looking for nutritarian friends

Hi. I want to lose weight and be healthy. I guess healthy is the top priority. If anyone is interested in the nutritarian lifestyle or is already living that way and wants support add me. I want to hear what recipes you enjoy or what short cuts you use to prepare foods. Stuff like that. I am not interested in eating junk food in smaller portions as part of my regular diet, but occasionally I have no problem with it.

I've had chocolate pudding made out of white beans, and thought it tasted great, so welcome recipes like that.
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Replies

  • Graelwyn75
    Graelwyn75 Posts: 4,404 Member
    What exactly is a nutritarian?
  • trogalicious
    trogalicious Posts: 4,578 Member
    What exactly is a nutritarian?
    I second this.
  • jenilla1
    jenilla1 Posts: 11,142 Member
    Quick, somebody Google it!
  • trogalicious
    trogalicious Posts: 4,578 Member
    Quick, somebody Google it!

    Per wiki:
    A nutritarian is a person who has a preference for foods that are high in micronutrients.

    The term “nutritarian” was coined by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. In his book, Eat to Live, he offers this health equation while describing the nutritarian approach to health:

    Health = Nutrients/Calories (or H= N/C for short).

    In other words: the more nutrients you consume per calorie, the healthier you will be.

    Nutrients in the numerator (top part of the equation) include vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals. Since these are found in small quantities in food, they are considered to be micronutrients. Caloric sources in the denominator include the macronutrients: fat, carbohydrate, and protein. We need to meet our micronutrient needs without consuming excessive calories.

    A high N/C diet is also called “nutrient-dense” or “nutrient-rich.”

    In the Standard American Diet (SAD), about 6% of the total caloric intake comes from nutrient-rich foods.[citation needed]

    Nutritarians eat a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, onions, mushrooms, whole grains, beans, and berries, and particularly consume leafy greens, which are the most nutrient-dense foods. A nutritarian strives to consume at least 90% of their diet from these foods.

    A nutritarian diet will lower the risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and even such conditions as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.[citation needed]

    Nutritarians do not necessarily exclude animal products. Many nutritarians do choose to be vegan (excluding all animal products). Many vegetarians, however, are not nutritarian, if they frequently consume products containing processed grains, oils, sugars, or salt.

    It takes a bit of education to become a nutritarian. One must learn the relative nutrient density of various foods. For instance, many people are surprised to learn that bok choy has more calcium per calorie than whole milk, and even than “2% fat” milk. The same is true for many other leaf greens.

    so basically it seems like getting the most nutritional bang for the buck.
  • jenilla1
    jenilla1 Posts: 11,142 Member
    I'm cool with that. :drinker:
  • snazzyjazzy21
    snazzyjazzy21 Posts: 1,298 Member
    So basically...no I still don't get it. Are you trying to get the most volume out of what you eat or?
  • trogalicious
    trogalicious Posts: 4,578 Member
    So basically...no I still don't get it. Are you trying to get the most volume out of what you eat or?
    it feels like a "eat cleaner more nutrient dense foods" per calorie type of deal to me.

    just my guess though.
  • Natmarie73
    Natmarie73 Posts: 287 Member
    Sounds like plain old healthy eating to me. Guess I'm a nutritarian by default ha ha.
  • trogalicious
    trogalicious Posts: 4,578 Member
    Sounds like plain old healthy eating to me. Guess I'm a nutritarian by default ha ha.
    same. by that definition, I'm probably.. I dunno.. 85% nutratarian?
    being that the 15% of me would just eat chocolate pudding. no beans.
  • Natmarie73
    Natmarie73 Posts: 287 Member
    I'd be about 80% I reckon. I did have some cake yesterday. BTW you can add red kidney beans to chocolate cake mix for a
    health(ier) more nutritious cake. Don't know about pudding though :smile:
  • lisabinco
    lisabinco Posts: 1,041 Member
    so basically it seems like getting the most nutritional bang for the buck.
    Yeah, that's close. I'd say it's really more about getting the most nutritional bang for every calorie consumed. Basically Health equals Nutrition over Calories.
    Yeah, I think of it as "clean eating" too, squeaky clean eating compared to what I used to do.
    There are citations for all these statements in his book Eat To Live or Eat For Health if you really want to research them. I actually did research several of his citations, so it's all there if you want it.
    It may not be for you, but I've drunk the Kool-Aid on this one.
    It works really well for me, better than anything else I've tried to follow. I'm very pleased to have found an eating plan I can follow easily, makes me feel great, and is good for me.
  • FrankWorsley
    FrankWorsley Posts: 106 Member
    Bump
  • Strokingdiction
    Strokingdiction Posts: 1,164 Member
    So eating a lot of nutrient dense food? That's what I try to do mostly, averaging 70-80% but I refuse to label myself in this respect. I see too many labeled diets and I think people get too caught up in nonsense when that happens.

    I eat. Nothing else required.
  • rml_16
    rml_16 Posts: 16,416 Member
    Quick, somebody Google it!

    Per wiki:
    A nutritarian is a person who has a preference for foods that are high in micronutrients.

    The term “nutritarian” was coined by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. In his book, Eat to Live, he offers this health equation while describing the nutritarian approach to health:

    Health = Nutrients/Calories (or H= N/C for short).

    In other words: the more nutrients you consume per calorie, the healthier you will be.

    Nutrients in the numerator (top part of the equation) include vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals. Since these are found in small quantities in food, they are considered to be micronutrients. Caloric sources in the denominator include the macronutrients: fat, carbohydrate, and protein. We need to meet our micronutrient needs without consuming excessive calories.

    A high N/C diet is also called “nutrient-dense” or “nutrient-rich.”

    In the Standard American Diet (SAD), about 6% of the total caloric intake comes from nutrient-rich foods.[citation needed]

    Nutritarians eat a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, onions, mushrooms, whole grains, beans, and berries, and particularly consume leafy greens, which are the most nutrient-dense foods. A nutritarian strives to consume at least 90% of their diet from these foods.

    A nutritarian diet will lower the risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and even such conditions as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.[citation needed]

    Nutritarians do not necessarily exclude animal products. Many nutritarians do choose to be vegan (excluding all animal products). Many vegetarians, however, are not nutritarian, if they frequently consume products containing processed grains, oils, sugars, or salt.

    It takes a bit of education to become a nutritarian. One must learn the relative nutrient density of various foods. For instance, many people are surprised to learn that bok choy has more calcium per calorie than whole milk, and even than “2% fat” milk. The same is true for many other leaf greens.

    so basically it seems like getting the most nutritional bang for the buck.
    I guess I am. I didn't know there was a name for it ...
  • bcattoes
    bcattoes Posts: 17,303 Member
    Nutritarian. I like it. This is what I strive to be. How I strive to eat. Though sometimes I go astray (curse you peanut butter easter egg!!)
  • Galatea_Stone
    Galatea_Stone Posts: 2,037 Member
    Why does everything have to have an -arian suffix?
  • rml_16
    rml_16 Posts: 16,416 Member
    Why does everything have to have an -arian suffix?
    So we can all be cool. You're not cool if you're not an -arian.

    .....Wait ...
  • tmaryam
    tmaryam Posts: 289 Member
    Why does everything have to have an -arian suffix?

    suffix: -arian

    1.
    (forming adjectives and corresponding nouns) having a concern or belief in a specified thing.
    "antiquarian"

    :happy:
  • bciloveme2014
    bciloveme2014 Posts: 213 Member
    I am not 100% nutritarian, but I do like the concept.