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Silicone Baking Mats vrs. Parchment

PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,470 Member Member Posts: 8,470 Member
in Recipes
Those that have used both, which one is your preference? I guess one would not have to 'grease' either one?

Any brands better quality than others? Wondering if the no name brand of parchment isn't as good as another premium type brand.

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  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Member Posts: 4,656 Member Member Posts: 4,656 Member
    Well if I say something you don’t really want to know, at least it will bump this back to page one, so here goes.

    I have never used silicone. I have used parchment. So far I’ve never used any that wasn’t good. I have used several brands.
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,470 Member Member Posts: 8,470 Member
  • harper16harper16 Member Posts: 2,568 Member Member Posts: 2,568 Member
    I use both and honestly don't have a preference one over the other. Parchment is normally whatever is on sale.
  • Katmary71Katmary71 Member Posts: 4,042 Member Member Posts: 4,042 Member
    I've used parchment to make cookies on but haven't used it at my own house, the only thing I disliked about it was it was Costco's and didn't fit on the cookie sheet well because it was too big.

    I have silicone mats from Costco, they're not as great as I thought they'd be though they have good reviews. They're stained (don't make butternut squash on them as it stains!) and look gross even though I clean them every time, and putting herbs and spices on food ends up sticking to the mat and you have to scrub the heck out of them. Cooking stuff with something like balsamic vinegar usually spills onto the cookie sheet anyhow so you end up scrubbing it. For things like making tostadas it's great but I'm usually making veggies, chicken, or fish. If it's meat I don't even bother but use foil instead of the mats, I don't want to spend forever getting fat off them.
  • BarbaraHelen2013BarbaraHelen2013 Member Posts: 1,343 Member Member Posts: 1,343 Member
    I’d say that whilst I do have both I vastly prefer using parchment. Some foods definitely cook differently when cooked on a silicone sheet vs baking paper.

    In general parchment is a lot more versatile, since it can be cut to fit/line any shape of cooking/baking tin. I’ve never had any issue with it. I just use the supermarket’s own brand (whichever supermarket I happen to be in when I’m running low).

    My silicone sheet lives most of it’s life rolled up in the back of a cupboard, my roll of parchment lives easily to hand with the cling film, foil and food bags. I guess that tells it’s own story as to which is my preference! 😊
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,470 Member Member Posts: 8,470 Member
    just_Tomek wrote: »
    PAPYRUS3 wrote: »
    Those that have used both, which one is your preference? I guess one would not have to 'grease' either one?

    Any brands better quality than others? Wondering if the no name brand of parchment isn't as good as another premium type brand.

    If I am going to roast something at 425F or higher, or broil after, its silicone mat for me. Paper will burn.
    Anything else is paper. Only because I do not want to deal with cleaning the mat.

    Yes, that is what I've been finding too (regarding the paper burning) so I thought of silicone.

    Thanks everyone🌼
    edited May 2020
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member
    I love my Silpat, I feel it performs much better than parchment paper and I like that I never have to worry about it running out.
  • missysippy930missysippy930 Member Posts: 2,391 Member Member Posts: 2,391 Member
    I prefer parchment paper. I have found the generic brands lay on the pans nicer and are a bit cheaper. Of course the trick of crumpling the paper works for laying flat on the pans for any parchment paper that won’t lay flat. I can’t think of anything I’ve ever baked above 400 degrees and used parchment for so I haven’t had any experience with the paper burning. I’m a big fan of less things to wash and parchment makes clean up a breeze. It’s great for making fish packets for baking, nothing sticks. Love parchment.
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,622 Member Member Posts: 5,622 Member
    For things i cook regularly such as cookies and meringue bases for pavlova, silicon lined paper works better because it conducts heat better from the tin for better browning on the bottom. My silicon mats leave soggy bottoms. I guess anything you wouldn't mind cooking in a glass perspex dish would be perfectly fine on silicon making mats.

    The only thing I make regularly on my silicon baking mats are sheets of cardamon infused salted caramel that get peeled off and crushed to add as a spice mixture to curries. Honeycomb is not in my current repertoire, but I imagine I would use the baking mats for that too.

    I wish I liked my silicon baking mats more because they are more environmentally friendly.
  • Rhumax67Rhumax67 Member Posts: 188 Member Member Posts: 188 Member
    Parchment for me. I gave my silpats away to someone who uses them.
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,470 Member Member Posts: 8,470 Member
    Great points all! I should really just have a silicon mat on hand and try to incorporate - like you said @acpgee - it's 'more environmentally friendly'. I hate tossing into the recycling bin everyday...🤨

    edited May 2020
  • GreenValliGreenValli Member Posts: 1,044 Member Member Posts: 1,044 Member
    Parchment paper is nice because you can cut it to fit the pan or container you are using. It is disposable and easy to use. The Silicone mats are especially good if you are baking something using a cookie sheet. Most of the mats fit just right. Yes, you do not need to use butter or oil. I use parchment paper or a silicon mat depending on what I am making.
  • earlnabbyearlnabby Member Posts: 8,058 Member Member Posts: 8,058 Member
    Most things I prefer neither. I use non stick baking pans for things like cookies and have the best luck with non-stick spray and flour (or flour and cocoa mixed for chocolate) for things like brownies, sheet cakes, and bars. I tried the silicone mats and really dislike the results.

    The exceptions:

    Sponge cake gets waxed paper rather than parchment
    Layer cakes also get waxed paper circles on the bottom of the pans with the sides getting greased and floured
    Sourdough or rustic bread gets parchment with no added greasing. They get baked at 450° and I have never had the paper burn.
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,622 Member Member Posts: 5,622 Member
    If anyone else is trying to reduce consumption of single use plastics in the kitchen I came across the following products. I originally bought my silicon baking mats with the idea of reducing waste but was disappointed by heat conduction because they are thicker than silicon lined paper.

    I bought the large, standup and sandwich bag size of this product as an alternative to ziplock bags whidh I wash and re-use for as long as I can. For sous vide I mostly use the trianglar stand up bag and large bag but occasionally use the small sandwich bag for a couple of steaks or chicken breasts. If I had to do it again I would just buy to the two larger models.
    https://www.stasherbag.com/

    I ordered a couple of these as a replacement for cling film or saran wrap. They haven't arrived yet so I can't attest to how well they work.
    https://thefoodguard.com/

    At risk of hijacking this thread would be curious about other products that reduce single use plastics in the kitchen.

  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,470 Member Member Posts: 8,470 Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    If anyone else is trying to reduce consumption of single use plastics in the kitchen I came across the following products. I originally bought my silicon baking mats with the idea of reducing waste but was disappointed by heat conduction because they are thicker than silicon lined paper.

    I bought the large, standup and sandwich bag size of this product as an alternative to ziplock bags whidh I wash and re-use for as long as I can. For sous vide I mostly use the trianglar stand up bag and large bag but occasionally use the small sandwich bag for a couple of steaks or chicken breasts. If I had to do it again I would just buy to the two larger models.
    https://www.stasherbag.com/

    I ordered a couple of these as a replacement for cling film or saran wrap. They haven't arrived yet so I can't attest to how well they work.
    https://thefoodguard.com/

    At risk of hijacking this thread would be curious about other products that reduce single use plastics in the kitchen.

    There are Beeswax reusable wraps - even DIY on line too (Youtube, etc.,) I'm curious about trying to make my own.

    I've actually been using (washing and reusing) Press n Seal paper. I line the paper with parchment so the food isn't in constant contact with a plastic. I really like this product because it's so moldable - easy to wash up/dry and reuse.

    I mainly use glass for storage as much as I can.
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,622 Member Member Posts: 5,622 Member
    Actually a girlfriend brought me a gift of very fine silicoon mesh that works better than those silicon baking mats. It is foldable, but prone to get tears. Very thin and performs more like silicon lined paper in terms of heat conduction. She bought it at a dime store.
  • ChefMaderChefMader Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
    As a professional chef of 20+ years, I have to say there is NOTHING as good as professional parchment paper. This is to say - the kind you buy at the restaurant supply store in half and full-size sheets. Even the kind you buy in a regular grocery store is not as good as the professional brand. It's amazing. Nonstick spray and tons of browning. Silicone does not provide what parchment does, and eventually takes on odors and flavors of the foods cooked on it....and cooked plastic is not great for you anyway.
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 8,470 Member Member Posts: 8,470 Member
    ChefMader wrote: »
    As a professional chef of 20+ years, I have to say there is NOTHING as good as professional parchment paper. This is to say - the kind you buy at the restaurant supply store in half and full-size sheets. Even the kind you buy in a regular grocery store is not as good as the professional brand. It's amazing. Nonstick spray and tons of browning. Silicone does not provide what parchment does, and eventually takes on odors and flavors of the foods cooked on it....and cooked plastic is not great for you anyway.

    I too remember (many, many years ago) using professional grade parchment paper with great results...mind you, we also sprayed quite a bit of Vegalene on top of it too.

    Thanks for sharing your insights regarding the silicone (I'm sure your right regarding cooking on plastic...) Mind you, isn't parchment paper coated with silicone?
    edited May 2020
  • earlnabbyearlnabby Member Posts: 8,058 Member Member Posts: 8,058 Member
    PAPYRUS3 wrote: »
    ChefMader wrote: »
    As a professional chef of 20+ years, I have to say there is NOTHING as good as professional parchment paper. This is to say - the kind you buy at the restaurant supply store in half and full-size sheets. Even the kind you buy in a regular grocery store is not as good as the professional brand. It's amazing. Nonstick spray and tons of browning. Silicone does not provide what parchment does, and eventually takes on odors and flavors of the foods cooked on it....and cooked plastic is not great for you anyway.

    I too remember (many, many years ago) using professional grade parchment paper with great results...mind you, we also sprayed quite a bit of Vegalene on top of it too.

    Thanks for sharing your insights regarding the silicone (I'm sure your right regarding cooking on plastic...) Mind you, isn't parchment paper coated with silicone?

    There are two items referred to as “parchment paper”. Most is cellulose based paper run through an acid bath so it partially gelatinizes which makes it non-stick. Bakery release paper is typically treated with silicone.

  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Member Posts: 4,656 Member Member Posts: 4,656 Member
    I bought a huge roll of unwaxed butcher paper years ago. I cooked on it, like parchment. It was fantastic for so many things! I kept it in the kitchen, but I also used it to alter patterns when I made our clothes. The kids colored on it. I used it as a drop cloth when I painted. Etc. it was worth way more than I paid for it.
    edited May 2020
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