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Are you an ego lifter?

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  • watts6151watts6151 Member, Premium Posts: 815 Member Member, Premium Posts: 815 Member
    I’m not an ego lifter, but
    I do have a few bets with a some gym members
    Regarding the ego lifters in my gym. Usually
    Based on Will they tear a pec or loose their grip and drop the bar during BB bench presses, also how many discs will someone rupture deadlifting too much weight using piss poor form. It’s free added entertainment 😂
  • robertw486robertw486 Member, Greeter Posts: 2,231 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 2,231 Member
    On the sled I've seen it way too much. And I'll admit that is when I was always tempted. But that video is just stupid.... and dangerous.
  • HooliekomHooliekom Member Posts: 94 Member Member Posts: 94 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Guys are notorious for lifting WAY MORE than they could really handle for actual REAL REPS. Just to get a little attention and admiration, but in reality most serious lifters know they are just ego lifting and brag about it to people unfamiliar with actually working out.

    How utterly pointless it is to 'lift' a weight that you can barely move - the only attention they would get from me is a slightly raised eyebrow. Which I can lift perfectly, keeping my form and lowering with control... ;)
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 653 Member Member Posts: 653 Member
    Hooliekom wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Guys are notorious for lifting WAY MORE than they could really handle for actual REAL REPS. Just to get a little attention and admiration, but in reality most serious lifters know they are just ego lifting and brag about it to people unfamiliar with actually working out.

    How utterly pointless it is to 'lift' a weight that you can barely move - the only attention they would get from me is a slightly raised eyebrow. Which I can lift perfectly, keeping my form and lowering with control... ;)

    Unless you are trying to test your one rep max....
  • nossmfnossmf Member Posts: 1,279 Member Member Posts: 1,279 Member
    Unless you are trying to test your one rep max....

    Provided it actually is a ONE rep max, not trying to keep moving it repeatedly...

    Had to rope in my ego a bit today at the gym. I have two different chest routines, and the one for today called for heavy sets of bench press, five sets starting at five reps, then four, and so on. Got to my two reps weight, eeked it out, but knew I didn't have it in me to do a one rep set. (Note: not my 1RM, probably 95% of it.) So I roped in my pride and backed the weight down to my five rep set and did another set there to finish my bench routine.
  • supercpa999supercpa999 Member, Premium Posts: 339 Member Member, Premium Posts: 339 Member
    Lol not me to the contrary I feel somewhat self-conscious using just 25 lb plates on the bench press
  • Jeffit_170Jeffit_170 Member Posts: 56 Member Member Posts: 56 Member
    I know I ego lifted when I was a college kid. There was no internet. Now it is form and clean reps over 1RM (or too heavy). But this topic brings up something I have been pondering... When you see someone in the gym doing something dumb or they have poor form, do you say anything to them? I never do but I WANT TO. I usually just compliment people doing clean, precise reps.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,170 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,170 Member
    Jeffit_170 wrote: »
    I know I ego lifted when I was a college kid. There was no internet. Now it is form and clean reps over 1RM (or too heavy). But this topic brings up something I have been pondering... When you see someone in the gym doing something dumb or they have poor form, do you say anything to them? I never do but I WANT TO. I usually just compliment people doing clean, precise reps.
    Well being a PT in my gym, I'll always mention it if I see it. Luckily for me, members know that I'm more than qualified for my opinion. But even when I'm working out and NOT wearing my gym uniform, I'll mention it to someone if I see it. It's rare that I've had a bad reaction.
    Just a few weeks ago, a group of teenage ball players who come in and work out regular were leg pressing and loading up the sled with up to 8 plates on each side. When I saw they were doing just knee bends, I asked the person who was currently in there to break parallel. He went down, but couldn't push it back up. I then let them know, that IF they wanted to actual put on some muscle and put their egos aside, they should only have weight on there that they can do a full rep with. Since then, they don't use more than 8 plates total and do full reps. And they actually thanked me and said their strength coach sucks.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • Jeffit_170Jeffit_170 Member Posts: 56 Member Member Posts: 56 Member
    @ninerbuff Yea, you have the position and credentials, so it would really be inconsiderate for you to NOT say anything. I will probably start to speak up more (humbly and politely). If they get upset, that is on them. Maybe they will at least think about what they were doing/research going forward.
  • nossmfnossmf Member Posts: 1,279 Member Member Posts: 1,279 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    But even when I'm working out and NOT wearing my gym uniform, I'll mention it to someone if I see it. It's rare that I've had a bad reaction.

    I'm not a trainer or certified, but I have spoken up a few times. Or rather, I used to speak up, because I had a couple occasions of a highly negative reactions. I like to think I'm polite, and my approach would usually be of the "excuse me, may I ask a question, I'm trying to learn, why are you doing this exercise in this way?" Usually this got me a polite explanation, and I could then express my opinion and usually be received well. But one guy immediately belittled me for having less muscle and therefore couldn't possibly know what I was doing, while another time I was going to ask a girl my question but couldn't get beyond "excuse me" before a dude (presumably a jealous boyfriend) was literally in my face, spittle flying, telling me to back the **** off.

    I've since left everybody strictly alone, with the exception of one time I got the attention of a PT I knew and pointed out somebody, and once I stepped up when I saw a couple skinny, young teenaged boys doing something patently dangerous not only to themselves but to people around them.
  • Jeffit_170Jeffit_170 Member Posts: 56 Member Member Posts: 56 Member
    nossmf wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    But even when I'm working out and NOT wearing my gym uniform, I'll mention it to someone if I see it. It's rare that I've had a bad reaction.

    I'm not a trainer or certified, but I have spoken up a few times. Or rather, I used to speak up, because I had a couple occasions of a highly negative reactions. I like to think I'm polite, and my approach would usually be of the "excuse me, may I ask a question, I'm trying to learn, why are you doing this exercise in this way?" Usually this got me a polite explanation, and I could then express my opinion and usually be received well. But one guy immediately belittled me for having less muscle and therefore couldn't possibly know what I was doing, while another time I was going to ask a girl my question but couldn't get beyond "excuse me" before a dude (presumably a jealous boyfriend) was literally in my face, spittle flying, telling me to back the **** off.

    I've since left everybody strictly alone, with the exception of one time I got the attention of a PT I knew and pointed out somebody, and once I stepped up when I saw a couple skinny, young teenaged boys doing something patently dangerous not only to themselves but to people around them.

    Oh man @nossmf! That is brutal and my fear.. LOL. Yea, I have seen one experienced powerlifter in my gym. He is bigger and stronger than I could ever be. But I saw a real issue with his squat. He seems like a really nice guy, but, since he is experienced and strong, I just left it alone.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,858 Member Member Posts: 8,858 Member
    Hooliekom wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Guys are notorious for lifting WAY MORE than they could really handle for actual REAL REPS. Just to get a little attention and admiration, but in reality most serious lifters know they are just ego lifting and brag about it to people unfamiliar with actually working out.


    How utterly pointless it is to 'lift' a weight that you can barely move - the only attention they would get from me is a slightly raised eyebrow. Which I can lift perfectly, keeping my form and lowering with control... ;)

    While I agree lifting 1rm outside of a competition isnt useful. Some of my training involves lifts that are 92% for singles or 81% for 5s are barely moving and can be very useful towards my goals. Just because the barbell is slow or fast doesnt equate proper intensity.

    "Form" is non existent. There isn't a definition that is universal.

    Even the most elite lifters cannot replicate their reps or "form". Its a word that is town around that literally has no definition that applies to everyone.





    edited June 10
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,858 Member Member Posts: 8,858 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Jeffit_170 wrote: »
    I know I ego lifted when I was a college kid. There was no internet. Now it is form and clean reps over 1RM (or too heavy). But this topic brings up something I have been pondering... When you see someone in the gym doing something dumb or they have poor form, do you say anything to them? I never do but I WANT TO. I usually just compliment people doing clean, precise reps.
    Well being a PT in my gym, I'll always mention it if I see it. Luckily for me, members know that I'm more than qualified for my opinion. But even when I'm working out and NOT wearing my gym uniform, I'll mention it to someone if I see it. It's rare that I've had a bad reaction.
    Just a few weeks ago, a group of teenage ball players who come in and work out regular were leg pressing and loading up the sled with up to 8 plates on each side. When I saw they were doing just knee bends, I asked the person who was currently in there to break parallel. He went down, but couldn't push it back up. I then let them know, that IF they wanted to actual put on some muscle and put their egos aside, they should only have weight on there that they can do a full rep with. Since then, they don't use more than 8 plates total and do full reps. And they actually thanked me and said their strength coach sucks.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    What kind though? Plenty of evidence showing benefits of non parallel squats or leg presses for certain sports. I believe the study was based on 120 degree of knee flexion if I remember correctly.



    edited June 10
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 20,301 Member Member, Premium Posts: 20,301 Member
    nossmf wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    But even when I'm working out and NOT wearing my gym uniform, I'll mention it to someone if I see it. It's rare that I've had a bad reaction.

    I'm not a trainer or certified, but I have spoken up a few times. Or rather, I used to speak up, because I had a couple occasions of a highly negative reactions. I like to think I'm polite, and my approach would usually be of the "excuse me, may I ask a question, I'm trying to learn, why are you doing this exercise in this way?" Usually this got me a polite explanation, and I could then express my opinion and usually be received well. But one guy immediately belittled me for having less muscle and therefore couldn't possibly know what I was doing, while another time I was going to ask a girl my question but couldn't get beyond "excuse me" before a dude (presumably a jealous boyfriend) was literally in my face, spittle flying, telling me to back the **** off.

    I've since left everybody strictly alone, with the exception of one time I got the attention of a PT I knew and pointed out somebody, and once I stepped up when I saw a couple skinny, young teenaged boys doing something patently dangerous not only to themselves but to people around them.

    Oh, man, yes: Whether this is going to work out well is very dependent on who's doing the suggesting! Someone who looks like @ninerbuff, male, correcting lifting form? Other than the boyfriend kind of scenario you mention, or some other cases for women who've had bad past gym experiences with guys, probably could go OK.

    It's not lifting, but despite long experience, some age-group competition results, and having earned coaching certs, I never offer people suggestions about rowing machine technique at the gym, because pretty much no one wants advice from a li'l ol' lady (and many don't want advice from a woman at all, IME). If I have a polite opportunity to get into a non-interruptive social chat with them, maybe, or if I know them. Otherwise, no, Not At All. It won't go well. If they're doing something that looks truly dangerous to me, I'll talk with the gym staff about it (which I have), and that's it.
  • MotorsheenMotorsheen Member Posts: 19,914 Member Member Posts: 19,914 Member
    nossmf wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    But even when I'm working out and NOT wearing my gym uniform, I'll mention it to someone if I see it. It's rare that I've had a bad reaction.

    I'm not a trainer or certified, but I have spoken up a few times. Or rather, I used to speak up, because I had a couple occasions of a highly negative reactions. I like to think I'm polite, and my approach would usually be of the "excuse me, may I ask a question, I'm trying to learn, why are you doing this exercise in this way?" Usually this got me a polite explanation, and I could then express my opinion and usually be received well. But one guy immediately belittled me for having less muscle and therefore couldn't possibly know what I was doing, while another time I was going to ask a girl my question but couldn't get beyond "excuse me" before a dude (presumably a jealous boyfriend) was literally in my face, spittle flying, telling me to back the **** off.

    I've since left everybody strictly alone, with the exception of one time I got the attention of a PT I knew and pointed out somebody, and once I stepped up when I saw a couple skinny, young teenaged boys doing something patently dangerous not only to themselves but to people around them.

    If someone is exhibiting poor form and is a danger to others, then yeah, I would speak up.
    (the key word here is: others)

    Any other situation, I keep quiet.
    edited June 10
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 653 Member Member Posts: 653 Member
    I personally would never approach someone with bad form unless they asked for my opinion (which, why would they?). One--I'm an introvert and two--I don't think most people would be receptive to it.
  • SpadesheartSpadesheart Member Posts: 457 Member Member Posts: 457 Member
    Okay, in general I agree and that video is ridiculous, but I'll add a counterpoint.

    For some exercises, I am not a form junkie, especially if it's relatively safe, it's being done to an exhaustion at some point in one of the sets, and it's a compound lift where other muscles can be utilized. If you're pulling cables and you're doing as much weight as you possibly can, is it really bad? Your probably using a greater deal of your musculature to do the work, and you're still exhausting the muscles. If you need to pull back your back on a lat pulldown because you're doing more weight than you "should" be doing, I don't really know if I count that as ego lifting per say.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,170 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,170 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Jeffit_170 wrote: »
    I know I ego lifted when I was a college kid. There was no internet. Now it is form and clean reps over 1RM (or too heavy). But this topic brings up something I have been pondering... When you see someone in the gym doing something dumb or they have poor form, do you say anything to them? I never do but I WANT TO. I usually just compliment people doing clean, precise reps.
    Well being a PT in my gym, I'll always mention it if I see it. Luckily for me, members know that I'm more than qualified for my opinion. But even when I'm working out and NOT wearing my gym uniform, I'll mention it to someone if I see it. It's rare that I've had a bad reaction.
    Just a few weeks ago, a group of teenage ball players who come in and work out regular were leg pressing and loading up the sled with up to 8 plates on each side. When I saw they were doing just knee bends, I asked the person who was currently in there to break parallel. He went down, but couldn't push it back up. I then let them know, that IF they wanted to actual put on some muscle and put their egos aside, they should only have weight on there that they can do a full rep with. Since then, they don't use more than 8 plates total and do full reps. And they actually thanked me and said their strength coach sucks.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    What kind though? Plenty of evidence showing benefits of non parallel squats or leg presses for certain sports. I believe the study was based on 120 degree of knee flexion if I remember correctly.


    Football kids. Many of whom I knew when they were in middle school playing ball in leagues. When I see them now, they actually ask me a lot of questions on exercises they can do to help them get ahead of their other teamates. What's great is that they are actually serious and are adhering to advice given to them.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 45,170 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 45,170 Member
    Okay, in general I agree and that video is ridiculous, but I'll add a counterpoint.

    For some exercises, I am not a form junkie, especially if it's relatively safe, it's being done to an exhaustion at some point in one of the sets, and it's a compound lift where other muscles can be utilized. If you're pulling cables and you're doing as much weight as you possibly can, is it really bad? Your probably using a greater deal of your musculature to do the work, and you're still exhausting the muscles. If you need to pull back your back on a lat pulldown because you're doing more weight than you "should" be doing, I don't really know if I count that as ego lifting per say.
    The key phrase here is "as much as you POSSIBLY" can. I can do a knee bend with TONS of weight, but why? What's the purpose? To show my knee bend is super strong? Or I can swing the hell out of barbell on a curl with twice as much a I do strictly, but again what is the purpose unless I'm in a sport or job that uses that kind of leverage (say a haybaler).
    It's mostly with men and not with women, but the instinct to be better than the next guy has many in the gym trying to prove they are on par or better than their peers in the gym. Not intentionally mind you. But for ego lifters it's their time they feel they shine and think they are getting respect.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

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