Calorie Counter

Message Boards Food and Nutrition
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Iron supplement?

Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 130 Member Member Posts: 130 Member
I know that this a medical question, but just wanting to hear others' opinion/thoughts on the matter. I notice that almost every day that I don't come close to hitting my iron intake for the day. I don't eat a lot of the foods that are high in them, except for spinach and other dark leafy greens and a very small amount of nuts. I eat about 110 g of protein a day, but apparently not from sources that have a lot of iron. I've never had my iron tested, but my hemoglobin values are normal. I used to take a multi-vitamin, but stopped because thought I probably didn't need it and trying to give my kidneys a break. Wondering if I should take an iron supplement (even though I know it can be hard on the stomach), esp. as a woman, or even just go back to taking the multi.
«1

Replies

  • rosebarnalicerosebarnalice Member Posts: 2,952 Member Member Posts: 2,952 Member
    Ditto @SuzySunshine99 . I was concerned about low protein and iron intake when I transitioned to a plant-based diet, but regular bloodwork (+- 6 mos) has never identified a deficiency with either in more than 3 years
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter, Premium Posts: 43,643 Member Member, Greeter, Premium Posts: 43,643 Member
    NEVER take an iron supplement unless you have had blood work that shows you are deficient. Too much iron can lead to very serious medical problems. If you are concerned about it, ask your doctor for a blood draw. But, don't just start taking a supplement on your own.

    With some vitamins or minerals, having more than you need doesn't really cause any problems. That is not the case with iron.

    Agree here. Iron can become toxic in your blood.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • TeaBeaTeaBea Member Posts: 14,394 Member Member Posts: 14,394 Member
    I tested anemic and was prescribed iron by a doctor, so I keep an eye on things. If you're curious, give blood and you will be tested.

    I agree with the NEVER comments. The lowest dose commonly available is way more than 100% of the RDA, AND food you eat already contains iron.

    Also consider that many of the entries here don't include all of the micronutrients. Many entries are incomplete.
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 130 Member Member Posts: 130 Member
    Thanks everyone. I never even would've considered it if I hadn't looked at the micronutrients at the end of the day. I don't really show any symptoms, other than my nails suddenly becoming weak (which could be attributed to many things).
  • AndreaTamiraAndreaTamira Member, Premium Posts: 190 Member Member, Premium Posts: 190 Member
    Thanks everyone. I never even would've considered it if I hadn't looked at the micronutrients at the end of the day. I don't really show any symptoms, other than my nails suddenly becoming weak (which could be attributed to many things).

    If you are worried, get tested. - I did about a year ago as a routine thing (no symptoms I was aware off) and I was borderline. I've been taking supplements since then, first strong subscription ones and now a lot weaker ones the doctor approved off but did not prescribe, and my iron levels are nicely in the green again. - The strong ones may have been the cause of some horrid acid reflux, though.
    edited January 11
  • kcrowley21kcrowley21 Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member
    I was worried that my iron levels were low because per the nutrition info, I was never getting enough iron and I am religious about tracking food and making sure everything is recorded. I just had my annual physical and the bloodwork showed my iron levels were fine (my Vitamin D however was very low and so the symptoms I thought might be from an iron deficiency were actually from a Vitamin D deficiency). Do not rely on the nutrition info even if you track everything...get tested and talk to your doctor.
  • Kaysmile012015Kaysmile012015 Member Posts: 51 Member Member Posts: 51 Member
    Best to get bloodwork and confirm,especially if you don't have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. I have symptoms like pica, and I had bloodwork done( in which I habitually test low iron levels) I supplement and make sure I eat enough iron rich foods however, like you said that's not so easy...but fun fact Cherrios, Chex, and Raisinbrand cereals have LOADS of iron per serving, like half RDA, however personally im not always willing to spare the calories.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,138 Member Member Posts: 23,138 Member
    Thanks everyone. I never even would've considered it if I hadn't looked at the micronutrients at the end of the day. I don't really show any symptoms, other than my nails suddenly becoming weak (which could be attributed to many things).

    If you are worried, get tested. - I did about a year ago as a routine thing (no symptoms I was aware off) and I was borderline. I've been taking supplements since then, first strong subscription ones and now a lot weaker ones the doctor approved off but did not prescribe, and my iron levels are nicely in the green again. - The strong ones may have been the cause of some horrid acid reflux, though.

    Yes, I ended up in Urgent Care after my doctor over-prescribed Ferrous Gluconate. Worse pain in my life. In too much pain to roll over and get pain meds.

    I'm back to iron bisglycinate, which has never, ever caused gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,138 Member Member Posts: 23,138 Member
    Thanks everyone. I never even would've considered it if I hadn't looked at the micronutrients at the end of the day. I don't really show any symptoms, other than my nails suddenly becoming weak (which could be attributed to many things).

    Do get tested.

    I'm anemic and always look at iron values for user-created entries. They are frequently wrong.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,138 Member Member Posts: 23,138 Member
    Best to get bloodwork and confirm,especially if you don't have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. I have symptoms like pica, and I had bloodwork done( in which I habitually test low iron levels) I supplement and make sure I eat enough iron rich foods however, like you said that's not so easy...but fun fact Cherrios, Chex, and Raisinbrand cereals have LOADS of iron per serving, like half RDA, however personally im not always willing to spare the calories.

    Cereal grains do not contain these amounts of iron naturally - some brands are FORTIFIED, which means the manufacturer just throws in whatever cheap form of iron they can get. IME it's better to just take a supplement.

    I tried Total (my OH eats) and Grape Nuts (my brother eats) recently. One serving contains 70% and 90% of the iron RDA, respectively. I felt dizzy and weird after both of them, and have stopped eating them.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 38,471 Member Member Posts: 38,471 Member
    Thanks everyone. I never even would've considered it if I hadn't looked at the micronutrients at the end of the day. I don't really show any symptoms, other than my nails suddenly becoming weak (which could be attributed to many things).

    MFP is great for tracking calories and macro nutrients...it's not particularly good for accurately tracking micro nutrients as entries are crowdsourced and often incomplete or just plain wrong.

    Never take an iron supplement unless your Dr. has deemed it necessary due to blood work showing deficiency.
  • Kaysmile012015Kaysmile012015 Member Posts: 51 Member Member Posts: 51 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Best to get bloodwork and confirm,especially if you don't have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. I have symptoms like pica, and I had bloodwork done( in which I habitually test low iron levels) I supplement and make sure I eat enough iron rich foods however, like you said that's not so easy...but fun fact Cherrios, Chex, and Raisinbrand cereals have LOADS of iron per serving, like half RDA, however personally im not always willing to spare the calories.

    Cereal grains do not contain these amounts of iron naturally - some brands are FORTIFIED, which means the manufacturer just throws in whatever cheap form of iron they can get. IME it's better to just take a supplement.

    I tried Total (my OH eats) and Grape Nuts (my brother eats) recently. One serving contains 70% and 90% of the iron RDA, respectively. I felt dizzy and weird after both of them, and have stopped eating them.

    Yikes, didn't know this, luckily I can't eat cereal like a lady (I eat double, triple portions) so I don't often buy it. This is definitely good to know.
  • lorrpblorrpb Member Posts: 11,401 Member Member Posts: 11,401 Member
    It’s possible that the diary entries font accurately reflect your iron intake. It might be worth double checking your chosen entries.
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 130 Member Member Posts: 130 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Thanks everyone. I never even would've considered it if I hadn't looked at the micronutrients at the end of the day. I don't really show any symptoms, other than my nails suddenly becoming weak (which could be attributed to many things).

    MFP is great for tracking calories and macro nutrients...it's not particularly good for accurately tracking micro nutrients as entries are crowdsourced and often incomplete or just plain wrong.

    Never take an iron supplement unless your Dr. has deemed it necessary due to blood work showing deficiency.

    Yeah, I think this is the problem. I'd say maybe half of what I eat (if that) has iron %age listed, others are recipes and such that don't have it listed.

    I just donated blood, and while I always feel a bit woozy on that day, I feel generally OK afterwards. Not that that is really an accurate marker, but my hemoglobin is apparently good, too.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,550 Member Member Posts: 8,550 Member
    Another thing to be aware of if you're a man or a postmenopausal woman is that the 100% RDA goal on food labels is for premenopausal women. The RDA for a man or a postmenopausal woman is a little less than half that for a premenopausal woman (roughly 45%).
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,138 Member Member Posts: 23,138 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Best to get bloodwork and confirm,especially if you don't have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. I have symptoms like pica, and I had bloodwork done( in which I habitually test low iron levels) I supplement and make sure I eat enough iron rich foods however, like you said that's not so easy...but fun fact Cherrios, Chex, and Raisinbrand cereals have LOADS of iron per serving, like half RDA, however personally im not always willing to spare the calories.

    Cereal grains do not contain these amounts of iron naturally - some brands are FORTIFIED, which means the manufacturer just throws in whatever cheap form of iron they can get. IME it's better to just take a supplement.

    I tried Total (my OH eats) and Grape Nuts (my brother eats) recently. One serving contains 70% and 90% of the iron RDA, respectively. I felt dizzy and weird after both of them, and have stopped eating them.

    Yikes, didn't know this, luckily I can't eat cereal like a lady (I eat double, triple portions) so I don't often buy it. This is definitely good to know.

    I used to never eat cereal either, but I've recently found that if one serving has at least 4 g of fiber, and I have 40 g raspberries, for another 3 g of fiber, one serving of cereal does keep me full for relatively few calories.

    I'm currently eating various types of Nature's Path cereal, which does not have the crazy amount of iron added to it.
  • socajamsocajam Member, Premium Posts: 2,505 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,505 Member
    I know that this a medical question, but just wanting to hear others' opinion/thoughts on the matter. I notice that almost every day that I don't come close to hitting my iron intake for the day. I don't eat a lot of the foods that are high in them, except for spinach and other dark leafy greens and a very small amount of nuts. I eat about 110 g of protein a day, but apparently not from sources that have a lot of iron. I've never had my iron tested, but my hemoglobin values are normal. I used to take a multi-vitamin, but stopped because thought I probably didn't need it and trying to give my kidneys a break. Wondering if I should take an iron supplement (even though I know it can be hard on the stomach), esp. as a woman, or even just go back to taking the multi.

    Depending on where you live, I think you should be more worried about Vitamin D3
  • Kaysmile012015Kaysmile012015 Member Posts: 51 Member Member Posts: 51 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Best to get bloodwork and confirm,especially if you don't have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. I have symptoms like pica, and I had bloodwork done( in which I habitually test low iron levels) I supplement and make sure I eat enough iron rich foods however, like you said that's not so easy...but fun fact Cherrios, Chex, and Raisinbrand cereals have LOADS of iron per serving, like half RDA, however personally im not always willing to spare the calories.

    Cereal grains do not contain these amounts of iron naturally - some brands are FORTIFIED, which means the manufacturer just throws in whatever cheap form of iron they can get. IME it's better to just take a supplement.

    I tried Total (my OH eats) and Grape Nuts (my brother eats) recently. One serving contains 70% and 90% of the iron RDA, respectively. I felt dizzy and weird after both of them, and have stopped eating them.

    Yikes, didn't know this, luckily I can't eat cereal like a lady (I eat double, triple portions) so I don't often buy it. This is definitely good to know.

    I used to never eat cereal either, but I've recently found that if one serving has at least 4 g of fiber, and I have 40 g raspberries, for another 3 g of fiber, one serving of cereal does keep me full for relatively few calories.

    I'm currently eating various types of Nature's Path cereal, which does not have the crazy amount of iron added to it.

    Im going to try this..now, does it need to be raspberries( they can be pricey when not in season) or can I do like wild blueberries?What type of fruit substitutes would you suggest?Or do the raspberries work the best? If yes I'll just do them.
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 130 Member Member Posts: 130 Member
    socajam wrote: »
    I know that this a medical question, but just wanting to hear others' opinion/thoughts on the matter. I notice that almost every day that I don't come close to hitting my iron intake for the day. I don't eat a lot of the foods that are high in them, except for spinach and other dark leafy greens and a very small amount of nuts. I eat about 110 g of protein a day, but apparently not from sources that have a lot of iron. I've never had my iron tested, but my hemoglobin values are normal. I used to take a multi-vitamin, but stopped because thought I probably didn't need it and trying to give my kidneys a break. Wondering if I should take an iron supplement (even though I know it can be hard on the stomach), esp. as a woman, or even just go back to taking the multi.

    Depending on where you live, I think you should be more worried about Vitamin D3

    I live in the midwest, so that could be a concern. My previous doctor used to test for it, but it seems my current dr doesn't. My husband (who still goes to the old doctor) actually has to take vitamin D supplement now--and he enjoys being outdoors more than me, even in cold weather.

    Mini-rant off-topic: I don't know why vitamin D is something doctors/insurance companies won't test for/allow more regularly, especially in older adults. My 73-year old mother wasn't tested regularly at her dr's office (apparently Medicare doesn't consider it necessary???)...until she broke her ankle this past spring. Surprise, surprise--her vitamin D levels were low.
Sign In or Register to comment.