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Fitness plan for Longevity

DJShivJDJShivJ Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member
Hello All,

I want a plan to get a shredded body or an overall idea of what does fitness means Six-packs or fine fit body without much muscle growth.

Myself DJ, I am 28 years old, working professional with a 9-5 job and an active lifestyle. I workout 3 days in a row and with every 4th day off, starting by either 6-7km running or 30 mins home workout routine or vice versa. My workout routines include core and body strength exercises like burpees, pushups, side planks, mountain run, and so on. I have what it’s called a ‘skinny fat’ body (with no measure arm muscles) and weigh 70kg around all year. Currently, I am on a vegan intermediate fasting diet with no alcoholic drinking, I started it 4 months ago for experimental purposes but before that, I would eat 4 times in a day mostly Indian food (lentils, rice, grain, chicken, eggs) & occasional alcoholic drinks. And that time, I was irregular in exercising too but use to swim 40 mins twice a week and had almost the same kinda physic. Although, I am a bit thinner and less heavy now.

The above was just for your info; therefore, I need a program for longevity I like my workout routine including running and home exercises (I don’t prefer going gym but can use some equipment at home no issues) but would also like to include swimming in the program once we are allowed to go here in Melbourne. And I don’t want to keep intermediate fasting, being vegan, or stop drinking.

Hope this all gives you a better idea of what I am after.

Thank you for listening. Please provide your best answer.

Kindest regards.

Replies

  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator
    From a dietary perspective, having a varied diet, which can contain animal products and plant based foods, while maintaining a healthy and active lifestyle are the best things to help longevity. And Intermittent fasting and being vegan won't guarantee you live any longer, regardless of some of the claims. One big factor that no one talks about is genetics. Typically, if long life is in your family, then you have a greater probably.

    For exercise, you are probably in a good position unless you want to add more muscle. Yes, a home workout can work but its not as optimal as one that includes barbell training.

    But overall, adequate fiber, enough protein (animal sources have complete amino acids profiles), exercise, limit alcohol, don't smoke and have good genetics.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 1,866 Member Member Posts: 1,866 Member
    I honestly think you can do nearly everything right and still get illnesses that can kill you. Yes, you can do certain things that influence your health.

    One thing, backed by science, is that long, slow endurance sessions and (real) HIIT workouts have been shown to keep your telomeres (the protective covering on your DNA) long, which means genetically that you're aging slower. Ironically, scientists found that lifting did nothing for your telomere length. Doesn't mean lifting isn't very important, just that it doesn't keep your DNA from aging.

    I probably drink too much. Most of the research now, for your brain at least, is that you shouldn't drink more than one drink once or twice a week at most. I know I exceed that!
    edited September 14
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator
    I honestly think you can do nearly everything right and still get illnesses that can kill you. Yes, you can do certain things that influence your health.

    One thing, backed by science, is that long, slow endurance sessions and (real) HIIT workouts have been shown to keep your telomeres (the protective covering on your DNA) long, which means genetically that you're aging slower. Ironically, scientists found that lifting did nothing for your telomere length. Doesn't mean lifting isn't very important, just that it doesn't keep your DNA from aging.

    I probably drink too much. Most of the research now, for your brain at least, is that you shouldn't drink more than one drink once or twice a week at most. I know I exceed that!

    The thing to consider is that lifting keeps you strong. Strong bodies are more resilient. Muscle weakness is one of the major reasons why old people get injured.
  • MT1134MT1134 Member Posts: 165 Member Member Posts: 165 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    I honestly think you can do nearly everything right and still get illnesses that can kill you. Yes, you can do certain things that influence your health.

    One thing, backed by science, is that long, slow endurance sessions and (real) HIIT workouts have been shown to keep your telomeres (the protective covering on your DNA) long, which means genetically that you're aging slower. Ironically, scientists found that lifting did nothing for your telomere length. Doesn't mean lifting isn't very important, just that it doesn't keep your DNA from aging.

    I probably drink too much. Most of the research now, for your brain at least, is that you shouldn't drink more than one drink once or twice a week at most. I know I exceed that!

    The thing to consider is that lifting keeps you strong. Strong bodies are more resilient. Muscle weakness is one of the major reasons why old people get injured.

    I agree 100%. As I'm nearing 60, I think most don't understand how important both lifting and flexibility are for your health. I do think some overemphasize lifting over fitness, though.

    Some of the latest research is that it's your brain that causes a lot of older injuries. Your brain's control of your muscles. Healthy diet and certain foods like mushrooms and polyphenols can assist with that. Just keeping fit all of your life goes a long way into brain health.

    What do you mean when you say that some people overemphasize lifting over fitness?

  • DJShivJDJShivJ Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member
    Thank you Mike and P.

    I love to include some weights in the workout and get some strength. Mike, I love the idea of Rowing I have never done it before but will surely try it.

    In regards with adding muscles would spoon a day of Creatine Monohydrate or other type would help?

    And in general, What difference it makes if the diet more protein or carbs Based?
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator
    DJShivJ wrote: »
    Thank you Mike and P.

    I love to include some weights in the workout and get some strength. Mike, I love the idea of Rowing I have never done it before but will surely try it.

    In regards with adding muscles would spoon a day of Creatine Monohydrate or other type would help?

    And in general, What difference it makes if the diet more protein or carbs Based?

    Before even worrying about supplementation, I would focus on getting on a well structure lifting: https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1

    Second, protein vs carbs. Both have their importance. Protein can support muscle retention and a strong body. Carbs have lots of antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and minerals. It's about finding a good balance of proteins, healthy fats and nutrient dense carbs.
  • Diatonic12Diatonic12 Member Posts: 6,414 Member Member Posts: 6,414 Member
    There are many pros and athletes here with sound bodybuilding advice. ^^

    Functional muscles for the WIN. Out here in the wild, wild west you'll find cowboys and cowgirls, ranchers and farmers who've developed their muscles with hard work. These are some of the longest lived peoples. They're wiry and strong even into their 80's. They're a constant source of inspiration for me. Tough and strong and fit with muscles that have to keep working until the day they cross over. Fight for what you want. Find your balance.
  • lynneburgess714lynneburgess714 Member Posts: 4 Member Member Posts: 4 Member
    Yes DJ I agree with what has been said about strength and flexibility being important when you get older especially. I am 63 and do both, I like to mix up my exercise from day to day. My body likes the variety. You are doing well eating a vegan diet, remember to have variety in your vegetables and starch is important too as it gives us energy and stops us from being hungry. Liked the advice about eating healthy fats, avocados and walnuts and other nuts too, and seeds are important. Keep up the good work.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 1,866 Member Member Posts: 1,866 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    DJShivJ wrote: »
    Thank you Mike and P.

    I love to include some weights in the workout and get some strength. Mike, I love the idea of Rowing I have never done it before but will surely try it.

    In regards with adding muscles would spoon a day of Creatine Monohydrate or other type would help?

    And in general, What difference it makes if the diet more protein or carbs Based?

    Before even worrying about supplementation, I would focus on getting on a well structure lifting: https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1

    Second, protein vs carbs. Both have their importance. Protein can support muscle retention and a strong body. Carbs have lots of antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and minerals. It's about finding a good balance of proteins, healthy fats and nutrient dense carbs.

    Great advice. I'd just add to it, since your post is about longevity, that finding balance in life is the key.

    Just like finding an exercise routine that's balanced with cardio, lifting and stretching, life itself is balancing. Not to sound too philosophical, but learning things like meditation and balancing stress, getting enough sleep. Balancing work and life are all keys to living longer.

    When they look at people from Blue Zones (they studied those that lived the longest on the planet) -- they found they not only lived life with balance, but they also lived with purpose and had great social circles.

    Regarding rowing, I love it, but my two adult kids and wife love our AD Pro (Assault style bike) better. The rower, to them, is sheer torture! I'd try out an Echo Rogue Bike first before getting a rower. Personally, I think that appeals more to most people than rowing and it's a great full body workout as well. Just find what you love. My son loves Muay Thai and Brazilian Ju Jitsu (and has competed regionally at both). Both great total body workouts. He'd rather die than sit on a rower. Just find something that you enjoy that works your muscles as you do cardio. There are lots of things that do. Swimming is a great example. You said you love to swim. Mix it up. That's what I do now mostly.
    edited September 15
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,686 MFP Moderator
    psuLemon wrote: »
    DJShivJ wrote: »
    Thank you Mike and P.

    I love to include some weights in the workout and get some strength. Mike, I love the idea of Rowing I have never done it before but will surely try it.

    In regards with adding muscles would spoon a day of Creatine Monohydrate or other type would help?

    And in general, What difference it makes if the diet more protein or carbs Based?

    Before even worrying about supplementation, I would focus on getting on a well structure lifting: https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1

    Second, protein vs carbs. Both have their importance. Protein can support muscle retention and a strong body. Carbs have lots of antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and minerals. It's about finding a good balance of proteins, healthy fats and nutrient dense carbs.

    Great advice. I'd just add to it, since your post is about longevity, that finding balance in life is the key.

    Just like finding an exercise routine that's balanced with cardio, lifting and stretching, life itself is balancing. Not to sound too philosophical, but learning things like meditation and balancing stress, getting enough sleep. Balancing work and life are all keys to living longer.

    When they look at people from Blue Zones (they studied those that lived the longest on the planet) -- they found they not only lived life with balance, but they also lived with purpose and had great social circles.

    Regarding rowing, I love it, but my two adult kids and wife love our AD Pro (Assault style bike) better. The rower, to them, is sheer torture! I'd try out an Echo Rogue Bike first before getting a rower. Personally, I think that appeals more to most people than rowing and it's a great full body workout as well. Just find what you love. My son loves Muay Thai and Brazilian Ju Jitsu (and has competed regionally at both). Both great total body workouts. He'd rather die than sit on a rower. Just find something that you enjoy that works your muscles as you do cardio. There are lots of things that do. Swimming is a great example. You said you love to swim. Mix it up. That's what I do now mostly.

    I luckily have Les Mills bikes at my gym. I definitely agree that cardio and some flexibility training are key. I also include golf and tennis in my routines. Although, i do lift 5x a week.
  • DJShivJDJShivJ Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member
    Sweet, thank you all for giving such valuable advice. I appreciate it a lot. And yes for me it's all about finding the balance and making fitness part of the routine so I don't have to push myself every day to go and do the workout. I want it to be second nature like brushing our teeth. I will look out the lifting and start following the suitable.
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