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Worst part of deadlifting is...

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  • Elcee2020Elcee2020 Member Posts: 2,357 Member Member Posts: 2,357 Member
    t8kjp25a16kt.jpg

    Getting the form right is the hardest for me.🙂
    edited March 31
  • mreichardmreichard Member Posts: 237 Member Member Posts: 237 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    elsie_fair wrote: »
    sgt1372 wrote: »

    The 2nd best thing to use is a cheap pair of car jack stands, which if you do any work on your car(s), you probably already have lying around.

    What a great idea I hadn't thought of that! I've really been wanting a deadlift jack but I'm totally stealing my hubbies car jacks tomorrow 😆

    Better yet is a belt or or something easy to roll on that is half inch thick or so. Jack's require lifting compared to simply rolling.

    I don’t have a belt, so I use a 2.5# plate under the innermost 45.
  • stephie_nycstephie_nyc Member Posts: 87 Member Member Posts: 87 Member
    Peeing yourself while pulling sumo.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 463 Member Member Posts: 463 Member
    Worse than explosively passing gas mid rep!
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,802 Member Member Posts: 8,802 Member
    mreichard wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    elsie_fair wrote: »
    sgt1372 wrote: »

    The 2nd best thing to use is a cheap pair of car jack stands, which if you do any work on your car(s), you probably already have lying around.

    What a great idea I hadn't thought of that! I've really been wanting a deadlift jack but I'm totally stealing my hubbies car jacks tomorrow 😆

    Better yet is a belt or or something easy to roll on that is half inch thick or so. Jack's require lifting compared to simply rolling.

    I don’t have a belt, so I use a 2.5# plate under the innermost 45.

    Did that many times over the years. The only problem I have is it eventually can "crack" the weight which is expensive to replace.

    Another alternative is a old thinner paperback book if that is a concern.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 463 Member Member Posts: 463 Member
    Would your training partner’s foot work in a bind?
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 44,775 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 44,775 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    elsie_fair wrote: »
    sgt1372 wrote: »

    The 2nd best thing to use is a cheap pair of car jack stands, which if you do any work on your car(s), you probably already have lying around.

    What a great idea I hadn't thought of that! I've really been wanting a deadlift jack but I'm totally stealing my hubbies car jacks tomorrow 😆

    Better yet is a belt or or something easy to roll on that is half inch thick or so. Jack's require lifting compared to simply rolling.

    Belt? Maybe a DIY "Dead Wedge" made of wood but not likely a belt. The Dead Wedge (or equivalent) would be much better.

    I also think it's curious that you'd complain about lifting a bar (1 side at a time) to place on jack stands. You are deadlfiting afterall. LOL!



    I'm not "complaining", Not only is it easier and faster but zero chance of damaging the barbell.

    Wedges can be used but if you already have a belt, purchasing and dragging gadgets around isn't necessary.

    If a person is using 4-5 bumper plates or many iron plates there can be a problem with the ability to grip both hands on the end of a barbell.

    Here is a vid of the ease of rolling I made years ago. Not only is it faster but again no chance of danaging expensive barbell.

    I use a 2.5 plate since it's small and less likely for the barbell to roll off of.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,802 Member Member Posts: 8,802 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    elsie_fair wrote: »
    sgt1372 wrote: »

    The 2nd best thing to use is a cheap pair of car jack stands, which if you do any work on your car(s), you probably already have lying around.

    What a great idea I hadn't thought of that! I've really been wanting a deadlift jack but I'm totally stealing my hubbies car jacks tomorrow 😆

    Better yet is a belt or or something easy to roll on that is half inch thick or so. Jack's require lifting compared to simply rolling.

    Belt? Maybe a DIY "Dead Wedge" made of wood but not likely a belt. The Dead Wedge (or equivalent) would be much better.

    I also think it's curious that you'd complain about lifting a bar (1 side at a time) to place on jack stands. You are deadlfiting afterall. LOL!



    I'm not "complaining", Not only is it easier and faster but zero chance of damaging the barbell.

    Wedges can be used but if you already have a belt, purchasing and dragging gadgets around isn't necessary.

    If a person is using 4-5 bumper plates or many iron plates there can be a problem with the ability to grip both hands on the end of a barbell.

    Here is a vid of the ease of rolling I made years ago. Not only is it faster but again no chance of danaging expensive barbell.

    I use a 2.5 plate since it's small and less likely for the barbell to roll off of.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    I never had one roll off a belt because the surface area it is impossible unless you are deadlifting off a unlevel pkatform/floor which isn't advisable.

    I have had then roll off a 2.5 because a very small surface area and as I mentioned previously the weight can break or crack the biscuit which is waymore expensive to replace lb for lb compared to more common weight.
    edited April 1
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 488 Member Member Posts: 488 Member
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?
  • cupcakesandproteinshakescupcakesandproteinshakes Member Posts: 834 Member Member Posts: 834 Member
    Peeing yourself while pulling sumo.
    This.
    I have also done a small poo while deadlifting. Far TMI.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 463 Member Member Posts: 463 Member
    x8 @6, @7, @8 ,@8 w/ 3 minutes rest between sets, after doing nothing but fahves for eternity-1.

    ...then having to put everything away.
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 456 Member Member Posts: 456 Member
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    I'm nowhere near a deadlift expert, but I AM kind of expert in low back pain 😄. From what I've read and seen, you may be feeling it there if your core (esp transverse abs) is not engaged enough. This and making sure my shoulder blades are retracted and depressed have been my sticking points, as I have pretty weak TA's and small back muscles (like traps, serratus anterior). I still find it difficult to engage my TA's like I think I should, but I've gotten better. I'm not saying this your issue, but maybe one of the experts would be willing to critique your form if posted a video?
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 488 Member Member Posts: 488 Member
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    I'm nowhere near a deadlift expert, but I AM kind of expert in low back pain 😄. From what I've read and seen, you may be feeling it there if your core (esp transverse abs) is not engaged enough. This and making sure my shoulder blades are retracted and depressed have been my sticking points, as I have pretty weak TA's and small back muscles (like traps, serratus anterior). I still find it difficult to engage my TA's like I think I should, but I've gotten better. I'm not saying this your issue, but maybe one of the experts would be willing to critique your form if posted a video?

    Interesting. Thanks.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,802 Member Member Posts: 8,802 Member
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    Depends what you means by hurts.

    A heavier sore is fairly normal is some sense.

    If your load management and programming is well written for you as a individual then I wouldnt be concerned.

    If you are winging it and/or adding sets, reps, intensity, frequency, variations, etc... with no reason other you feel you should increase "x, y, z" you might be dosing too much stimulus that more than likely is causing recovery issues not to mention not being useful for your goals. Another possibility is using a cookie cutter program that isn't appropriate for you.
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 488 Member Member Posts: 488 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    Depends what you means by hurts.

    A heavier sore is fairly normal is some sense.

    If your load management and programming is well written for you as a individual then I wouldnt be concerned.

    If you are winging it and/or adding sets, reps, intensity, frequency, variations, etc... with no reason other you feel you should increase "x, y, z" you might be dosing too much stimulus that more than likely is causing recovery issues not to mention not being useful for your goals. Another possibility is using a cookie cutter program that isn't appropriate for you.

    I think I’m lifting too heavy too soon. I’m at 300 lb hip thrust and figured deadlift should be easy, but it’s not. I’m a *kitten* deadlifter
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,802 Member Member Posts: 8,802 Member
    serapel wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    Depends what you means by hurts.

    A heavier sore is fairly normal is some sense.

    If your load management and programming is well written for you as a individual then I wouldnt be concerned.

    If you are winging it and/or adding sets, reps, intensity, frequency, variations, etc... with no reason other you feel you should increase "x, y, z" you might be dosing too much stimulus that more than likely is causing recovery issues not to mention not being useful for your goals. Another possibility is using a cookie cutter program that isn't appropriate for you.

    I think I’m lifting too heavy too soon. I’m at 300 lb hip thrust and figured deadlift should be easy, but it’s not. I’m a *kitten* deadlifter

    The intensity from one lift doesn't transfer to another the further we go from specificity in relation.

    One thing to consider is hip thrusts have a very small ROM and incorporate less muscle motors compared to a deadlift. Factor in the skill or lack of performing deadlifts and it isn't surprising you find them difficult.

    Also using a form of auto regulation with E1rm should be useful in dosing your intensity regardless of rep scheme or lift selection.

    So the question I ask is how are yoy determining your dose of stimulus for your deadlift?
    edited April 5
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 488 Member Member Posts: 488 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    Depends what you means by hurts.

    A heavier sore is fairly normal is some sense.

    If your load management and programming is well written for you as a individual then I wouldnt be concerned.

    If you are winging it and/or adding sets, reps, intensity, frequency, variations, etc... with no reason other you feel you should increase "x, y, z" you might be dosing too much stimulus that more than likely is causing recovery issues not to mention not being useful for your goals. Another possibility is using a cookie cutter program that isn't appropriate for you.

    I think I’m lifting too heavy too soon. I’m at 300 lb hip thrust and figured deadlift should be easy, but it’s not. I’m a *kitten* deadlifter

    The intensity from one lift doesn't transfer to another the further we go from specificity in relation.

    One thing to consider is hip thrusts have a very small ROM and incorporate less muscle motors compared to a deadlift. Factor in the skill or lack of performing deadlifts and it isn't surprising you find them difficult.

    Also using a form of auto regulation with E1rm should be useful in dosing your intensity regardless of rep scheme or lift selection.

    So the question I ask is how are yoy determining your dose of stimulus for your deadlift?

    Not trying to be a smart Alec, but I have no idea what you just said lol

    I’m trying to deadlift around 110-120 lbs. I weigh 129. I’m doing stiff leg. My PT got me doing them. I’ve actually had to stop past 2 weeks to reduce stubborn lumbar pain.

    I’ve never liked deadlifts. The only variation I like are single leg RDLs. I’m 50 and have no desire to compete, etc. Maybe I should not go so hard and get the form first.

    My trainer is great, but I don’t want to have to be a busy mom with nagging back pain.

  • SnifterPugSnifterPug Member Posts: 590 Member Member Posts: 590 Member
    serapel wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    Depends what you means by hurts.

    A heavier sore is fairly normal is some sense.

    If your load management and programming is well written for you as a individual then I wouldnt be concerned.

    If you are winging it and/or adding sets, reps, intensity, frequency, variations, etc... with no reason other you feel you should increase "x, y, z" you might be dosing too much stimulus that more than likely is causing recovery issues not to mention not being useful for your goals. Another possibility is using a cookie cutter program that isn't appropriate for you.

    I think I’m lifting too heavy too soon. I’m at 300 lb hip thrust and figured deadlift should be easy, but it’s not. I’m a *kitten* deadlifter

    The intensity from one lift doesn't transfer to another the further we go from specificity in relation.

    One thing to consider is hip thrusts have a very small ROM and incorporate less muscle motors compared to a deadlift. Factor in the skill or lack of performing deadlifts and it isn't surprising you find them difficult.

    Also using a form of auto regulation with E1rm should be useful in dosing your intensity regardless of rep scheme or lift selection.

    So the question I ask is how are yoy determining your dose of stimulus for your deadlift?

    Not trying to be a smart Alec, but I have no idea what you just said lol

    I’m trying to deadlift around 110-120 lbs. I weigh 129. I’m doing stiff leg. My PT got me doing them. I’ve actually had to stop past 2 weeks to reduce stubborn lumbar pain.

    I’ve never liked deadlifts. The only variation I like are single leg RDLs. I’m 50 and have no desire to compete, etc. Maybe I should not go so hard and get the form first.

    My trainer is great, but I don’t want to have to be a busy mom with nagging back pain.

    I saw on your other thread you're using exercise as a way to get through lockdown. I hear ya. So am I.

    Have you started with this weight of deadlift or worked up to it? My PT started me just on the bar. My bodyweight is 77kg. I moved quickly up to 50kg mostly because that was the only weights I could initially get, but went back lower when more plates arrived. Did a PB of 70kg today (3 reps) but I have been working towards it since July. So my approach has been conservative but it has paid off. I have no back pain.

    I'm a rookie, so can't advise as such, but it seems to me if you have dived straight in to a deadlift near your body weight you may have done yourself no favours. My PT has also advised me to use a belt for heavier weights, simply to save strain on my back. I know belts are frowned on by some, but he made sure my form was correct and safe before taking the weight higher and I don't use a belt unless I'm over 80% of current max. This is for conventional and sumo lifts. For RDL type lifts I won't currently go higher than 45kg. I did 50kg when that was all the plates I had, but thoracic niggles prevented me from getting enough depth to work the hamstrings so I stopped.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,802 Member Member Posts: 8,802 Member
    serapel wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    Depends what you means by hurts.

    A heavier sore is fairly normal is some sense.

    If your load management and programming is well written for you as a individual then I wouldnt be concerned.

    If you are winging it and/or adding sets, reps, intensity, frequency, variations, etc... with no reason other you feel you should increase "x, y, z" you might be dosing too much stimulus that more than likely is causing recovery issues not to mention not being useful for your goals. Another possibility is using a cookie cutter program that isn't appropriate for you.

    I think I’m lifting too heavy too soon. I’m at 300 lb hip thrust and figured deadlift should be easy, but it’s not. I’m a *kitten* deadlifter

    The intensity from one lift doesn't transfer to another the further we go from specificity in relation.

    One thing to consider is hip thrusts have a very small ROM and incorporate less muscle motors compared to a deadlift. Factor in the skill or lack of performing deadlifts and it isn't surprising you find them difficult.

    Also using a form of auto regulation with E1rm should be useful in dosing your intensity regardless of rep scheme or lift selection.

    So the question I ask is how are yoy determining your dose of stimulus for your deadlift?

    Not trying to be a smart Alec, but I have no idea what you just said lol

    I’m trying to deadlift around 110-120 lbs. I weigh 129. I’m doing stiff leg. My PT got me doing them. I’ve actually had to stop past 2 weeks to reduce stubborn lumbar pain.

    I’ve never liked deadlifts. The only variation I like are single leg RDLs. I’m 50 and have no desire to compete, etc. Maybe I should not go so hard and get the form first.

    My trainer is great, but I don’t want to have to be a busy mom with nagging back pain.

    The "form" is not causing pain. That is a myth. It almost always a combination of the dosing of the intensity(weight) by volume(rep × sets). Put the right weight on the bar and use useful cues that work for you and good things happen. "Form" is expected to break down as we are either closer to our 1rm or fatigue is high.

    SLDL will hit your lower back more the standard deadlifts. So if your lower back is experiencing "pain" then you could be performing too much intensity and/or volume. In all respect your trainer should of dosed your stimulus better within your programming as a whole.

    If you have no aspirations of competing, yes you do not need to perform any deadlift though I think under the right programming you might have a better experience with them and can certainly be very useful if programmed correctly.
    edited April 7
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 488 Member Member Posts: 488 Member
    SnifterPug wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    serapel wrote: »
    My lower spine always hurts after. Why is that?

    Depends what you means by hurts.

    A heavier sore is fairly normal is some sense.

    If your load management and programming is well written for you as a individual then I wouldnt be concerned.

    If you are winging it and/or adding sets, reps, intensity, frequency, variations, etc... with no reason other you feel you should increase "x, y, z" you might be dosing too much stimulus that more than likely is causing recovery issues not to mention not being useful for your goals. Another possibility is using a cookie cutter program that isn't appropriate for you.

    I think I’m lifting too heavy too soon. I’m at 300 lb hip thrust and figured deadlift should be easy, but it’s not. I’m a *kitten* deadlifter

    The intensity from one lift doesn't transfer to another the further we go from specificity in relation.

    One thing to consider is hip thrusts have a very small ROM and incorporate less muscle motors compared to a deadlift. Factor in the skill or lack of performing deadlifts and it isn't surprising you find them difficult.

    Also using a form of auto regulation with E1rm should be useful in dosing your intensity regardless of rep scheme or lift selection.

    So the question I ask is how are yoy determining your dose of stimulus for your deadlift?

    Not trying to be a smart Alec, but I have no idea what you just said lol

    I’m trying to deadlift around 110-120 lbs. I weigh 129. I’m doing stiff leg. My PT got me doing them. I’ve actually had to stop past 2 weeks to reduce stubborn lumbar pain.

    I’ve never liked deadlifts. The only variation I like are single leg RDLs. I’m 50 and have no desire to compete, etc. Maybe I should not go so hard and get the form first.

    My trainer is great, but I don’t want to have to be a busy mom with nagging back pain.

    I saw on your other thread you're using exercise as a way to get through lockdown. I hear ya. So am I.

    Have you started with this weight of deadlift or worked up to it? My PT started me just on the bar. My bodyweight is 77kg. I moved quickly up to 50kg mostly because that was the only weights I could initially get, but went back lower when more plates arrived. Did a PB of 70kg today (3 reps) but I have been working towards it since July. So my approach has been conservative but it has paid off. I have no back pain.

    I'm a rookie, so can't advise as such, but it seems to me if you have dived straight in to a deadlift near your body weight you may have done yourself no favours. My PT has also advised me to use a belt for heavier weights, simply to save strain on my back. I know belts are frowned on by some, but he made sure my form was correct and safe before taking the weight higher and I don't use a belt unless I'm over 80% of current max. This is for conventional and sumo lifts. For RDL type lifts I won't currently go higher than 45kg. I did 50kg when that was all the plates I had, but thoracic niggles prevented me from getting enough depth to work the hamstrings so I stopped.

    You’ve inspired me! Thank you!! I will try again at a lower weight!
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