1030 cal and not losing! why! ?

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Replies

  • MaggieLoo79
    MaggieLoo79 Posts: 287 Member
    Thanks for your comments dawnie. It feels good to be understood.
    I've been googling today and feel more confirmed to do more muscle building. This increases metabolism.

    I gain at about 1200 and lose (noticeably) at 950. It seems unfair!!! I've just turned my focus to muscle building also. I'm concentrating on getting plenty of protein. In 2 weeks of weight lifting (5x/week), I lost no weight, but did lose 1.5 inches around my waist. I'll take it!!! Good luck!

  • DawnieB1977
    DawnieB1977 Posts: 4,248 Member
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    I've got a friend with hashimotos, it was shocking to see how fast the weight went on, and once medicated, the weight then came off (obviously with a bit of work).

    Straight from the Mayo Clinic....

    Signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism include:

    Unexplained weight gain — occurring infrequently and rarely exceeding 10 to 20 pounds, most of which is fluid"

    Wow, are you saying my friend is special then? She'll be pleased :)
  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,151 Member
    You're not eating enough.

    Explain how eating more, is going to make someone lose weight.
  • DawnieB1977
    DawnieB1977 Posts: 4,248 Member
    Liftng4Lis wrote: »
    You're not eating enough.

    Explain how eating more, is going to make someone lose weight.

    I lost weight when I started to eat more. I was already losing, but I dropped weight a lot faster when I increased my calories from 1200-1300 to 1500. I was doing a lot of strength training, as well as cardio, as well as working as a teacher on my feet all day, and as well as looking after my 2 children. I think I needed more calories for the strength training to be more effective. This was when I was losing weight after my 2nd baby. Now, losing weight after my 3rd, I am eating 1500-1600 and am losing faster than I lost after my 2nd, when I was initially eating 1200.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    Clawsal wrote: »
    I believe that you do have a slow metabolism (since you seem to log accurately). However I also believe there must be a medical condition in there that maybe could be fixed.

    No, probably not. How do you know she's logging accurately? Sometimes we think we are logging accurately but we are not.

    And how do you know she's not? It's so easy to come on here and say 'you're eating too much, problem fixed'. She states she had a thyroid problem in the past. I've got a friend with hashimotos, it was shocking to see how fast the weight went on, and once medicated, the weight then came off (obviously with a bit of work). Had my friend not pushed the doctor to check, she'd never have been diagnosed.

    Also, if the op has been eating the same way for years and is within healthy BMI, she's probably not overeating or she'd have gained.

    Like I said, no-one jumps all over the people in the gaining weight forum telling them they can't possibly have a high metabolism, so why is it so difficult to believe that someone can have a low metabolism? Some people need to eat 4000 calories to gain weight, some people have to eat below 1200 to lose, especially if they've been doing that for years.

    I agree with people who've said do some strength training.
    In her original post, she said she has an efficient metabolism. In a latter post she said it could indeed be thyroid, but she does not know . Please point me to where she said she has had thyroid issues in the past.

    99.9% of the time, people come here with asking why they are not losing weight when they are only eating 800, 900, 1000, or even 1200 calories a day. Even if their diary looks good, there is always the problem of underestimating food intake by choosing incorrect entries from the database, as well as overestimating calories burned through exercise. I can share a few examples:

    Had salmon (and it was great! :D) Three different entries had 1 oz/28 grams: 28 calories, 30 some odd calories, and another about 48. Well, I know from my research that an ounce of salmon has around 58 calories. That's quite a difference in calories.

    Went for a great run. The treadmill renders me 500 calories for a 45 minute run, MFP says I've burned about 450 calories, but....wait a minute....my heart rate monitor says I've only burned 350 calories. Those are big differences as well.

    Well, if I were to unwittingly choose the lower calorie salmon and the higher calorie exercise burn, my net calorie consumption would definitely come in lower, making me think there is something wrong with me rather than my tracking.

    Logging is the first place to look. Many people here have commented that they've thought their metabolism was shot only to figure out it was a food logging issue. Once that was straightened out, people started losing weight again. By the way, I am one of those people who thought my metabolism was shot only to figure out I was eating too much.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    Liftng4Lis wrote: »
    You're not eating enough.

    Explain how eating more, is going to make someone lose weight.

    I lost weight when I started to eat more. I was already losing, but I dropped weight a lot faster when I increased my calories from 1200-1300 to 1500. I was doing a lot of strength training, as well as cardio, as well as working as a teacher on my feet all day, and as well as looking after my 2 children. I think I needed more calories for the strength training to be more effective. This was when I was losing weight after my 2nd baby. Now, losing weight after my 3rd, I am eating 1500-1600 and am losing faster than I lost after my 2nd, when I was initially eating 1200.

    Eating more tyo lose weight is a common misconception.

    Even though you increased your calories you were still in a calorie deficit. It sounds like you were properly fueling your body, which in turn gave you more energy to move more throughout your day, which created a a bigger deficit than you realized.

    Weight loss is calories in/calories out.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    Clawsal wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    Clawsal wrote: »
    I believe that you do have a slow metabolism (since you seem to log accurately). However I also believe there must be a medical condition in there that maybe could be fixed.

    No, probably not. How do you know she's logging accurately? Sometimes we think we are logging accurately but we are not.

    Well, I don't know. But since she said
    I am weighing everything before I eat.
    I went back to see what you meant with "servings" . I only eat homemade food. Soo I weigh all the ingredients the recipe and divide the finished dish into servings. That is how the serving is measured. So I know the calories are accurate.

    She seems to be logging accurately.

    Your "one fits all" answer that "you are eating more than you think" doesn't seem appropriate here.

    Nah, it's appropriate. :) Logging is the first thing to look at.

    Please read my post above to Dawnie. It is really easy to miscalculate calories even though we believe we are accurately logging. i know, I've did it early on. Once I did research on foods at the USDA and started accurately logging, I started losing weight.

    Homemade food is easy to miscalculate as well, unless you are sure each serving is equal and weighs the same, thus has the same amount of calories.
  • Elsie_Brownraisin
    Elsie_Brownraisin Posts: 786 Member
    edited February 2015
    alonzoq03 wrote: »
    You need to start doing bodyweight training. Cardio excercise alone sometimes is not enough for weight loss, instead it can only put your metabolism in a stall. Try some muscle building excercises like the ones shown on apps like Fitstar. It has worked for me. Good luck on your reaching your goal.

    Eh?

    All exercise burns calories and cardio won't put your metabolism in a stall (whatever that means).

    I know many people who have lost weight, ranging from a little fluff to a veritable fuckton, with running as their 'only' exercise.

    I'm not saying weight lifting isn't good either (I do both) but I really don't understand the hatred for cardio. What 'slows my metabolism' is beer, it's never the decision to swim a couple of miles.

    OP: I don't have anything to add other than checking in with your Dr. But chosing a particular type of exercise over another won't slow your metabolism.
  • CharlieBeansmomTracey
    CharlieBeansmomTracey Posts: 7,702 Member
    Thanks for your comments dawnie. It feels good to be understood.
    I've been googling today and feel more confirmed to do more muscle building. This increases metabolism.

    I gain at about 1200 and lose (noticeably) at 950. It seems unfair!!! I've just turned my focus to muscle building also. I'm concentrating on getting plenty of protein. In 2 weeks of weight lifting (5x/week), I lost no weight, but did lose 1.5 inches around my waist. I'll take it!!! Good luck!
    why do people think that lifting weights will build muscle when you are eating at a deficit? you are not going to build muscle eating in a caloric deficit. its just not going to happen. you have to eat at a surplus to build muscle mass. you can lift to preserve muscle you already have, but gaining it comes from a surplus.you can burn some fat weight lifting(thus losing inches) and your muscles can retain water (which may look like you are gaining mass) after lifting(to repair themselves) but its not true gains.also 5 days a week to lift? you need to give your muscles time to repair themselves.take a day or two off from lifting
  • gypsy_spirit
    gypsy_spirit Posts: 2,107 Member
    edited February 2015
    AnzhelaZ wrote: »
    In order to lose weight, you have to 1) consume slow carbs or fewer of them 2) work out somewhat 3) maintain a calorie count above your maintenance. this means that if you have set your profile on weight loss, in the end of the day you should see a red line with up to 100-200 kcal above the set goal. This way your body won't be stressed by what you're doing.

    If you maintain a calorie count above your maintenance - you will gain weight. You will be eating more calories than it takes to maintain your weight. The red line you speak of, means you have exceeded your calories for the day. You are over. Although you may not be over your maintenance at that point - you will find it hard to lose doing this.
  • grantwashere
    grantwashere Posts: 174 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    I've been eating quite on target. I've always known that I have a frustratingly efficient metabolism. But I don't understand how I can not be losing weight with what I eat! ?
    I would be thankful for some constructive input! Thanks

    Because you're not eating 1030 calories.

    You are eating more than you think you are.

    Weigh your solid food and measure liquids, ensure you are using correct food entries, eat only about half your exercise calories back because MFP and Gym machine burns are overestimated.

    The only requirement to lose weight is to eat less calories than you burn, but how you fulfill that requirement (dietary plan) is up to you.

    ^^^Totally this^^^
  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,151 Member
    Liftng4Lis wrote: »
    You're not eating enough.

    Explain how eating more, is going to make someone lose weight.

    I lost weight when I started to eat more. I was already losing, but I dropped weight a lot faster when I increased my calories from 1200-1300 to 1500. I was doing a lot of strength training, as well as cardio, as well as working as a teacher on my feet all day, and as well as looking after my 2 children. I think I needed more calories for the strength training to be more effective. This was when I was losing weight after my 2nd baby. Now, losing weight after my 3rd, I am eating 1500-1600 and am losing faster than I lost after my 2nd, when I was initially eating 1200.

    So you defy science?
    How long exactly, did you give, to test between the raise from 1300 to 1500? Was it possible you were initially not considering water retention, hormones or daily fluctuations? All of these are unknown.
    Most people hit plateaus or stalls, because of inaccurate logging. CICO. The average person, is not going to start losing by eating more. It doesn't work that way.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,056 Member
    If I'm not losing eating 1200 calories, it makes no sense that I'll start losing if I bump my calories up to 1500...
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,534 Member
    It has to work both ways - the equivalent argument is that to GAIN weight, someone should drop to less than 1200 calories/day.

    Which is patently ridiculous.
  • happyfeetrebel1
    happyfeetrebel1 Posts: 1,004 Member
    AnzhelaZ wrote: »
    In order to lose weight, you have to 1) consume slow carbs or fewer of them 2) work out somewhat 3) maintain a calorie count above your maintenance. this means that if you have set your profile on weight loss, in the end of the day you should see a red line with up to 100-200 kcal above the set goal. This way your body won't be stressed by what you're doing.


    Every single thing here is incorrect. Stop that
  • acquilla30
    acquilla30 Posts: 147 Member
    yasmine334 wrote: »
    I'm at a healthy weight but at the top end of BMI.
    Maybe it is just slow going when you are trying to adjust a little. Thanks. That's encouraging.
    P.s. unfortunately, when I surpass 1100cal. I gain. :( I have a really really efficient metabolism. I just don't need much. Have healthy hair and nails etc.

    This is very strange. According to your height and BMI your resting metabolic rate is 1350-1500 cal/day . Which means if you just sit in your bed all day doing nothing your body needs "at least" these 1350 cal for your vital organs to function. And since you are not obese or overweight this means you dont have any energy reserves. Please consult a dietian because 1100 cal/day will eventually harm your body and decrease muscle mass.
    Mr_Knight wrote: »
    I've got a friend with hashimotos, it was shocking to see how fast the weight went on, and once medicated, the weight then came off (obviously with a bit of work).

    Straight from the Mayo Clinic....

    Signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism include:

    Unexplained weight gain — occurring infrequently and rarely exceeding 10 to 20 pounds, most of which is fluid"

    I personally went from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroid and I gained more than that. For me to lose I have to typically eat under a thousand calories and workout. If I ate over 1300 calories, I gain weight. It is very hard to lose weight being hypothyroid and easy to gain weight. Read some stories from real people, you would be surprised.
  • MKEgal
    MKEgal Posts: 3,252 Member
    "Most weight loss occurs because of decreased caloric intake.
    However, evidence shows the only way to maintain weight loss is to be engaged in regular physical activity."
    http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/physical_activity/index.html

    Most likely you are eating more than you think.
    I know you don't want to hear that, but several people have pointed out that by choosing different entries you can get vastly different calorie counts.
    Also, you have things in your diary which are labeled "homemade", or "Jane's recipe", or things like that.
    Unless _you've_ made the dish and put the recipe into your MFP account, don't use anything that says "homemade". Use a name brand that's most similar to what you've eaten, or search for USDA.

    Also, ignore exercise calories (usually). Once in a while if you're really hungry at the end of the day, have 1/3 - 1/2 of them for a snack.

    And with having so little to lose, esp. since you say you're already at a healthy weight, it's going to go slowly.
    AnzhelaZ wrote:
    In order to lose weight, you have to ... maintain a calorie count above your maintenance.
    No, it needs to be below maintenance. Eating more than you need leads to gaining weight.

    But you're right about eating fewer carbs leading to more weight loss. Still have to stay in the healthy macro ranges though.
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/blog/MKEgal/view/2014-08-09-high-protein-diet-685553
    why do people think that lifting weights will build muscle when you are eating at a deficit? you are not going to build muscle eating in a caloric deficit. its just not going to happen. you have to eat at a surplus to build muscle mass.
    According to this calculator, I've lost 81 lb of fat while also gaining 4 lb of lean body mass. I would have been happy just to maintain the muscle mass while losing fat.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    MKEgal wrote: »
    "Most weight loss occurs because of decreased caloric intake.
    However, evidence shows the only way to maintain weight loss is to be engaged in regular physical activity."
    http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/physical_activity/index.html

    No, engaging in regular activity is not the only way to maintain weight, but it is one of the ways, plus it provides great health benefits. Think about all the people out there who can't exercise, or who just don't want to, who maintain their weight.
    Most likely you are eating more than you think.
    I know you don't want to hear that, but several people have pointed out that by choosing different entries you can get vastly different calorie counts.
    Also, you have things in your diary which are labeled "homemade", or "Jane's recipe", or things like that.
    Unless _you've_ made the dish and put the recipe into your MFP account, don't use anything that says "homemade". Use a name brand that's most similar to what you've eaten, or search for USDA.

    I agree. Accurate calorie counting is key to ensure accuracy.
    Also, ignore exercise calories (usually). Once in a while if you're really hungry at the end of the day, have 1/3 - 1/2 of them for a snack.

    No, because MFP's set up does not include exercise calories. The only exercise that should not be logged is weight lifting because there is no way to figure out the actual calorie count. Cardio should always be logged and a portion of those exercise calories eaten back. Why? Because you need to properly fuel your body.
    And with having so little to lose, esp. since you say you're already at a healthy weight, it's going to go slowly.

    Agreed.
    AnzhelaZ wrote:
    In order to lose weight, you have to ... maintain a calorie count above your maintenance.
    No, it needs to be below maintenance. Eating more than you need leads to gaining weight.

    But you're right about eating fewer carbs leading to more weight loss. Still have to stay in the healthy macro ranges though.
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/blog/MKEgal/view/2014-08-09-high-protein-diet-685553

    I wonder if AnzhelaZ made an error and meant to say to eat below maintenance?

    Eating fewer carbs does not lead to more fat loss, it leads to water loss. There is a big difference.
    why do people think that lifting weights will build muscle when you are eating at a deficit? you are not going to build muscle eating in a caloric deficit. its just not going to happen. you have to eat at a surplus to build muscle mass.
    According to this calculator, I've lost 81 lb of fat while also gaining 4 lb of lean body mass. I would have been happy just to maintain the muscle mass while losing fat.

    Calculators are an estimate only and often not all that accurate. Have you had DEXA testing to confirm this? Really, I would take any online calculator with a grain of salt.

    Muscle is very difficult to build, especially for us women, and it takes some serious weight lifting. It's common to get some newbie gains, and to build some muscle if you're obese, if you are weight lifting, and this is all very intentional and involves a lot of hard work.