Calorie Counter

Message Boards Goal: Gaining Weight and Body Building
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Boxing for seniors

geniebear72geniebear72 Member Posts: 4 Member Member Posts: 4 Member
Does anybody know of any programs of boxing that are good for senior citizens?

Replies

  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,097 Member Member Posts: 1,097 Member
    Are you talking about boxing style workouts or actually training to box with a live person?
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 15,918 Member Member, Premium Posts: 15,918 Member
    And can you define "senior", plus comment on any personal issues you might need to work with (problem joints, osteopenia/osteoporosis) or anything like that)? (If you don't want to share your age, that's fine - but sometimes we see 30-somethings on here thinking they're old! :lol: ).

    A healthy senior of average-for-all-ages fitness level ought to be able to do a normal boxing *workout*, though I'd use caution with actual sparring, personally. (I say that because, for me, at age 64, injury recovery is slower than it was when I was 20, and de-training during forced breaks is faster, so there's a higher priority for me on avoiding injury, at this age). For similar reasons, I'd use caution with high-impact heavy bag work, being sure to understand technique in anything potentially extra-strainful like that and certain other things, and not be going aggressively fast in intensity progressions. "Know thyself" is a pretty big deal.

    Like I said, I'm 64, pretty active. Truth in advertising: I used to practice not boxing, but Chinese martial arts (various branches of kung fu) regularly, in my 30s/40s. (My late husband was a teacher.) Even then, I avoided jumping kicks (bad knees, excess weight), even though I could teach the kids to do them. :lol: I never loved sparring so did very little, though others around me did. My knees don't tolerate the torque involved well, anymore, but I could do some of the striking and weapons stuff, if I chose, without much worry, even with osteopenia/osteoporosis. Joint locking . . . hmm, maybe a worry, on the victim side - but that's not part of boxing. Takedowns, on the victim side ;), maybe some worry.

    If you're thinking of live instruction of some type, have an honest discussion with the trainer.
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,492 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,492 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    And can you define "senior", plus comment on any personal issues you might need to work with (problem joints, osteopenia/osteoporosis) or anything like that)? (If you don't want to share your age, that's fine - but sometimes we see 30-somethings on here thinking they're old! :lol: ).

    A healthy senior of average-for-all-ages fitness level ought to be able to do a normal boxing *workout*, though I'd use caution with actual sparring, personally. (I say that because, for me, at age 64, injury recovery is slower than it was when I was 20, and de-training during forced breaks is faster, so there's a higher priority for me on avoiding injury, at this age). For similar reasons, I'd use caution with high-impact heavy bag work, being sure to understand technique in anything potentially extra-strainful like that and certain other things, and not be going aggressively fast in intensity progressions. "Know thyself" is a pretty big deal.

    Like I said, I'm 64, pretty active. Truth in advertising: I used to practice not boxing, but Chinese martial arts (various branches of kung fu) regularly, in my 30s/40s. (My late husband was a teacher.) Even then, I avoided jumping kicks (bad knees, excess weight), even though I could teach the kids to do them. :lol: I never loved sparring so did very little, though others around me did. My knees don't tolerate the torque involved well, anymore, but I could do some of the striking and weapons stuff, if I chose, without much worry, even with osteopenia/osteoporosis. Joint locking . . . hmm, maybe a worry, on the victim side - but that's not part of boxing. Takedowns, on the victim side ;), maybe some worry.

    If you're thinking of live instruction of some type, have an honest discussion with the trainer.

    I wouldn't fight you Aunt Granny! I would be a little scared! :#
  • SnifterPugSnifterPug Member Posts: 346 Member Member Posts: 346 Member
    Boxing should be just fine. As with any exercise regime, though, you need to start carefully and take into account any physical limitations. Ideally you would get some live tuition as the technique does matter - you can damage the bones in your hands and wrists if you don't protect adequately and hit right. Even shadow boxing needs some care or you can over-extend your elbow joint. (Gosh, I don't seem to be selling this very well, all of a sudden...)

    Seriously, though, it is super fun. A previous trainer of mine who is an MMA pro (and still managed to break his hand) started training a guy in his late 70s or thereabouts and that guy was doing fine last I heard.
  • sgt1372sgt1372 Member Posts: 3,596 Member Member Posts: 3,596 Member
    Does anybody know of any programs of boxing that are good for senior citizens?

    No, I don't know of any boxing programs specifcally designed for "seniors" but, other than limiting the rigour of the training program and the amount of full boxing contact allowed, I don't see how a boxing program for seniors would be any different that younger adults.

    So, if you are really interested in boxing as a form of "exercise" and/or fitness training, visit a boxing gym near you and talk to a trainer/coach there to see what they can offer you.

    That said, I am a senior and am a fan of amateur and professional boxing, as a spectator, but based on what I've seen, I really don't think that full contact boxing is good for anyone, especially NOT the boxers, and I have absolutely no interest in boxing w/anyone.

    To each, his/her own. Good luck!
    edited July 23
  • LockdownLoser23LockdownLoser23 Member, Premium Posts: 93 Member Member, Premium Posts: 93 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    And can you define "senior", plus comment on any personal issues you might need to work with (problem joints, osteopenia/osteoporosis) or anything like that)? (If you don't want to share your age, that's fine - but sometimes we see 30-somethings on here thinking they're old! :lol: ).

    A healthy senior of average-for-all-ages fitness level ought to be able to do a normal boxing *workout*, though I'd use caution with actual sparring, personally. (I say that because, for me, at age 64, injury recovery is slower than it was when I was 20, and de-training during forced breaks is faster, so there's a higher priority for me on avoiding injury, at this age). For similar reasons, I'd use caution with high-impact heavy bag work, being sure to understand technique in anything potentially extra-strainful like that and certain other things, and not be going aggressively fast in intensity progressions. "Know thyself" is a pretty big deal.

    Like I said, I'm 64, pretty active. Truth in advertising: I used to practice not boxing, but Chinese martial arts (various branches of kung fu) regularly, in my 30s/40s. (My late husband was a teacher.) Even then, I avoided jumping kicks (bad knees, excess weight), even though I could teach the kids to do them. :lol: I never loved sparring so did very little, though others around me did. My knees don't tolerate the torque involved well, anymore, but I could do some of the striking and weapons stuff, if I chose, without much worry, even with osteopenia/osteoporosis. Joint locking . . . hmm, maybe a worry, on the victim side - but that's not part of boxing. Takedowns, on the victim side ;), maybe some worry.

    If you're thinking of live instruction of some type, have an honest discussion with the trainer.

    Thanks for telling us a story all about you :) - I agree sparring may not be the best idea
  • LockdownLoser23LockdownLoser23 Member, Premium Posts: 93 Member Member, Premium Posts: 93 Member
    I don't know any programmes but I'd focus on the core skills. Shadow boxing rounds or heavy bag rounds - do 30 seconds jabs...30 seconds squats or lunges and then 30 seconds jab cross...30 seconds skipping (no rope) and the 30 seconds hooks. Skipping or (jump rope) may be an option depending how well you have aged sir.

    Another simple but tough bag workout is 1 to 10. Left hand 1 punch...2 punches...3 punches..4 punches....up to 10 and then go 9, 8, 7, 6, 5 etc...then the right hand. Maybe get some light dumbells and throw punch combos with them 60 second rounds.

    Hope you smash it mate :)
  • stuffykneestuffyknee Member Posts: 11 Member Member Posts: 11 Member
    I started going to a boxing gym at 46, and I love it! I wasn’t sure if I wanted to fight, but after 6 months (pre covid), I think I do! Apparently “masters” women’s boxing is the fastest growing amateur category in the US!
  • tnh2otnh2o Member Posts: 55 Member Member Posts: 55 Member
    @LockdownLoser23 AnnPT77 was just describing her experience from a senior perspective. Who else's story can she tell?
Sign In or Register to comment.