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Sick of these chatty cathies during workout classes

spartan_dspartan_d Member Posts: 726 Member Member Posts: 726 Member
I'm really sick of these women who keep yakking, yakking, yakking during my workout classes. If you want to talk, do so after the class, not during a set.

(Yes, I said "women." I know this isn't politically correct, but for whatever reason, the men never do this sort of thing. It's always a group of women who can't shut up during the workout routine. Most of the women don't, but there's often a significant number whose mouths won't stop.)

A lot of people don't understand why this is a problem. "People need a time to socialize!" they say. Or worse, they say "If you find this distracting, that's your problem. Focus on what you're doing, not what others are doing." (Um, it's called "distracting" precisely because it does prevent others from focusing, morons.)
edited January 14
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Replies

  • socajamsocajam Member, Premium Posts: 2,505 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,505 Member
    SnifterPug wrote: »
    I used to do water aerobics and there was a group there who would not shut up. That in itself did not bother me particularly but they also did not actually do any exercise, just stood there and chatted. That was annoying because the classes were over subscribed and hard to get into. They were taking places from those who would actually have participated. The most annoying, however, was that they used to glare and complain when those participating followed instructions to jump, resulting in their hair getting splashed.

    This is where if I was the Instructor I would ask them: are you interested in working out or just socializing because there are others who would love to change places with you?
  • spartan_dspartan_d Member Posts: 726 Member Member Posts: 726 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    spartan_d wrote: »
    I'm really sick of these women who keep yakking, yakking, yakking during my workout classes. If you want to talk, do so after the class, not during a set.

    (Yes, I said "women." I know this isn't politically correct, but for whatever reason, the men never do this sort of thing. It's always a group of women who can't shut up during the workout routine. Most of the women don't, but there's often a significant number whose mouths won't stop.)

    A lot of people don't understand why this is a problem. "People need a time to socialize!" they say. Or worse, they say "If you find this distracting, that's your problem. Focus on what you're doing, not what others are doing." (Um, it's called "distracting" precisely because it does prevent others from focusing, morons.)

    I beg to differ. Over 40 years of training and men do this sort of thing as well. Sounds as if you might be less tolerant or interested in their banter.
    Our experiences are certainly different. I have seen men converse during their personal workouts, but I have never seen them engage in extended conversations during a workout class. That is entirely different. (My Google search shows various other people observing these talky-talkies, and in every single case, they're complaining about women.)

    As for being interested in their banter... that's completely irrelevant. Even if I were interested in their topic of conversation, I would still consider this to be rude. If you're in the class, pay attention to the instructor and don't distract the people around you.

    As @socajam said, there are other times at which people can have their personal conversations.
    edited January 14
  • cmriversidecmriverside Member Posts: 30,744 Member Member Posts: 30,744 Member
    So.

    I am a woman and women are chatty. Is this the first time you've noticed that? I mean it kinda seems like a given that a group exercise class with women is gonna be chatty.

    Find a way to live in peace with chatty women. That's where your Power lies. I don't think we're going to change much.

  • dbanks80dbanks80 Member Posts: 3,657 Member Member Posts: 3,657 Member
    It is very rude and disrespectful. Instructors need to instruct, explain good form, and motivate the participants. People work out to get the most out of the class and benefit. Those that want to just talk throughout the session need to be kicked out of the class and go to the cafe if they want to just socialize.

    My trainer would NEVER tolerate that and probably would give a few choice words. LOL
  • spartan_dspartan_d Member Posts: 726 Member Member Posts: 726 Member
    dbanks80 wrote: »
    Is this an instructor led class? If so, I am shocked the class instructor has not said anything.

    I think this instructor has just given up. I've known other instructors who have said that it's a losing battle.

    @cmriverside... YES, women can be chatty. That is no excuse. Most women are still respectful toward the instructor. The fault lies entirely on the shoulders of the offenders, not the innocent bystanders who are forced to endure this rudeness.

  • jeri30jeri30 Member Posts: 19 Member Member Posts: 19 Member
    They need to shut up or the instructor needs to kick them out of the class (it's disrespectful to the instructor and the other students too who paid to be there and not distracted by their chatter; if they want to talk so badly they go to a cafe and talk or put on an exercise dvd at home they can all enjoy while talking) esp if they are not wearing masks, which I doubt they are. They are increasing the risk of passing COVID 19 on by doing this.

    From https://www.healthline.com/health-news/heres-why-covid-19-can-spread-so-easily-at-gyms-and-fitness-classes#Take-your-workouts-outdoors

    Here’s how COVID-19 can spread at the gym

    One of the main concerns health experts have about COVID-19 is how readily it can spread through the air via respiratory droplets, especially in confined spaces.

    Researchers from South Korea recently warned people against rigorously exercising in confined spaces like fitness studios.

    For an early release report published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Korean researchers looked at a confirmed case of COVID-19 and eventually traced consecutive confirmed cases back to a nationwide fitness dance class.

    Ultimately, the research team found 112 COVID-19 cases linked to dance workout classes across 12 different facilities.

    According to the researchers, the moist, warm air combined with turbulent air flow from exercising may create an environment in which droplets can spread readily.

    “Based on recent research, aerosolized droplets can remain airborne for up to 3 hours, making the potential for spread in crowded and confined spaces such as fitness studios problematic,” said Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency medicine physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

    The size and intensity of the class can also impact transmission.

    According to the study, transmission was detected in fitness classes that were about 50 minutes long, were held in a studio measuring around 645 square feet, and included anywhere from 5 to 22 people.

    People breathe harder when they work out, which is the prime way the virus spreads from person to person.

    “When people breathe more rapidly and more deeply, they expel greater numbers of droplets,” Glatter said.

    Keep in mind that even if people who have COVID-19 don’t have symptoms, they can still spread the disease.

    Dr. Anne Liu, infectious disease physician with Stanford Health Care, said people are most infectious the day before, day of, and a couple of days after developing symptoms. They can even transmit the virus several days before symptoms appear, Liu noted.

    If a person is asymptomatic or presymptomatic, they can expel viral particles into the air through droplets that can become aerosolized, according to Glatter.

    “This increases the potential of transmission among people in hot and crowded fitness studios with poor air circulation,” Glatter said.

    Here's a link to the study itself: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/26/8/20-0633_article

    There's been other outbreaks traced back to fitness classes too.
  • cmriversidecmriverside Member Posts: 30,744 Member Member Posts: 30,744 Member
    spartan_d wrote: »
    dbanks80 wrote: »
    Is this an instructor led class? If so, I am shocked the class instructor has not said anything.

    I think this instructor has just given up. I've known other instructors who have said that it's a losing battle.

    @cmriverside... YES, women can be chatty. That is no excuse. Most women are still respectful toward the instructor. The fault lies entirely on the shoulders of the offenders, not the innocent bystanders who are forced to endure this rudeness.

    I understand if it's an over the top situation and only you really know how bad it is. I've never witnessed something that disrupts the whole class. If that's the case (and I apologize if I didn't understand, but it's hard to get a grasp on something in one or two paragraphs) then I'd take it above the instructors' head and speak to management.

    If the instructor isn't taking control, yeah, that's not cool.
  • spartan_dspartan_d Member Posts: 726 Member Member Posts: 726 Member
    Then have a conversation with them before or after class. A polite conversation...i.e. don't call them morons.

    Say, "Could I ask you a favor? When you have conversations during class, it makes it hard to pay attention to the instructor. Out of respect for the instructor and the other people in class, could you save your conversations for after class?"

    Ideally, the instructor would be saying this. Anyway, most people are totally oblivious to how their behavior affects other people. There's a good chance that these woman have no idea they are bothering anyone because it has never been brought up to them.

    It might be hard for you to "ask" in such a nice way, but this is taking the high road instead of ranting about it on public message boards.

    From past experience, I know that some gyms do NOT want the participants confronting other participants, due to the potential for unpleasant conflicts and possibly losing members. They ask the gym members to leave this to the staff.

    Whether the staff takes action or not is another thing. As I've said, sometimes instructors have determined that certain people just won't change. I know that in this case, the instructor did tell the offenders to keep quiet at the start of the class, but it didn't take long for them to resume the gabbery.

    BTW, that shoots down the whole "it hasn't been brought up to them" theory down. They were told to keep quiet, but that didn't last for long. Based on various online discussions that I've seen, this is pretty common.
    edited January 14
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 1,991 Member Member Posts: 1,991 Member
    spartan_d wrote: »
    Then have a conversation with them before or after class. A polite conversation...i.e. don't call them morons.

    Say, "Could I ask you a favor? When you have conversations during class, it makes it hard to pay attention to the instructor. Out of respect for the instructor and the other people in class, could you save your conversations for after class?"

    Ideally, the instructor would be saying this. Anyway, most people are totally oblivious to how their behavior affects other people. There's a good chance that these woman have no idea they are bothering anyone because it has never been brought up to them.

    It might be hard for you to "ask" in such a nice way, but this is taking the high road instead of ranting about it on public message boards.

    From past experience, I know that some gyms do NOT want the participants confronting other participants, due to the potential for unpleasant conflicts and possibly losing members. They ask the gym members to leave this to the staff.

    Whether the staff takes action or not is another thing. As I've said, sometimes instructors have determined that certain people just won't change. I know that in this case, the instructor did tell the offenders to keep quiet at the start of the class, but it didn't take long for them to resume the gabbery.

    That's why I suggested the most unconfrontational way of saying it. By not accusing them of anything, but asking for a favor politely. If they react negatively, at least you tried. Maybe if they hear it from a fellow classmate, MAYBE the might keep it down a little?
  • spartan_dspartan_d Member Posts: 726 Member Member Posts: 726 Member
    spartan_d wrote: »
    Then have a conversation with them before or after class. A polite conversation...i.e. don't call them morons.

    Say, "Could I ask you a favor? When you have conversations during class, it makes it hard to pay attention to the instructor. Out of respect for the instructor and the other people in class, could you save your conversations for after class?"

    Ideally, the instructor would be saying this. Anyway, most people are totally oblivious to how their behavior affects other people. There's a good chance that these woman have no idea they are bothering anyone because it has never been brought up to them.

    It might be hard for you to "ask" in such a nice way, but this is taking the high road instead of ranting about it on public message boards.

    From past experience, I know that some gyms do NOT want the participants confronting other participants, due to the potential for unpleasant conflicts and possibly losing members. They ask the gym members to leave this to the staff.

    Whether the staff takes action or not is another thing. As I've said, sometimes instructors have determined that certain people just won't change. I know that in this case, the instructor did tell the offenders to keep quiet at the start of the class, but it didn't take long for them to resume the gabbery.

    That's why I suggested the most unconfrontational way of saying it. By not accusing them of anything, but asking for a favor politely. If they react negatively, at least you tried. Maybe if they hear it from a fellow classmate, MAYBE the might keep it down a little?

    Yeah, I appreciate the fact that you proposed a gentle approach. Many gyms still don't want that.

    Heck, I was in a gym once where I simply pointed out to someone that she was walking in one of the runners-only track lanes. She tried to report me to the management. Even a gentle approach will often fail when it comes to rude people. (To their credit, the management did blow her complaint off.)

    Heck, early in this discussion, someone asked "Why should you care? It's their workout too." Rude people will often take that exact attitude too.

    And remember... in this case, the offenders kept talking even after the instructor asked them to keep quiet. If they are going to ignore the instructor, then there is very little chance that they would heed the words of another participant. More likely than not, they would say, "We're paying members too. Who are you to tell us what to do?"
    edited January 14
  • socajamsocajam Member, Premium Posts: 2,505 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,505 Member
    Then have a conversation with them before or after class. A polite conversation...i.e. don't call them morons.

    Say, "Could I ask you a favor? When you have conversations during class, it makes it hard to pay attention to the instructor. Out of respect for the instructor and the other people in class, could you save your conversations for after class?"

    Ideally, the instructor would be saying this. Anyway, most people are totally oblivious to how their behavior affects other people. There's a good chance that these woman have no idea they are bothering anyone because it has never been brought up to them.

    It might be hard for you to "ask" in such a nice way, but this is taking the high road instead of ranting about it on public message boards.

    If you have to ask these "morons" to be quiet, then they need to stay home or the instructor need to grow a spine and call them out in front of everyone like:

    Ladies if you are here to work out welcome, but if you are only here to socialize, then you have come to the wrong class - please decide NOW

  • socajamsocajam Member, Premium Posts: 2,505 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,505 Member
    spartan_d wrote: »
    Then have a conversation with them before or after class. A polite conversation...i.e. don't call them morons.

    Say, "Could I ask you a favor? When you have conversations during class, it makes it hard to pay attention to the instructor. Out of respect for the instructor and the other people in class, could you save your conversations for after class?"

    Ideally, the instructor would be saying this. Anyway, most people are totally oblivious to how their behavior affects other people. There's a good chance that these woman have no idea they are bothering anyone because it has never been brought up to them.

    It might be hard for you to "ask" in such a nice way, but this is taking the high road instead of ranting about it on public message boards.

    From past experience, I know that some gyms do NOT want the participants confronting other participants, due to the potential for unpleasant conflicts and possibly losing members. They ask the gym members to leave this to the staff.

    Whether the staff takes action or not is another thing. As I've said, sometimes instructors have determined that certain people just won't change. I know that in this case, the instructor did tell the offenders to keep quiet at the start of the class, but it didn't take long for them to resume the gabbery.

    That's why I suggested the most unconfrontational way of saying it. By not accusing them of anything, but asking for a favor politely. If they react negatively, at least you tried. Maybe if they hear it from a fellow classmate, MAYBE the might keep it down a little?

    Why should someone ask for a favor from rude individual(s) who should know better, but think the world revolves around them
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