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Transitioning to heavier lifting. Please advise. Please.

MissAtomicBomb238MissAtomicBomb238 Member Posts: 27 Member Member Posts: 27 Member
So I run. But I’m cutting back the long endurance and want to focus on 5k/8k/10k (over half and full marathons).

So I lift for running. I Dona fair amount of upper body work. Lots of single leg stuff, mobility, balance. I’ve always been under the impression that I should avoid heavy heavy lifting as a running focused person. I’d like to get into more lifting- like in a squat rack with weights that reach my body weight or more. I’m very, very intimidated. But I also am very, very intrigued.

Where do I start? What should I watch? Do I need to by Converse sneakers and ankle high socks? Should I invest in Gymshark? Do I take preworkout now? (I’m kidding and being snarky but I really do need advice.) Help me.

PS- I don’t want to gain weight nor bodybuild really. However, the fitness forum is usually more focused on other stuff.
edited March 29

Replies

  • FitAgainBy55FitAgainBy55 Member Posts: 179 Member Member Posts: 179 Member
    When I raced (5ks - Marathon), I transitioned to heavy lifting by following the Strong Lifts 5x5 program. There are only 5 lifts to master and the suggestion is you start out with only the bar until you can maintain proper form. You can find loads of videos on the 5 lifts that aren't specific to the Strong Lifts program to help with form. The five lifts are:
    1. Squat
    2. Deadlift
    3. Bench press
    4. Overhead Press
    5. Barbell row

    The only trouble I had integrating this into my running training plan was avoiding a heavy leg day the day before a long run or speed runs. Other than that, it was pretty simple. I did all five lifts on one day instead of splitting them. The only downside to this program is you need access to a rack and weights which may be difficult unless you have access to a gym.
    edited March 29
  • DoubleG2DoubleG2 Member Posts: 52 Member Member Posts: 52 Member
    You're in the right place! There is a ton of great advice in this forum. I would consider choosing a progressive lifting program centered on a few foundational lifts. Info here: https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1
    I would also consider a few 1:1 sessions with a trainer to teach proper lifting technique to maximize results and minimize risk of injury. Best of luck!
    edited March 29
  • i_fraser11i_fraser11 Member Posts: 31 Member Member Posts: 31 Member
    I wrote this on the subject of lifting/body building - https://link.medium.com/NIxgpbWw2eb
  • SnifterPugSnifterPug Member Posts: 600 Member Member Posts: 600 Member
    I second the advice to invest in a few 1-1 sessions with a trainer who knows about lifting. Good form is important and although you can get a lot of information from YouTube and the internet generally (Girls Gone Strong is a fantastic site and well worth a look) nothing beats a trainer watching you in real time and paying attention to your mechanics.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,818 Member Member Posts: 8,818 Member
    So by cutting back your ceiling distance to 10k, your options are more open quite a bit.

    I wouldn't suggest any cookie cutter program without knowing your running schedule as well.

    If I'm understanding you, you still want to focus on running primarily but would enjoy the many benefits of resistance training.

    By far one of the two most useful things a person in your situation can do is utilize proper load management of the two activities which should include auto regulation on the resistance training side.

    Also the "good form" recommendation is almost always a hinder of actually what is going on which would be a lengthy explanationation. Of course if you are unfamiliar with a movement technique or small baseline starts is not a bad idea. What you really should focus on is appropriate intensity & volume which after practicing your reps over time your body will make adjustments on its own.

  • dbanks80dbanks80 Member Posts: 3,686 Member Member Posts: 3,686 Member
    I used to run all the time mainly 5ks and outside leisure. I started weight lifting 3 years ago and got addicted to it. I began progressive lifting and I work with a trainer who is all about great form. I still run but only on TM to get some cardio in.

    But like others have said progressive lifting and particular attention to form. Start light and progress heavier as you get stronger. If you can do a few sessions with a trainer that would be better than watching videos because a trainer can watch you to make sure your form is on point.
  • MissAtomicBomb238MissAtomicBomb238 Member Posts: 27 Member Member Posts: 27 Member
    Thanks everyone. I’m thinking of hiring a trainer to help me get over the intimidation factor.
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    So by cutting back your ceiling distance to 10k, your options are more open quite a bit.

    I wouldn't suggest any cookie cutter program without knowing your running schedule as well.

    If I'm understanding you, you still want to focus on running primarily but would enjoy the many benefits of resistance training.

    By far one of the two most useful things a person in your situation can do is utilize proper load management of the two activities which should include auto regulation on the resistance training side.

    Also the "good form" recommendation is almost always a hinder of actually what is going on which would be a lengthy explanationation. Of course if you are unfamiliar with a movement technique or small baseline starts is not a bad idea. What you really should focus on is appropriate intensity & volume which after practicing your reps over time your body will make adjustments on its own.

    Good point about thinking about my running programming first. I usually run 5 days a week but May have to cut to 4. I also have to play with my speed day and long run day (which will probably cap at 8 miles considering 10k may be my max until June/July when/if I decide to train for fall marathons more intensely.)
    i_fraser11 wrote: »
    I wrote this on the subject of lifting/body building - https://link.medium.com/NIxgpbWw2eb

    I’m still very active, but your article was interesting. Cool to be published.

    I watch some of the amazing lady folk at my gym and they just seem to know what they’re doing. A trainer sounds like the way to get there.
  • AKTipsyCatAKTipsyCat Member, Premium Posts: 180 Member Member, Premium Posts: 180 Member
    When I raced (5ks - Marathon), I transitioned to heavy lifting by following the Strong Lifts 5x5 program. There are only 5 lifts to master and the suggestion is you start out with only the bar until you can maintain proper form. You can find loads of videos on the 5 lifts that aren't specific to the Strong Lifts program to help with form. The five lifts are:
    1. Squat
    2. Deadlift
    3. Bench press
    4. Overhead Press
    5. Barbell row

    The only trouble I had integrating this into my running training plan was avoiding a heavy leg day the day before a long run or speed runs. Other than that, it was pretty simple. I did all five lifts on one day instead of splitting them. The only downside to this program is you need access to a rack and weights which may be difficult unless you have access to a gym.

    This is the program I used when I started lifting. I love it. It's a fast work out so you aren't in the gym for hours and it gets you results pretty quick. I found that I couldn't progress on some of the moves as quickly as was recommended, and backed down a bit - but they have a super convenient App to load on your phone if you're more comfortable tracking progress that way, and it also has videos so you can check your form if something feels awkward or "not quite right"
  • richardgavelrichardgavel Member Posts: 959 Member Member Posts: 959 Member
    When I raced (5ks - Marathon), I transitioned to heavy lifting by following the Strong Lifts 5x5 program. There are only 5 lifts to master and the suggestion is you start out with only the bar until you can maintain proper form. You can find loads of videos on the 5 lifts that aren't specific to the Strong Lifts program to help with form. The five lifts are:
    1. Squat
    2. Deadlift
    3. Bench press
    4. Overhead Press
    5. Barbell row

    The only trouble I had integrating this into my running training plan was avoiding a heavy leg day the day before a long run or speed runs. Other than that, it was pretty simple. I did all five lifts on one day instead of splitting them. The only downside to this program is you need access to a rack and weights which may be difficult unless you have access to a gym.

    I've also followed Stronglifts as an endurance athletes. I found the deadlift helped my running because it taught be to more effectively activate certain muscles, like the glutes, during my runs. In a 3x a week lifting schedule, you get 1,1, and 2 days or rest away from lifting. I tend to do my long runs on the first day of that 2 day rest, to recover better for the following lift session (especially since every lift day is a squat day on Stronglifts)
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,818 Member Member Posts: 8,818 Member
    Thanks everyone. I’m thinking of hiring a trainer to help me get over the intimidation factor.
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    So by cutting back your ceiling distance to 10k, your options are more open quite a bit.

    I wouldn't suggest any cookie cutter program without knowing your running schedule as well.

    If I'm understanding you, you still want to focus on running primarily but would enjoy the many benefits of resistance training.

    By far one of the two most useful things a person in your situation can do is utilize proper load management of the two activities which should include auto regulation on the resistance training side.

    Also the "good form" recommendation is almost always a hinder of actually what is going on which would be a lengthy explanationation. Of course if you are unfamiliar with a movement technique or small baseline starts is not a bad idea. What you really should focus on is appropriate intensity & volume which after practicing your reps over time your body will make adjustments on its own.

    Good point about thinking about my running programming first. I usually run 5 days a week but May have to cut to 4. I also have to play with my speed day and long run day (which will probably cap at 8 miles considering 10k may be my max until June/July when/if I decide to train for fall marathons more intensely.)
    i_fraser11 wrote: »
    I wrote this on the subject of lifting/body building - https://link.medium.com/NIxgpbWw2eb

    I’m still very active, but your article was interesting. Cool to be published.

    I watch some of the amazing lady folk at my gym and they just seem to know what they’re doing. A trainer sounds like the way to get there.
    Exactly two of the considerations to start thinking about, then you match up your exercise selection and fatigue stress. Some people I wouldnt have deadlift like you would see dosed in programs such as SS or SL or I would use a variation that lowers the stress index considerably.

    I would highly recommend finding a trainer/coach outside of a commercial gym. Unfortunately the trainers are the goto for more novel lifters and not only are they over priced but we're not trained with current evidence. Find somebody with experience and understanding how to manage ypur work load as well as the stress outside of your training ideally with a good track record.
  • heybalesheybales Member Posts: 18,734 Member Member Posts: 18,734 Member
    Thanks everyone. I’m thinking of hiring a trainer to help me get over the intimidation factor.

    Good point about thinking about my running programming first. I usually run 5 days a week but May have to cut to 4. I also have to play with my speed day and long run day (which will probably cap at 8 miles considering 10k may be my max until June/July when/if I decide to train for fall marathons more intensely.)

    I watch some of the amazing lady folk at my gym and they just seem to know what they’re doing. A trainer sounds like the way to get there.

    Curious about the running 5 days a week.

    Is that mostly because of pure enjoyment, or a goal in races to win age group, or hit PR's?
    Is marathon for same purposes, or to just do with respectable for you times?

    I've never had a goal to age place, even PR's wasn't realistic each time, mainly because the marathons was a month or shorter after a century bike ride I had trained more for. Running was recovery from lifting or hard rides and not frequent enough until after the century. A long tri was usually over a month to the century - that had more running focus, so it was just about maintaining.

    Those goals will then place where the strength training is in priorities.
    It can be a hard fit, all too easy to hit mediocre at everything.

    As several have mentioned, for sure some leg work to be done to help the running.
    And running in Active Recovery zones can help the lifting even and at least keep the miles on the feet.

    Good time of year to focus on the strength though as usually you just want to get miles on the feet, so gentle miles if you have the time is still useful.
  • SnifterPugSnifterPug Member Posts: 600 Member Member Posts: 600 Member
    Thanks everyone. I’m thinking of hiring a trainer to help me get over the intimidation factor.

    ...
    I watch some of the amazing lady folk at my gym and they just seem to know what they’re doing. A trainer sounds like the way to get there.

    I've noticed that most women who occupy the weights section generally seem to know what they're doing. I suspect it's because we've all been a bit intimidated by it and feel the need to go in there armed with some knowledge.

    However, it might be worth your while speaking to some of them while they are resting between sets, or in the changing room afterwards. Ask them if they can recommend a trainer. This has two possible benefits:

    a) they recommend a good trainer, and it's always best to get a recommendation if you can
    b) you may make some new friends in the weights section who may be happy to help you out if you are finding a particular move or piece of equipment difficult and there is no gym staff member easily to hand to ask.

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