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75 Hard April 1

findingmewith3findingmewith3 Member Posts: 2 Member Member Posts: 2 Member
April 1st a friend and I are starting 75 hard. I'm anxiously excited for the program. I've done MFP successfully in the past which is when I decided to go with it this time. I'm also need cutting out a food completely is not something I will be able to stick with. Counting calories gives me the freedom to eat what I want but still hold me accountable for making healthy choices.

I am excited for the mental challenge of 75 Hard. I feel like I have been stuck in a rut for a long time, so I am using this as the first big step in my journey. I know it won't be easy, but I'm not letting myself back down from this challenge.

I have created an Instagram page to document my journey physically and mentally throughout the challenge.
edited March 20

Replies

  • nessyv18nessyv18 Member Posts: 6 Member Member Posts: 6 Member
    Looks like you're starting tomorrow, congrats! I'm planning to start on the 5th, would love to hear how you handle it starting out! :)
  • age_is_just_a_numberage_is_just_a_number Member, Premium Posts: 486 Member Member, Premium Posts: 486 Member
    Congratulations!
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,078 Member Member Posts: 2,078 Member
    Good luck. Read the ad for it which wasn't very specific.

    But change doesn't happen in one's comfort zone.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 25,871 Member Member Posts: 25,871 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Good luck. Read the ad for it which wasn't very specific.

    But change doesn't happen in one's comfort zone.

    I was curious so I signed up for the email (it's free to get initial details of the plan except for the "cost" of sharing your email). Basically you do two 45-minute exercise sessions per day (which I think you choose and one of them has to be outside) and you do a diet plan of your choice. The only "rule" is that you can't have any alcohol during the 75 days.

    I think it's more about living up to the commitment to do those things . . . actual results are still going to be up to the specifics of the diet and activity you choose.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,557 Member Member Posts: 7,557 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Good luck. Read the ad for it which wasn't very specific.

    But change doesn't happen in one's comfort zone.

    I was curious so I signed up for the email (it's free to get initial details of the plan except for the "cost" of sharing your email). Basically you do two 45-minute exercise sessions per day (which I think you choose and one of them has to be outside) and you do a diet plan of your choice. The only "rule" is that you can't have any alcohol during the 75 days.

    I think it's more about living up to the commitment to do those things . . . actual results are still going to be up to the specifics of the diet and activity you choose.

    It's a bit more than that, as there's drinking a gallon of water (why?) and 5 min cold showers and of course if you don't follow everything one day you have to restart (also read 10 pages of a book, which is one I kind of like although 10 pages seems a bit arbitrary again--I've had a personal goal to spend at least some time daily reading an actual book for a few months now, and am liking that).

    I like this piece on it, but it seems to be trendy at the moment: https://abbylangernutrition.com/75-hard-is-the-challenge-you-dont-want-to-accept/

    Personally, I think it makes more sense to create one's own challenges (not saying in one's comfort zone) based on one's actual goals and don't see how following Andy Frisella's is the one that will make all of us better people--his rhetoric is super irritating to me, as is the general ethos of this thing. But eh, there's always something new people want to try and it might be valuable for some of them, although I doubt related to the specific requirements of this challenge themselves.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 25,871 Member Member Posts: 25,871 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Good luck. Read the ad for it which wasn't very specific.

    But change doesn't happen in one's comfort zone.

    I was curious so I signed up for the email (it's free to get initial details of the plan except for the "cost" of sharing your email). Basically you do two 45-minute exercise sessions per day (which I think you choose and one of them has to be outside) and you do a diet plan of your choice. The only "rule" is that you can't have any alcohol during the 75 days.

    I think it's more about living up to the commitment to do those things . . . actual results are still going to be up to the specifics of the diet and activity you choose.

    It's a bit more than that, as there's drinking a gallon of water (why?) and 5 min cold showers and of course if you don't follow everything one day you have to restart (also read 10 pages of a book, which is one I kind of like although 10 pages seems a bit arbitrary again--I've had a personal goal to spend at least some time daily reading an actual book for a few months now, and am liking that).

    I like this piece on it, but it seems to be trendy at the moment: https://abbylangernutrition.com/75-hard-is-the-challenge-you-dont-want-to-accept/

    Personally, I think it makes more sense to create one's own challenges (not saying in one's comfort zone) based on one's actual goals and don't see how following Andy Frisella's is the one that will make all of us better people--his rhetoric is super irritating to me, as is the general ethos of this thing. But eh, there's always something new people want to try and it might be valuable for some of them, although I doubt related to the specific requirements of this challenge themselves.

    I didn't make it to the cold shower part! That's a hard "no" for me. :D

    I agree that I personally feel like I get better results when I set more individualized goals. They're more meaningful for me so not only do I get the specific improvement of accomplishing something that improves my life, but I think I get more of a mood boost than accomplishing a goal that someone else has chosen for me. That said, if you weren't sure what goals to set for yourself, I can see the benefit of a program like this, even if some of the goals seem kind of arbitrary.

    I do think there is an tinge of "this is the only way you can improve your life and if you don't do this you're making excuses for yourself" to the materials that I read.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 25,871 Member Member Posts: 25,871 Member
    @lemurcat2 I enjoyed that article -- thanks for sharing.
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