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Which weight loss method is the most successful?

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  • kimny72kimny72 Member Posts: 15,653 Member Member Posts: 15,653 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    80% lost weight over what timescale?
    If a short timescale (weeks, a few months) then that sounds a really poor success rate, if long term (meaning years) then it's amazing, if not incredible (in the true meaning of that word).

    My key to successfully losing weight and keeping it off was taking responsibility for how much I ate, what I ate and how much I moved and that would be my major reservation with a "coach approach". At some point you have to fly solo.

    Other reservations would be someone telling me to eat particular foods or adopt a style of eating as they seem to tout low energy density foods. Unfortunately that would mean that I would have to exclude or massively restrict a hell of a lot of foods that I like and are good for me. Exclusions or restrictions for me have to be minimised for my long term success.

    As with all dieting schemes it will suit some and not suit others and over the long term I wouldn't expect markedly different results to other schemes or methods.

    The article says that almost 80% reported weight loss while using the app for a median of 264 days. So basically 80% of people lost weight while trying to lose weight within a year. Not nearly as impressive sounding. :neutral:

    Having said that, I think Noom sounds like a pretty decent service for people who have issues around food or a lack of focus in the short term. But it's not free, so how well it works in the long term really depends on if it sets people up with good habits that they can stick to long term, and I don't think Noom has been popular for long enough for that data to exist, if it ever will. You'd need 5 - 10 year statistics and Noom would have to keep in touch with folks long after they stop paying for the service. Most people I know whove used it said it helped them short term but the coaching became repetitive and the expense didn't seem worth keeping.

    My short answer to the OP is to agree with all the other replies. Most methods will get you into a calorie deficit, and different ones will be best for different people. For me it was logging my food, eating what I like, and increasing my day to day activity level. Nothing marketable :lol:
  • KiernlaKiernla Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member Member, Premium Posts: 7 Member
    jo_nz wrote: »
    I think that noom figure is possibly a little misleading.

    I did the noom free trial, but I hated it. I found the "coaching" condescending and annoying so cancelled before the trial was over. I certainly didn't lose any weight on it, but I bet I am not part of that statistic.

    I don't argue that the information they give is helpful, but I didn't like how it was presented - I could get the same in here in a more matter-of-fact tone. For free.

    I had a similar experience. In fact, I suspected my coach was a bot, that was exactly how personalized the advice seemed. The setup didn't ask anything incisive, which was something I expected based on the marketing. I'm sure I'm not included in that statistic either - I only lasted 3 days.
  • tgillies003tgillies003 Member, Premium Posts: 321 Member Member, Premium Posts: 321 Member
    Weight loss happens when you are at a caloric deficit.
    I believe your debate topic is really: what method do people use to achieve the caloric deficit?
    Every ‘diet’ out there achieves a caloric deficit. Often these are by eliminating a food type.
    Noom is a little different because it looks at the psychology of why people are eating what they eat. But ultimately, has the same goal of caloric deficit.
    What method is ‘best’?
    —The one that works for you!
  • JSLuke59JSLuke59 Member Posts: 48 Member Member Posts: 48 Member
    You must develop a weight loss method that you can commit and live up to. It’s already been stated that you must be in a caloric deficit. Diet programs are only good if you can commit to them on a very long term basis, in most cases people are not willing to commit to the sacrifice required by them and abandon them before results can be seen. They lose it and gain it back again. Each person needs to develop an eating regimen that they can remain committed to in order to lose and maintain the loss. Generally it is a lifestyle change.
  • missysippy930missysippy930 Member Posts: 2,393 Member Member Posts: 2,393 Member
    Always, the one where you eat less calories than you burn. You can package it and promote it any way you want, but, weight loss always comes down to eating less calories than your body burns.
  • gigmastergigmaster Member Posts: 19 Member Member Posts: 19 Member
    I dunno. I don't think I can help you much here. I keep thinking I've lost 15 lbs, but every time I look behind, I find it again...
  • tgillies003tgillies003 Member, Premium Posts: 321 Member Member, Premium Posts: 321 Member
    senalay788 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    senalay788 wrote: »
    senalay788 wrote: »
    Keto.

    Uhh, no.



    Ok.
    Vegan . Vegetarian.

    Speaking as 46+ years a vegetarian (and fairly knowledgeable about fully plant-based eating):

    No. Way, way no. Experience based no.

    It was easy to get fat, then obese, as a vegetarian, and stay that way for decades, even when I added a pretty aggressive athletic training regimen (yes, while staying obese, for over a decade doing it). There are fat and obese vegans. I routinely try to talk people here out of becoming vegetarian/vegan if their *only* motivation is weight loss (or health, for that matter). It's a blind alley, a tangent, a red herring, an unnecessary complication, a distraction from the core issue . . . .

    There is no magical way of eating, for weight loss. And even if there were, it wouldn't be vegetarianism. NopeNopeNope.

    Tough crowd.
    If not keto and not vegan then maybe......... paleo. Yes, paleo. Sorry for the confusion.


    @senalay788
    I think what Ann is getting at here is: for weight loss, it does not matter what you are eating; what matters is how many calories are you eating as compared to how many calories you are expending.
    Caloric deficit = weight loss
    Caloric surplus = weight gain
    Neutral calories = maintain weight
    All of these can happen regardless of whether you are doing keto, paleo, vegan, vegetarian,etc.
    edited December 2020
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 18,171 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,171 Member
    senalay788 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    senalay788 wrote: »
    senalay788 wrote: »
    Keto.

    Uhh, no.



    Ok.
    Vegan . Vegetarian.

    Speaking as 46+ years a vegetarian (and fairly knowledgeable about fully plant-based eating):

    No. Way, way no. Experience based no.

    It was easy to get fat, then obese, as a vegetarian, and stay that way for decades, even when I added a pretty aggressive athletic training regimen (yes, while staying obese, for over a decade doing it). There are fat and obese vegans. I routinely try to talk people here out of becoming vegetarian/vegan if their *only* motivation is weight loss (or health, for that matter). It's a blind alley, a tangent, a red herring, an unnecessary complication, a distraction from the core issue . . . .

    There is no magical way of eating, for weight loss. And even if there were, it wouldn't be vegetarianism. NopeNopeNope.

    Tough crowd.
    If not keto and not vegan then maybe......... paleo. Yes, paleo. Sorry for the confusion.


    @senalay788
    I think what Ann is getting at here is: for weight loss, it does not matter what you are eating; what matters is how many calories are you eating as compared to how many calories you are expending.
    Caloric deficit = weight loss
    Caloric surplus = weight gain
    Neutral calories = maintain weight
    All of these can happen regardless of whether you are doing keto, paleo, vegan, vegetarian,etc.

    I think the point is that senalay's trolling. 🙄 Which I'm not flagging, FTR, just in case someone else does.
  • Dante_80Dante_80 Member Posts: 133 Member Member Posts: 133 Member
    threewins wrote: »
    Any other weight loss methods you know about?

    1. Eat less, exercise more. If you cannot exercise, then eat less.
    2. Find a way to eat less that is the most satisfying and easy to follow.


    edited December 2020
  • breefosheebreefoshee Member Posts: 392 Member Member Posts: 392 Member
    Does Noom pay NBC for advertisement? I always find it difficult to trust many sources because they often have a vested interest in a certain program being used.

    The other day I was trying to find the best daily planner for hitting goals. I typed this in the search bar and got advertisements or articles which were actually advertisements. I still don't know which is the best... but someone got $75 from me for a 2021 planner.

    So many people reach their goals in different ways. I know people who have lost quickly or with fad diets and have actually kept it off for years. I also know people who lost weight in a ways I respect that gained it all back.

    I think that motivation/determination plays a key role-- and how people power through is going to be different for everyone. I find it easy to lose weight when I have been losing weight because I'm excited about what I am doing and can see the results.
  • breefosheebreefoshee Member Posts: 392 Member Member Posts: 392 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    breefoshee wrote: »
    Does Noom pay NBC for advertisement? I always find it difficult to trust many sources because they often have a vested interest in a certain program being used.

    The other day I was trying to find the best daily planner for hitting goals. I typed this in the search bar and got advertisements or articles which were actually advertisements. I still don't know which is the best... but someone got $75 from me for a 2021 planner.

    So many people reach their goals in different ways. I know people who have lost quickly or with fad diets and have actually kept it off for years. I also know people who lost weight in a ways I respect that gained it all back.

    I think that motivation/determination plays a key role-- and how people power through is going to be different for everyone. I find it easy to lose weight when I have been losing weight because I'm excited about what I am doing and can see the results.

    Dunno. If motivation/determination were universally key, I'd still be obese (or be obese again), like I was for 3 decades or so, rather than being at a healthy weight 5+ years after losing. "Know thyself" is pretty important . . . personalization, to put it more prosaically - as you say, different people succeed in different ways.

    I like this, lots, as a distillation:
    Dante_80 wrote: »
    threewins wrote: »
    Any other weight loss methods you know about?

    1. Eat less, exercise more. If you cannot exercise, then eat less.
    2. Find a way to eat less that is the most satisfying and easy to follow.

    If I were one of those annoying people who say "boom!" a lot, I'd say it here.

    Maybe it is the way that motivation/determination are defined. Initially, I only typed "motivation" but on second thought added "determination". Because there is a reality where one simply determines to stick to something-- be it easy and most satisfying or not. I don't think that being determined has to really be white knuckling through something.

    I do like to be motivated and excited about a plan, but that comes and goes. But I do find motivation to be a catalyst of sorts. When it is there, it propels me through.
  • LisaGetsMovingLisaGetsMoving Member Posts: 150 Member Member Posts: 150 Member
    Eat Less
    Move More

    Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

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