Coffee lovers who calorie count

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Is there a coffee that you enjoy drinking black? I have tried a couple but nothing seems to stick for me. I usually put Coffee Mate hazelnut creamer but the calories add up.
I just tried Starbucks Espresso and Cream Light (in a can) 6.5fl oz it is 70 calories. It tasted great and kept me energized. Another plus is being able to just scan it with this app and not measure how much creamer I am using. Please share your coffee secrets! :D:p

Replies

  • SafariGalNYC
    SafariGalNYC Posts: 888 Member
    edited February 13
    I like espresso black. My fav beans are Kona … has a light sweetness to it. Also drink black.

    Though, I drink all coffee black. :)
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,161 Member
    I am a coffee drinker. I don't have a problem.

    I have several beans that I buy that I like. I drink it black. Sometimes at night (when the cold winds blow), I'll have a decaf with unsweetened cocoa powder and maybe a little turbinado. I call that candy coffee. Someone else here calls it "Choffee."

    I make pour-over coffee with 25 grams of beans to make a mug about 15 ounces.

    Fresh beans is the key. Not too fresh - they need a day or three after being roasted to mature, but after that they need to be fresh. Keep them in an airtight container. Don't put them in the refrigerator or freezer. Grind before you make them. I love coffee. I'm going to go make a decaf RIGHT NOW.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,024 Member
    I prefer my coffee with a good lot of hot skim milk, frothed with a hand frother if I'm feeling fancy.

    I do use good beans from a local roaster, but the origin, roast, etc. vary because I enjoy variety. I'm working my way through their extensive list of coffees (the non-flavored ones) and deciding which ones I like best. I just finished a bag of fair trade/organic Ethiopian, which I liked very much.

    I grind the beans at home (but in a blade rather than burr grinder), and use a porcelain pour-over holder with a paper filter plus hot water from a stovetop tea kettle to make it. I usually use 165g of skim milk, microwaved to heat (sometimes there's a skin on top to remove after heating). How much coffee per cup depends on the size of the cup. My favorite cup is big, so the milk is a small fraction. Two heaping tablespoons of coffee is good, in that case. With a smaller cup, I use somewhat more coffee, because the milk can overwhelm the coffee's flavor when it's a larger fraction of the cup.

    When I froth it, I use a Ninja hand frother I got on Amazon, very easy to use. The frothed milk has a luxurious mouth-feel, and the milk is bonus protein for me (5.7g protein, 56 calories).

    For ease, I log it with an MFP "meal" I set up with brewed coffee and 165g of milk in the "meal". I just put the cup on my food scale, zero/tare the scale, pour in milk until it's 165g (or close enough), then stick it in the microwave to heat.

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  • perryc05
    perryc05 Posts: 209 Member
    The apex of coffee is Lion Brand:
    https://www.lioncoffee.com/
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,389 Member
    I have Arab coffee powder with cardamom that I simply cook on the stove top. Drink it without any further additions. I'm more of a teadrinker generally, but still, this is tasty.
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,161 Member
    perryc05 wrote: »
    The apex of coffee is Lion Brand:
    https://www.lioncoffee.com/

    Lion is decent. Where I live, there are lots of small independent coffee roasters that produce amazing coffee.

    Beans grown on Kona are for sure quite good. Some of our local roasters sell Kona coffee. There's lots of other options. If you're somewhere you can try some other kinds of coffee, I'd recommend you do.
  • foldinthecheese
    foldinthecheese Posts: 27 Member
    As long as the beans are "good enough" a good roaster can produce beans that make great coffee. Yes, for amazing coffee you need amazing beans and an amazing roast, but that's very hard to find.

    My advice is to find a good roaster and talk to them. In my experience, they love to teach new-comers about good coffee.

    I make espresso almost exclusively and my favorite beans usually have a bit of a chocolatey flavor (it's just the flavor of the beans, no chocolate added).

    Sometimes I buy beans from Costco because there's a local roaster whose beans costco sells and they often have beans roasted within the last week.

    Some nicer grocery stores also sell beans in bulk that have been roasted quite recently (they're delivered directly by the company).

    Rule of thumb - if you can't determine when the beans were roasted - avoid those.
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,161 Member
    As long as the beans are "good enough" a good roaster can produce beans that make great coffee. Yes, for amazing coffee you need amazing beans and an amazing roast, but that's very hard to find.

    My advice is to find a good roaster and talk to them. In my experience, they love to teach new-comers about good coffee.

    I make espresso almost exclusively and my favorite beans usually have a bit of a chocolatey flavor (it's just the flavor of the beans, no chocolate added).

    Sometimes I buy beans from Costco because there's a local roaster whose beans costco sells and they often have beans roasted within the last week.

    Some nicer grocery stores also sell beans in bulk that have been roasted quite recently (they're delivered directly by the company).

    Rule of thumb - if you can't determine when the beans were roasted - avoid those.

    Agreed!

    A friend who I dive with has a micro roasting business on the side. He sells at the weekly farmer's market. For beans that he roasted more than a week ago, he just makes coffee and gives it away and tells people he wouldn't sell those beans. He makes very good coffee, and he gave me some that made me realize I like medium roast as good as dark roast if it's roasted right and is fresh.
  • kdunn7179
    kdunn7179 Posts: 4 Member
    Good beans make the difference! Find out what you like. Bonus if you have your own coffee grinder or can roast your own beans.