in spending on those areas, too. We're just conditioned to think that spending money is in some way going to improve our lives and make us happier, and that possessing objects is an indicator of success.

    Yeah, that was my thought too, as well as that the US likely leads the world in lots of different kinds of spending.
  • bmeadows380bmeadows380 Posts: 1,932Member Member Posts: 1,932Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    jeagogo wrote: »
    I think this goes beyond just fitness related spending. Pretty much all products are marketed with the proposition that they will make your life easier and solve your problems without you having to put in any effort. You see the same thing with kitchen appliances, cleaning supplies, cosmetics, etc. I'm sure the US also leads the world in spending on those areas, too. We're just conditioned to think that spending money is in some way going to improve our lives and make us happier, and that possessing objects is an indicator of success.

    Yeah, that was my thought too, as well as that the US likely leads the world in lots of different kinds of spending.

    and that's probably directly related to the fact that the US is the richest country in the world.
  • J72FITJ72FIT Posts: 5,440Member Member Posts: 5,440Member Member
    "In addition, the health and fitness industry has become obsessed with complexity..."

    ^^^This...
  • J72FITJ72FIT Posts: 5,440Member Member Posts: 5,440Member Member
    IMO, a big part of it is also the reality that people need to manage their expectations. It isn't a linear process and it takes time. You did not get fat and out of shape overnight, so getting lean and fit won't happen overnight either.

  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 22,165Member Member Posts: 22,165Member Member
    J72FIT wrote: »
    IMO, a big part of it is also the reality that people need to manage their expectations. It isn't a linear process and it takes time. You did not get fat and out of shape overnight, so getting lean and fit won't happen overnight either.

    So many infomercials or "weight loss systems" promise that it will be fast and you will not have to change anything else about your life.
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 7,143Member, Premium Member Posts: 7,143Member, Premium Member
    J72FIT wrote: »
    IMO, a big part of it is also the reality that people need to manage their expectations. It isn't a linear process and it takes time. You did not get fat and out of shape overnight, so getting lean and fit won't happen overnight either.

    Well it is a linear process but we have no easy way of measuring/perceiving it. Trusting the power of incremental change is not always easy.
  • fitnessguy266fitnessguy266 Posts: 124Member Member Posts: 124Member Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    IMO, a big part of it is also the reality that people need to manage their expectations. It isn't a linear process and it takes time. You did not get fat and out of shape overnight, so getting lean and fit won't happen overnight either.

    Well it is a linear process but we have no easy way of measuring/perceiving it. Trusting the power of incremental change is not always easy.


    And this...is why.

  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 37,849Member Member Posts: 37,849Member Member
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.

    Yeah, lifting is purely functional for me. I like what it does for my body aesthetically and as I get older it'll be nice to be able to get off the toilette or couch or in and out of my car easier because I do squats and it's nice to be able to move furniture or whatever around when I need to. Also, strong legs makes climbing hills on the bike a heck of a lot more fun.

    As cycling goes, I don't ever even really think about it in terms of "cardio"...I mean, it is, but I never say to myself, "I need to get some cardio in, I'll go for a ride." I just go ride because it's fun AF. I'm actually ditching my trainer session this evening and bouncing early from the office because it's supposed to be around 63* and sunny with no wind and there is a single track down by the river that I haven't hit in quite awhile so I'm going to go tear that thing up this afternoon on my hardtail. It's fairly flat, so I'll be able to just cook the *kitten* out of it. Then I'm going to pick my boys up from school and we'll ride home together and grill cheeseburgers.

  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 14,254Member Member Posts: 14,254Member Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.

    Yeah, lifting is purely functional for me. I like what it does for my body aesthetically and as I get older it'll be nice to be able to get off the toilette or couch or in and out of my car easier because I do squats and it's nice to be able to move furniture or whatever around when I need to. Also, strong legs makes climbing hills on the bike a heck of a lot more fun.

    As cycling goes, I don't ever even really think about it in terms of "cardio"...I mean, it is, but I never say to myself, "I need to get some cardio in, I'll go for a ride." I just go ride because it's fun AF. I'm actually ditching my trainer session this evening and bouncing early from the office because it's supposed to be around 63* and sunny with no wind and there is a single track down by the river that I haven't hit in quite awhile so I'm going to go tear that thing up this afternoon on my hardtail. It's fairly flat, so I'll be able to just cook the *kitten* out of it. Then I'm going to pick my boys up from school and we'll ride home together and grill cheeseburgers.

    Pretty much this, with the exception that I'm less disciplined about weights, and I mostly substitute boat-love for bike-love.

    I find it weird, in fact, that people talk about "cardio" as if it were all one thing, with the same characteristics and benefits. It's not really sensible even to compare weight training to "cardio" in anything but the most high-level terms, because the different methods and modalities (of both, but especially "cardio") are so very different. Walking on a treadmill, biking (of different types!), swimming, rowing, using a stair-climber, others . . . all have rather different cumulative effects on the body, even though they're all "cardio".
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 1,128Member Member Posts: 1,128Member Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.

    Yeah, lifting is purely functional for me. I like what it does for my body aesthetically and as I get older it'll be nice to be able to get off the toilette or couch or in and out of my car easier because I do squats and it's nice to be able to move furniture or whatever around when I need to. Also, strong legs makes climbing hills on the bike a heck of a lot more fun.

    As cycling goes, I don't ever even really think about it in terms of "cardio"...I mean, it is, but I never say to myself, "I need to get some cardio in, I'll go for a ride." I just go ride because it's fun AF. I'm actually ditching my trainer session this evening and bouncing early from the office because it's supposed to be around 63* and sunny with no wind and there is a single track down by the river that I haven't hit in quite awhile so I'm going to go tear that thing up this afternoon on my hardtail. It's fairly flat, so I'll be able to just cook the *kitten* out of it. Then I'm going to pick my boys up from school and we'll ride home together and grill cheeseburgers.

    Pretty much this, with the exception that I'm less disciplined about weights, and I mostly substitute boat-love for bike-love.

    I find it weird, in fact, that people talk about "cardio" as if it were all one thing, with the same characteristics and benefits. It's not really sensible even to compare weight training to "cardio" in anything but the most high-level terms, because the different methods and modalities (of both, but especially "cardio") are so very different. Walking on a treadmill, biking (of different types!), swimming, rowing, using a stair-climber, others . . . all have rather different cumulative effects on the body, even though they're all "cardio".
    Eh, cAMP pathway versus mTOR.
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 7,143Member, Premium Member Posts: 7,143Member, Premium Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.

    Yeah, lifting is purely functional for me. I like what it does for my body aesthetically and as I get older it'll be nice to be able to get off the toilette or couch or in and out of my car easier because I do squats and it's nice to be able to move furniture or whatever around when I need to. Also, strong legs makes climbing hills on the bike a heck of a lot more fun.

    As cycling goes, I don't ever even really think about it in terms of "cardio"...I mean, it is, but I never say to myself, "I need to get some cardio in, I'll go for a ride." I just go ride because it's fun AF. I'm actually ditching my trainer session this evening and bouncing early from the office because it's supposed to be around 63* and sunny with no wind and there is a single track down by the river that I haven't hit in quite awhile so I'm going to go tear that thing up this afternoon on my hardtail. It's fairly flat, so I'll be able to just cook the *kitten* out of it. Then I'm going to pick my boys up from school and we'll ride home together and grill cheeseburgers.

    Pretty much this, with the exception that I'm less disciplined about weights, and I mostly substitute boat-love for bike-love.

    I find it weird, in fact, that people talk about "cardio" as if it were all one thing, with the same characteristics and benefits. It's not really sensible even to compare weight training to "cardio" in anything but the most high-level terms, because the different methods and modalities (of both, but especially "cardio") are so very different. Walking on a treadmill, biking (of different types!), swimming, rowing, using a stair-climber, others . . . all have rather different cumulative effects on the body, even though they're all "cardio".

    I call it cardio if my primary objective is a sustained increase in heart rate. I do not consider walking outside cardio because I don't really care about my heart rate I just want to be outside moving.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Posts: 9,601Member Member Posts: 9,601Member Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.

    Yeah, lifting is purely functional for me. I like what it does for my body aesthetically and as I get older it'll be nice to be able to get off the toilette or couch or in and out of my car easier because I do squats and it's nice to be able to move furniture or whatever around when I need to. Also, strong legs makes climbing hills on the bike a heck of a lot more fun.

    As cycling goes, I don't ever even really think about it in terms of "cardio"...I mean, it is, but I never say to myself, "I need to get some cardio in, I'll go for a ride." I just go ride because it's fun AF. I'm actually ditching my trainer session this evening and bouncing early from the office because it's supposed to be around 63* and sunny with no wind and there is a single track down by the river that I haven't hit in quite awhile so I'm going to go tear that thing up this afternoon on my hardtail. It's fairly flat, so I'll be able to just cook the *kitten* out of it. Then I'm going to pick my boys up from school and we'll ride home together and grill cheeseburgers.

    Exactly this.

    I don't consider hiking "fun" and got a lot of flack for saying so in a hiking community. I love doing it, it's peaceful, the views are to die for, it can be educational in the sense that I'll see something when I'm out on (or off) a trail and then come back to civilization and learn about what I saw, it deepens my appreciation of life, makes me feel like I'm using my limited time on this Earth wisely ... I could go on and on. But I never do it for exercise or calories, I do it because it's rewarding.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 14,254Member Member Posts: 14,254Member Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.

    Yeah, lifting is purely functional for me. I like what it does for my body aesthetically and as I get older it'll be nice to be able to get off the toilette or couch or in and out of my car easier because I do squats and it's nice to be able to move furniture or whatever around when I need to. Also, strong legs makes climbing hills on the bike a heck of a lot more fun.

    As cycling goes, I don't ever even really think about it in terms of "cardio"...I mean, it is, but I never say to myself, "I need to get some cardio in, I'll go for a ride." I just go ride because it's fun AF. I'm actually ditching my trainer session this evening and bouncing early from the office because it's supposed to be around 63* and sunny with no wind and there is a single track down by the river that I haven't hit in quite awhile so I'm going to go tear that thing up this afternoon on my hardtail. It's fairly flat, so I'll be able to just cook the *kitten* out of it. Then I'm going to pick my boys up from school and we'll ride home together and grill cheeseburgers.

    Pretty much this, with the exception that I'm less disciplined about weights, and I mostly substitute boat-love for bike-love.

    I find it weird, in fact, that people talk about "cardio" as if it were all one thing, with the same characteristics and benefits. It's not really sensible even to compare weight training to "cardio" in anything but the most high-level terms, because the different methods and modalities (of both, but especially "cardio") are so very different. Walking on a treadmill, biking (of different types!), swimming, rowing, using a stair-climber, others . . . all have rather different cumulative effects on the body, even though they're all "cardio".
    Eh, cAMP pathway versus mTOR.

    IMU, which is admittedly very limited/amateur, it doesn't seem that pure, in practice, even considering potential inhibition effects. Real-world activities involve complex patterns, and have diverse results.

    If a person's trying to optimize a particular effect (physical outcome), purity probably matters. If just trying to have a good time, be healthier, feel better . . . different physical effects on the body from different "cardio" choices are a thing that happens.
  • J72FITJ72FIT Posts: 5,440Member Member Posts: 5,440Member Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.

    Yeah, lifting is purely functional for me. I like what it does for my body aesthetically and as I get older it'll be nice to be able to get off the toilette or couch or in and out of my car easier because I do squats and it's nice to be able to move furniture or whatever around when I need to. Also, strong legs makes climbing hills on the bike a heck of a lot more fun.

    As cycling goes, I don't ever even really think about it in terms of "cardio"...I mean, it is, but I never say to myself, "I need to get some cardio in, I'll go for a ride." I just go ride because it's fun AF. I'm actually ditching my trainer session this evening and bouncing early from the office because it's supposed to be around 63* and sunny with no wind and there is a single track down by the river that I haven't hit in quite awhile so I'm going to go tear that thing up this afternoon on my hardtail. It's fairly flat, so I'll be able to just cook the *kitten* out of it. Then I'm going to pick my boys up from school and we'll ride home together and grill cheeseburgers.

    Exactly this.

    I don't consider hiking "fun" and got a lot of flack for saying so in a hiking community. I love doing it, it's peaceful, the views are to die for, it can be educational in the sense that I'll see something when I'm out on (or off) a trail and then come back to civilization and learn about what I saw, it deepens my appreciation of life, makes me feel like I'm using my limited time on this Earth wisely ... I could go on and on. But I never do it for exercise or calories, I do it because it's rewarding.

    This is exactly how I feel about jumping rope. I feel like a kid when I jump rope. Add to that the fun in learning new techniques etc...
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 37,849Member Member Posts: 37,849Member Member
    J72FIT wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Interesting there seems to be at least a few people that found a cardio that was fun, but view weights as purely functional.

    I'm about the opposite. I've found running fun at the times I've done something new in it, but even the scenic outdoors stuff, I still just get the most out of whatever I'm listening to and the health.

    Weights I tend to find a way to keep pushing at, even at times I know my current deficit means practical advancement is not possible. Even for all the time I was stuck using just barbell routines by the limits of working out at home.

    Yeah, lifting is purely functional for me. I like what it does for my body aesthetically and as I get older it'll be nice to be able to get off the toilette or couch or in and out of my car easier because I do squats and it's nice to be able to move furniture or whatever around when I need to. Also, strong legs makes climbing hills on the bike a heck of a lot more fun.

    As cycling goes, I don't ever even really think about it in terms of "cardio"...I mean, it is, but I never say to myself, "I need to get some cardio in, I'll go for a ride." I just go ride because it's fun AF. I'm actually ditching my trainer session this evening and bouncing early from the office because it's supposed to be around 63* and sunny with no wind and there is a single track down by the river that I haven't hit in quite awhile so I'm going to go tear that thing up this afternoon on my hardtail. It's fairly flat, so I'll be able to just cook the *kitten* out of it. Then I'm going to pick my boys up from school and we'll ride home together and grill cheeseburgers.

    Exactly this.

    I don't consider hiking "fun" and got a lot of flack for saying so in a hiking community. I love doing it, it's peaceful, the views are to die for, it can be educational in the sense that I'll see something when I'm out on (or off) a trail and then come back to civilization and learn about what I saw, it deepens my appreciation of life, makes me feel like I'm using my limited time on this Earth wisely ... I could go on and on. But I never do it for exercise or calories, I do it because it's rewarding.

    This is exactly how I feel about jumping rope. I feel like a kid when I jump rope. Add to that the fun in learning new techniques etc...

    I'm teaching my kids double dutch...

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