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Dietitians say counting calories bad

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  • Dogmom1978Dogmom1978 Member Posts: 1,293 Member Member Posts: 1,293 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I think I might be glad I do not know what TikTok is.

    -Unhip

    Usually it's short clips of people dancing, eating weird things, or dogs being cute . . . but apparently people are now also using it to dispense nutritional advice.

    I don't know how something can be both "completely unexpected" and "inevitable," but this does it.

    To quantify "short clips" - 15 seconds or less. So, long enough to enjoy animals being cute, but no so much for dispensing quality dietary advice.

    I like the animals being cute part, but I mean, I can get that from Facebook. Seems like a terrible place to get any kind of advice on any subject though
  • bubus05bubus05 Member Posts: 33 Member Member Posts: 33 Member
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    bubus05 wrote: »
    Ohh boy, we have just had a debate about counting calories on a different thread, that went kind of hot. I stated 'counting calories is a waste of time' and I received some backlash some even felt insulted. I still believe it is in itself not enough. It is a great tool to track calorie intake to achive calorie deficit, and if one's calorie deficit is sustainable on the long run it should be off great benefit. What is more important than calorie deficit/calorie counting is the type of calorie one takes in. It can mean the difference between a successful diet or frustration.

    @bubus05 It got hot because of how very incorrect the “advise” you were giving was (which was proven by multiple people on that thread).

    For health, you should obviously try to get enough protein and fat. For losing weight, calorie deficit is all that matters. Carbs aren’t evil. IF you have a health condition where you have to limit certain macros, then yes, you should track those more carefully (a couple of examples: diabetes or kidney disease).

    As said above, for most of us, counting calories works. Most of us don’t have an actual eating disorder. If you do, you are probably underweight and shouldn’t count calories because it will likely trigger more unhealthy eating behaviors.

    OP, based on some of your other threads, I’m going to ask if you have ever talked to a professional. If not, maybe talking to a therapist would be helpful.

    No I have never talked to a professional however that doesn't mean I can't read or listen to professionals. By the way there is no need to be personal about this I consider everyone a friend here after all we are all interested in how diets work or dont work that's some common ground isn't it.
    I pointed out a calorie deficit or calorie extra intake for that matter will influence one's metabolism, this is proven by multiple studies and experts, therefore equally as important-as calorie counting- if not more so is what one will consume. How am I wrong?
  • Mellouk89Mellouk89 Member Posts: 137 Member Member Posts: 137 Member
    So what do you do when you're eating out and there is no nutrition label? What if you buy meals at the grocery store and it has no information on macros?

    It happens regularly in my case. Almost everyday
    edited November 18
  • goal06082021goal06082021 Member Posts: 23 Member Member Posts: 23 Member
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    So what do you do when you're eating out and there is no nutrition label? What if you buy meals at the grocery store and it has no information on macros?

    It happens regularly in my case. Almost everyday

    Maybe...stop buying mystery meals from the grocery store? I don't know where you live, but surely your grocery store makes nutrition information available for their prepackaged foods somewhere.

    For restaurant food - most chain restaurants, at this point, make their nutrition information available online. If you're supporting small local places, they may not have their nutrition info available, but you can still approximate your meal with what's already in the database for the most part. There's a limit to how many calories a restaurant can pack into a meal, it's not unknowable.

    If cooking for yourself or buying your food from large chains are not feasible for you, then I don't know what to tell you.

    To address the OP: +1 suggestion to not get your nutrition advice from TikTok. "Dietitian," in particular, is actually a protected title in the US (not sure about other places) - you need a license to call yourself that, and I'd be very skeptical of licensed dietitians out here working for free, especially on a social media app. That said, it is possible for people who already have or are developing a disordered relationship with food to fixate on calorie-counting such that it harms more than it helps in achieving their goals. The problem there is the disordered eating, though, not the calorie counting in and of itself. There are also people who don't do well with "intuitive eating," also due to mental health struggles like executive dysfunction or a disordered relationship with food - neither approach to health and nutrition is categorically better or worse, it's about what works for the individual.
  • breefosheebreefoshee Member Posts: 371 Member Member Posts: 371 Member
    I definitely think it depends on the person. Some people can log and have really healthy outlooks when they go over their calories or just in their relation to food in general.

    I've noticed that I, personally, have more consistent losses and a healthier relationship with food when I don't log. I just become obsessed with the numbers and accuracy to an unhealthy point. I obsess over everything that doesn't fit in my calories. I get frustrated when my numbers don't equate to loss because, even if I went over, I feel like I am working really hard mentally.

    I do keep a mental estimate based on passed logging and I check calories on things that I don't have any ideas about. This has made it easier for me and I have consistently lost weight every month since doing this.
  • charmmethcharmmeth Member Posts: 635 Member Member Posts: 635 Member
    I have found that counting calories, not obsessively but in search of accurate information about my eating habits, has been the only thing that helped me to counter weight gain. I would think I was eating a sensible balanced diet and consuming a reasonable amount; then I would put it into mfp and see that the calories were far higher than I had been thinking. I don't think it matters what you do to understand how your eating habits relate to your weight, but if you want to lose weight you will need to understand that relationship. Counting calories did it for me.
  • bubus05bubus05 Member Posts: 33 Member Member Posts: 33 Member
    jamloche wrote: »
    bubus05 wrote: »
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    bubus05 wrote: »
    Ohh boy, we have just had a debate about counting calories on a different thread, that went kind of hot. I stated 'counting calories is a waste of time' and I received some backlash some even felt insulted. I still believe it is in itself not enough. It is a great tool to track calorie intake to achive calorie deficit, and if one's calorie deficit is sustainable on the long run it should be off great benefit. What is more important than calorie deficit/calorie counting is the type of calorie one takes in. It can mean the difference between a successful diet or frustration.

    @bubus05 It got hot because of how very incorrect the “advise” you were giving was (which was proven by multiple people on that thread).

    For health, you should obviously try to get enough protein and fat. For losing weight, calorie deficit is all that matters. Carbs aren’t evil. IF you have a health condition where you have to limit certain macros, then yes, you should track those more carefully (a couple of examples: diabetes or kidney disease).

    As said above, for most of us, counting calories works. Most of us don’t have an actual eating disorder. If you do, you are probably underweight and shouldn’t count calories because it will likely trigger more unhealthy eating behaviors.

    OP, based on some of your other threads, I’m going to ask if you have ever talked to a professional. If not, maybe talking to a therapist would be helpful.

    No I have never talked to a professional however that doesn't mean I can't read or listen to professionals. By the way there is no need to be personal about this I consider everyone a friend here after all we are all interested in how diets work or dont work that's some common ground isn't it.
    I pointed out a calorie deficit or calorie extra intake for that matter will influence one's metabolism, this is proven by multiple studies and experts, therefore equally as important-as calorie counting- if not more so is what one will consume. How am I wrong?

    I admire your tenacity, @bubus05 ... but as of this minute, you have 23 total posts on MFP, and 210 disagrees. That's plain amazing to me. Now I'm not saying that proves or disproves anything about your beliefs, but you've definitely found yourself a hot topic. You must understand by now that people here are going to challenge you every time you bring it up.

    In a weird way I kind of like to be challenged I dont take anything here personally, we agree to disagree there is nothing wrong with that. Yes most will disagree with me but I dont mind. Everything that I wrote here is based on
    experience. The why and how is based on research, now I might be missing something or misunderstand something quite possible I am no expert myself. I think that most will agree that depending on what one eats will influence one's metabolism. The question is how or at what point during diet. IMHO a simply reduced calorie intake with no regards to the type of calorie one eats is not the best most effective method, if it is not sustainable. If it is sustainable no worries the pounds one lost will remain lost regardless of the diet being on high carb low carb whatever kind of diet. I am not advocating against 'counting the calories' but try to point out that a simply reduced calorie diet may not get you the results you want or that long term may not be sustainable. Here is the science parthttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3673773/
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