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Hyperbolic stretching?

VeryKatieVeryKatie Member Posts: 5,714 Member Member Posts: 5,714 Member
I keep seeing ads for Hyperbolic stretching programs online... saying you can get significantly more flexible in 4 weeks.

I tried to do some research online to see if it was a scam but im not sure. I did see that its the same as something called PNF?

Does anyone know anything about it, if its "real" in terms of how to improve flexibility quickly with short daily sessions? Are there free programs similar to it or essentially the same under different names?

Has anyone tried it and actually had good results?

I'm trying to find a flexibility program I can stick to that isn't a waste of time. And when you don't like yoga, these days its hard to find anything else.
edited October 15

Replies

  • lorrpblorrpb Member Posts: 11,320 Member Member Posts: 11,320 Member
    Don’t believe “quick” 4 week miracles🙄
  • yirarayirara Member Posts: 5,418 Member Member Posts: 5,418 Member
    No it doesn't work like that. You might get quite flexible fairly quickly if you happen to have no tight muscles from sitting too much, having a poor posture, flat feet or anything else that might influence the muscles. But most people do have tight muscles, and they require care and time.
  • VeryKatieVeryKatie Member Posts: 5,714 Member Member Posts: 5,714 Member
    yirara wrote: »
    No it doesn't work like that. You might get quite flexible fairly quickly if you happen to have no tight muscles from sitting too much, having a poor posture, flat feet or anything else that might influence the muscles. But most people do have tight muscles, and they require care and time.

    Even if it takes longer, the question is is it effective and faster than yoga type stretching that I dont enjoy? Or are the claims totally false? I'm not saying I only want to put on 4 weeks of effort, I was already aware that from my starting point it would take longer for sure. And obviously there would be upkeep after I reach the goals I have (being able to touch my toes, looser hips, more flexible back/core).
    edited October 15
  • lorrpblorrpb Member Posts: 11,320 Member Member Posts: 11,320 Member
    VeryKatie wrote: »
    yirara wrote: »
    No it doesn't work like that. You might get quite flexible fairly quickly if you happen to have no tight muscles from sitting too much, having a poor posture, flat feet or anything else that might influence the muscles. But most people do have tight muscles, and they require care and time.

    Even if it takes longer, the question is is it effective and faster than yoga type stretching that I dont enjoy? Or are the claims totally false? I'm not saying I only want to put on 4 weeks of effort, I was already aware that from my starting point it would take longer for sure. And obviously there would be upkeep after I reach the goals I have (being able to touch my toes, looser hips, more flexible back/core).

    There are lots of different methods of stretching. I don’t know the one you mention Specifically. Find one you enjoy, nearly any stretching will help you. They key is consistency and gentle progression and reasonable expectations.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 43,292 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 43,292 Member
    "Quick" usually means it's going to be unsafe or possibly harmful. If you've ever pulled a muscle, it's usually because you overstretched it forcefully. So forcefully pushing beyond what you're used to too fast on a stretching program can cause the same. Stretching believe it or not is a form of exercise. Muscles contract or elongate. Stretching is the elongation of the muscle fibers.

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  • VeryKatieVeryKatie Member Posts: 5,714 Member Member Posts: 5,714 Member
    To clarify:

    I understand stretching is its own exercise which requires its own warm up and cool down. I know not to push past safe limits.

    I'm asking if anyone is familiar with Hyperbolic Stretching specifically and if they know if it is the same as PNF (stretch, contract, release) or not... so same as someone might ask pilates or p90x.

    Basically I'm looking for a non-yoga stretching routine, preferably youtube videos i can do at home and looking for recommendations as to how often a stretching routine should be done to allow for me to gain flexibility and mobility without overdoing it. I am also interested in doing a free version if it is under a different name elsewhere. I'm starting out at a much lower limit than pretty much any video online for yoga assumes, plus i just mentally can't get into the whole yoga craze (to each their own)... and they rarely give instructions on modifications for people like me who can barely bend 90 degrees at the hip haha.

    And im thinking the marketed Hyperbolic Stretching program specifically might be a scam since it keeps emphasizing unrealistic time frames... hence looking for less scammy versions...

    But at the same time I'm not looking for programs that waste my time and arent effective in a reasonable time frame. Just like lifting 5lb weights won't help much with building muscle in comparison to heavy lifting. I'd hate to waste years lifting 5lb only to find out later i could have been doing a more effective heavy lifting routine instead with more results.

    Based on the responses so far I have a feeling neither Hyperbolic or PNF are very popular.. which might mean something.
    edited October 17
  • derekoh1234derekoh1234 Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
    check out DDPY on youtube... its yogaish but much more dynamic stretching much less holding single poses.
  • mom23mangosmom23mangos Member Posts: 3,026 Member Member Posts: 3,026 Member
    Yes, from what I’ve seen Hyperbolic stretching is the same as PNF. PNF is effective, but I would look for longer than 4 weeks. Yin Yoga has done more for my flexibility than anything else. If you’ve never tried it, check out done YouTube videos. It’s not like regular yoga. As a plus, it’s very meditative and great before bed.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 16,800 Member Member, Premium Posts: 16,800 Member
    This is also not the answer to your specific question about hyperbolic stretching, but maybe some of your other side questions.

    In my experience, if starting from beginner-hood, or resuming after a long, long hiatus, any responsible kind of stretching can potentially have excellent results, including noticeable results within a month.

    There are numerous videos on YouTube from credentialed (degreed) physical therapists that offer stretches for various body parts, for free. Consider those.

    Personally, I've had better results from a daily gentle stretching practice (same stretches or at least same body parts every day), as opposed to 3-4 times a week.

    I've done a variety of kinds of stretching at different times (static & dynamic regular stretches, static and dynamic yoga, stretches recommended by my own personal physical therapist for specific issues), and had positive results from pretty much all of them, if performed consistently.

    I'm inferring that you don't like slow, meditative kinds of stretching. So, my advice:
    * Pick something else (like PNF stretching).
    * Figure out a time budget for daily stretching (10 minutes or whatever)
    * Identify the body parts/areas that are your first priority to improve.
    * Find videos (YouTube or equivalent) for free, from actual physical therapists to address those body parts/areas.
    * Prioritize those into your time budget.
    * Practice daily.
    * Adjust based on results.

    While the best benefits come from long-term practice (a thing I personally keep dysfunctionally falling in & out of!), of you do this for a month you're likely to have some inkling whether what you're doing is paying off for you, or not, even though you shouldn't IMO expect truly dramatic results in that time period.

    Best wishes!
  • VeryKatieVeryKatie Member Posts: 5,714 Member Member Posts: 5,714 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    This is also not the answer to your specific question about hyperbolic stretching, but maybe some of your other side questions.

    In my experience, if starting from beginner-hood, or resuming after a long, long hiatus, any responsible kind of stretching can potentially have excellent results, including noticeable results within a month.

    There are numerous videos on YouTube from credentialed (degreed) physical therapists that offer stretches for various body parts, for free. Consider those.

    Personally, I've had better results from a daily gentle stretching practice (same stretches or at least same body parts every day), as opposed to 3-4 times a week.

    I've done a variety of kinds of stretching at different times (static & dynamic regular stretches, static and dynamic yoga, stretches recommended by my own personal physical therapist for specific issues), and had positive results from pretty much all of them, if performed consistently.

    I'm inferring that you don't like slow, meditative kinds of stretching. So, my advice:
    * Pick something else (like PNF stretching).
    * Figure out a time budget for daily stretching (10 minutes or whatever)
    * Identify the body parts/areas that are your first priority to improve.
    * Find videos (YouTube or equivalent) for free, from actual physical therapists to address those body parts/areas.
    * Prioritize those into your time budget.
    * Practice daily.
    * Adjust based on results.

    While the best benefits come from long-term practice (a thing I personally keep dysfunctionally falling in & out of!), of you do this for a month you're likely to have some inkling whether what you're doing is paying off for you, or not, even though you shouldn't IMO expect truly dramatic results in that time period.

    Best wishes!

    Thank you!
    I wasn't sure if stretching every day would potentially be "overtraining" but it doesn't sound like it as long as I am careful.

    And you are right, meditation isn't really my thing... I get too into my own head and end up feeling not so great lol.
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