Not losing weight

I am in the same place as many posts I have seen. Not losing any wieght.

I know it looks like I have lost weight, but that is because I guesstimated where I was when I started. I am exercising 3 days a week (basically walking/running trying to get C25K W1D1 completed) 30 mins per day. I am logging EVERY tiny thing I eat... weighing it, measuring it.. almost to the point of obsession.

I have lost 2" on my waist and 2" on my hips, and basically ZERO on the scale.

I have been doing this for about 6 weeks now. I would think I would see weight loss as well as inch loss. Many tell me "you are gaining muscle" but I don't see where the muscle has been gained, accept possibly on my calves.

Diary open... I am open to ideas.
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Replies

  • soysauce6626
    soysauce6626 Posts: 118 Member
    You should incorporate some kind of resistant training to your workouts. That should do the trick.
  • If you are losing inches in your waist and hips it's obvious you are making progress. Don't be so concerned with that number on the scale. There are too many other factors that go into that number. Keep up the good work and you'll keep seeing results. It may be time to adjust the macronutrient requirements when the number AND the measurements start stalling.
  • fleetzz
    fleetzz Posts: 962 Member
    Agree that losing inches is more important than the number on the scale. And looking at your profile it looks like you lost some already.

    Edited:
    You were not eating 1200 calories for many days, plus some exercise. You may not be eating enough. The last few weeks I finally saw you hit higher numbers for calorie intake, you may be holding on to the weight due to undereating. Weird but it happens. There are lots of good threads about eating enough to lose. I would recommend calculating your TDEE and subtracting 10-20% for slow weight loss. Since you are losing inches, something is working.
  • defmut3
    defmut3 Posts: 735 Member
    Losing Inches therefore losing body fat. Whats the issue? Why do scales matter if your appearance is improving?
  • First off, I can feel your frustration. It's alright.

    Now. First things first-- throw out your scale. It is not doing anything right now but hurting you. You are losing inches and that's great! You probably are gaining muscle but because you haven't lost enough body fat percentages to really *see* the changes (yet!), it might seem like you're not making much progress.

    Cardio is not the ultimate in fat burning, however. Odds are, you will not see results quickly or abundantly doing a strictly cardio-based regime. I would encourage you as I encourage everyone to start picking up heavy things. No barbie weights (although if that's where you start, that's where you start)-- do research and start a weight training regimen.

    Cardio has its place-- as a filler in between lifting days.

    You will see gains in strength and loss in body fat. It is the nature of things.

    I took a look at your diary and I am shocked to see that you are not looking at your protein intake. Protein is king.

    Also, your caloric intake is so very low... I am concerned you are not eating enough, in fact. Have you calculated your resting basal matabolism?
  • **I took a look at your diary and I am shocked to see that you are not looking at your protein intake. Protein is king.

    I am always over on my protein! I eat a lot of chicken, lean hamburger... and have recently turned to ground chicken and turkey, slowly replacing hamburger (although not completely).

    **Also, your caloric intake is so very low... I am concerned you are not eating enough, in fact. Have you calculated your resting basal matabolism?

    I was at 1200 per day, and a friend told me I might not be getting enough. So, I raised it to 1320. (Actually, MFP sets it after I tell it my goal) I do eat what I earn from exercising.

    How do I calculate resting basal metabolism?
  • fleetzz
    fleetzz Posts: 962 Member
    Do a google search on resting metabolic rate calculator and TDEE, they are available online, and you can enter your age, height, weight, exercise frequency and intensity. They will pop out numbers that will be a fair but not precise approximation of your calorie needs if you are comatose (resting metabolic rate) and how many calories you need daily with the amount of activity that you participate in (TDEE).
  • You should incorporate some kind of resistant training to your workouts. That should do the trick.

    I have recently added some weight work to my routine. Small amounts right now...

    5 mins with 10 lb bells (focus on upper arms)
    5 mins arm pulls (using the bar, not the rope) with 37.6 lbs

    Sorry if I am not using the correct terms, not a weight lifting pro *grin*
  • pavrg
    pavrg Posts: 277 Member
    I don't know what your height/weight is, so it's difficult to say if 1200 or 1320 is the right number. Assuming that you are logging everything accurately, 1200 was probably the right number.

    1200 calories/day is not this magic number that will put you into starvation mode. Everyone has different needs depending on their body size and if your sedentary maintenance calories - 500 is under 1200 (and it will eventually get there for most women seeking to lose weight), it is perfectly fine to eat that.

    Resistance training will help you look better and be more fit, but will be marginal in helping you lose weight. Also, don't even bother starting unless you do a lot of research on it and know someone to show you how to properly lift with free weights. Doing some dumbbell curls is a waste of time in lieu of your weight loss goal.
  • nomeejerome
    nomeejerome Posts: 2,616 Member
    I am in the same place as many posts I have seen. Not losing any wieght.

    I know it looks like I have lost weight, but that is because I guesstimated where I was when I started. I am exercising 3 days a week (basically walking/running trying to get C25K W1D1 completed) 30 mins per day. I am logging EVERY tiny thing I eat... weighing it, measuring it.. almost to the point of obsession.

    I have lost 2" on my waist and 2" on my hips, and basically ZERO on the scale.

    I have been doing this for about 6 weeks now. I would think I would see weight loss as well as inch loss. Many tell me "you are gaining muscle" but I don't see where the muscle has been gained, accept possibly on my calves.

    Diary open... I am open to ideas.

    Calorie deficit for weight loss and exercise for fitness. If you are not losing weight, there is a miscalculation somewhere along the line. However, you stated you are losing inches, so maybe focus on that instead of scale weight? Also, if you are eating at a deficit, you are not gaining any muscle.
  • NaturalinCO
    NaturalinCO Posts: 164 Member
    I tried using my TDEE and BMR to figure out my happy place re: calories. I'm not sure that's a one size fits all kinda deal. My suggestion would be, if you have MFP set at 2lbs/wk loss - move it to 1lb/wk loss so you change it up and your body has to keep up with the change. My initial thought is definitely more calories - I'd say a good 1500 cals/day then see where you're at. A friend here had hers at 1200 for awhile, lost for a few weeks then puttered out. She bumped up the cals to 1600 and has lost almost 4lbs since. Good luck to you! I know the feeling!
  • Do a google search on resting metabolic rate calculator and TDEE, they are available online, and you can enter your age, height, weight, exercise frequency and intensity. They will pop out numbers that will be a fair but not precise approximation of your calorie needs if you are comatose (resting metabolic rate) and how many calories you need daily with the amount of activity that you participate in (TDEE).

    http://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

    Found this one... it says:
    1608 BMR
    3738 TEE

    Does that mean I should be eating 1608 calories a day? And would I lose at that intake? I would think that would be to maintain, but I don't know.
  • pavrg
    pavrg Posts: 277 Member
    Also, if you are eating at a deficit, you are not gaining any muscle.
    I agree that OP is not gaining muscle because of her exercise routine, but it is possible to gain muscle while on a calorie deficit (albeit slower than on a surplus). It's an equilibrium equation, not an either/or.
  • nomeejerome
    nomeejerome Posts: 2,616 Member
    Do a google search on resting metabolic rate calculator and TDEE, they are available online, and you can enter your age, height, weight, exercise frequency and intensity. They will pop out numbers that will be a fair but not precise approximation of your calorie needs if you are comatose (resting metabolic rate) and how many calories you need daily with the amount of activity that you participate in (TDEE).

    http://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

    Found this one... it says:
    1608 BMR
    3738 TEE

    Does that mean I should be eating 1608 calories a day? And would I lose at that intake? I would think that would be to maintain, but I don't know.

    If you eat below TDEE, you will lose weight. If your BMR is 1608, that should be the minimum you should eat each day.
  • pavrg
    pavrg Posts: 277 Member
    Do a google search on resting metabolic rate calculator and TDEE, they are available online, and you can enter your age, height, weight, exercise frequency and intensity. They will pop out numbers that will be a fair but not precise approximation of your calorie needs if you are comatose (resting metabolic rate) and how many calories you need daily with the amount of activity that you participate in (TDEE).

    http://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

    Found this one... it says:
    1608 BMR
    3738 TEE

    Does that mean I should be eating 1608 calories a day? And would I lose at that intake? I would think that would be to maintain, but I don't know.
    If you don't mind me asking, what is your height/weight? 3700 cal TDEE for a 52 year old woman is astronomically high. You should be somewhere in the 1500-1900 range depending on your height/weight.

    http://iifym.com/tdee-calculator/

    Use that and set it to "couch potato" even if you aren't. Use the top bullet point method. Subtract 500 from the answer and that is your net calorie goal.
  • It's a good bet to eat .8-1.2 grams of protein for each pound of goal body weight. MFP does not share my sentiment on this and I've noticed that I've had to utterly disregard its suggestions.

    I'd say start with .8 grams of protein/lb, especially if you're doing weight training. Shoot for a diet of 60% carbs (whole grains, vegetables, especially), 20% protein, and 20% fat (good fats-- nuts, avocado, etc. especially).

    It is paradoxical but eat more. EAT. EAT.
  • pavrg
    pavrg Posts: 277 Member
    It's a good bet to eat .8-1.2 grams of protein for each pound of goal body weight. MFP does not share my sentiment on this and I've noticed that I've had to utterly disregard its suggestions.

    I'd say start with .8 grams of protein/lb, especially if you're doing weight training. Shoot for a diet of 60% carbs (whole grains, vegetables, especially), 20% protein, and 20% fat (good fats-- nuts, avocado, etc. especially).

    It is paradoxical but eat more. EAT. EAT.
    This is the 2nd bit of bad advice that you've given on this thread.

    0.8-1.2 g of protein for someone who is not on a rigorous strength training program is worthless. MFP does not assume the person is a body builder or athlete; it assumes the person wants to eat the standard accepted daily portions of nutrients while losing weights.

    A 52 year old does not have the same nutrition and fitness needs as a 24 year old.
  • Additionally, it should be mentioned that you cannot target fat loss. You can target muscle gain, but fat loss has to do more with heredity than it does the million sit ups one might do (for example).

    Try to incorporate a more rounded resistance/weight lifting routine.

    I'd suggest trying out Fitocracy. They'll set you straight and can make some awesome suggestions for your specific circumstances.
  • Do a google search on resting metabolic rate calculator and TDEE, they are available online, and you can enter your age, height, weight, exercise frequency and intensity. They will pop out numbers that will be a fair but not precise approximation of your calorie needs if you are comatose (resting metabolic rate) and how many calories you need daily with the amount of activity that you participate in (TDEE).

    http://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

    Found this one... it says:
    1608 BMR
    3738 TEE

    Does that mean I should be eating 1608 calories a day? And would I lose at that intake? I would think that would be to maintain, but I don't know.
    If you don't mind me asking, what is your height/weight? 3700 cal TDEE for a 52 year old woman is astronomically high. You should be somewhere in the 1500-1900 range depending on your height/weight.

    http://iifym.com/tdee-calculator/

    Use that and set it to "couch potato" even if you aren't. Use the top bullet point method. Subtract 500 from the answer and that is your net calorie goal.

    my weight is 197... height is 5' 6"
  • Calliope610
    Calliope610 Posts: 3,797 Member
    Basal metabolic rate (BMR), and the closely related resting metabolic rate (RMR), is the amount of energy expended daily by humans and other animals at rest. The release, and using, of energy in this state is sufficient only for the functioning of the vital organs, the heart, lungs, nervous system, kidneys, liver, intestine, sex organs, muscles, and skin.

    BMR is how much fuel (calories) your body uses, say if you were in a coma. TDEE is your Total Daily Energy Expenditure, how much fuel you use during the day in all your activities, from brushing your teeth in the am, working out in the gym to cooking dinner in the evening or typing on the keyboard answering a forum question.

    TDEE is what to eat to MAINTAIN your current weight. In order to LOSE weight, eat TDEE less as moderate deficit (10-25% depending on how much weight you want to lose).