If I lived alone, I would not have trigger items in my kitchen. Instead I live with a wonderful cook

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Replies

  • Ellaskat
    Ellaskat Posts: 386 Member
    I live with a wonderful chef too - he does high ends events - even did Chelsea Clinton's wedding. That's just an excuse to get in your way though. Though I've NEVER cooked for us in the 12 years we've lived together, I am now. Ive taken over all our cooking and he's letting me. As the result I've lost 12 pounds in 9 weeks. You can too. Just get rid of your excuses and get to work. My husband supports me in my goal to be healthier, and thinner. IF yours doesn't, sounds like there are bigger issues than 'trigger' foods in the house.
  • ShellyBell999
    ShellyBell999 Posts: 1,482 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I'll take one fry off my husband's plate. I control temptation by allowing it in moderation. Try mindful eating.

    A good cook is a terrible thing to waste.

    Only one??? That's just a tease, I take 17, then I'm satisfied and still using moderation
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
    I'm the wonderful cook in my household. Every day I am constantly triggered by whatever I am making up. I cooked a wonderful pie even this weekend for Pi day. No one else wanted to eat it, so I ended up devouring the whole thing.
    I love to cook. My granddaughter loves to cook with me. How can I pass that up? What I do is give away the food I don't need. My granddaughter and I are well-known and well-liked in our neighbourhood, LOL!
  • slideaway1
    slideaway1 Posts: 1,006 Member
    Steph38878 wrote: »
    @slideaway1. If you grill everything, slice zucchini, squash, eggplant... Season and grill them. Mrs. Dash table blend is a great option.

    Last year, I started slicing green tomatoes, toss with olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper and lemon juice then grill. They're good if you like green tomatoes.

    Thank you kindly. :)
    Ellaskat wrote: »
    I live with a wonderful chef too - he does high ends events - even did Chelsea Clinton's wedding. That's just an excuse to get in your way though. Though I've NEVER cooked for us in the 12 years we've lived together, I am now. Ive taken over all our cooking and he's letting me. As the result I've lost 12 pounds in 9 weeks. You can too. Just get rid of your excuses and get to work. My husband supports me in my goal to be healthier, and thinner. IF yours doesn't, sounds like there are bigger issues than 'trigger' foods in the house.

    What does Chelsea Clinton eat? She looks like a kebab kind of girl? And we all know what her dad eats!!! Who's with me?...anybody..?

  • jvt63
    jvt63 Posts: 89 Member
    They're not "trigger" foods. They're just foods.

    I definitely do have trigger foods, and I'll say it in front of God and everyone. For me, it's masochistic to have cheese doodles and pita chips in the house. I have more peace when I accept that I have no control over these foods. I don't feel diminished in any way. But to each his own.
  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
    DaneanP wrote: »
    I always wonder about Padma on Top Chef. How the heck does she say so trim eating all that food??

    I don't know who she is, but generally, people who stay slim despite being around good food a lot do it the same way the rest of us do: By eating less than they burn.

    Look, in France, the food is very rich and delicious, and made with butter, full fat, lots of bread and croissant and cheese and cream and good wine. The people are statistically far less likely to be overweight than Americans are. Why? Partly genetics, sure. But mostly it's because they eat in moderation, and they lead much more active lifestyles.

    Just because it's there doesn't mean you have to eat all of it.
  • NewMeSM75
    NewMeSM75 Posts: 971 Member

    I don't know who she is, but generally, people who stay slim despite being around good food a lot do it the same way the rest of us do: By eating less than they burn.

    Look, in France, the food is very rich and delicious, and made with butter, full fat, lots of bread and croissant and cheese and cream and good wine. The people are statistically far less likely to be overweight than Americans are. Why? Partly genetics, sure. But mostly it's because they eat in moderation, and they lead much more active lifestyles.

    Just because it's there doesn't mean you have to eat all of it.

    Totally agree!

  • dubird
    dubird Posts: 1,849 Member
    Yeah, there's a reason I don't actually buy snacks normally. My husband does a lot of the cooking, but really, that's easier to deal with since cooking for yourself tends to be healthier. You know, unless you make homemade 5 cheese mac and cheese. *noooooom*

    But seriously, if it bugs you, ask him to keep his snacks in a seperate location. Out of sight, out of mind. Encourage him to cook healthier recipes. Or, find new recipes that will fit better into your calorie goal and ask him to try them for you.
  • WinoGelato
    WinoGelato Posts: 13,454 Member
    OP - your husband is a wonderful cook. That's awesome! What sorts of things does he cook? Is he aware of your weight loss goals? What is your strategy for weight loss - are you practicing moderation, restricting certain types of foods, etc? Can you work together to plan meals and find new recipes for him to try to challenge his culinary skills?



  • charlie_anne
    charlie_anne Posts: 46 Member
    Smaller plate for me and as my other half doesn't like veggies I'll cook some for me and then have them instead of potatoes/pasta. He is a great cook so can be hard!
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,532 Member
    jvt63 wrote: »
    If I find "his" food (chips, chocolate, etc.), I throw it out and deal with his tantrums. I've asked him nicely, for years, to please keep it in his car, or hide it, but he's ignored my requests. I've thrown it out twice now. I doubt I'll have to do it a third time.

    I would not accept that behaviour from anybody - if my partner insisted on throwing my stuff out like that, we'd be going our separate ways.

    That's completely un-partnerly behaviour....
  • azulvioleta6
    azulvioleta6 Posts: 4,196 Member
    I AM a wonderful cook. One of my best friends is a chef and he begs me to cook for him. :)

    You just have to exercise some self control.

    I've stopped baking bread and sweets entirely, which is kind of sad because I have a huge set of skills that I can no longer use. Oh well.
  • RodaRose
    RodaRose Posts: 9,562 Member
    AsK your chef to expand his/her repertoire. Or ask to him/her to cook with less oil-- or whatever you need. That is what I had my hubby do. He is the cook in our house. He has learned to "stir fry" Swiss chard or such with garlic and onions with no oils. Also he happily lets me take a larger role. Lately, I have been doing the shopping so that he cooks whatever I bring home.
  • callsitlikeiseeit
    callsitlikeiseeit Posts: 8,627 Member
    i married a chef, which is how i got to 250 LOL!

    he had a stroke though, several years ago (and is now partially paralyzed) so now the kitchen is my domain lol
  • otheliemoor
    otheliemoor Posts: 50 Member
    Someone might have brought this up before, but what about talking to him about the foods you are struggling with? You know, like an adult.
  • Briargrey
    Briargrey Posts: 498 Member
    Self-control, willpower, moderation, wanting to lose weight more than you want to overeat. You know - the same the rest of us find long-term success.

    And calling foods 'trigger' foods and deciding you're helpless in the face of them is really just an excuse for the majority of the population. Maybe you're the very special snowflake with some chemical disorder that impacts willpower, but guess what, I doubt it.

    Now, being AWARE of what foods (or food groups) 'trigger' you and adapting to it without becoming all helpless? That's fine. I knew Dr. Pepper was my gateway drug -- if I had one, I wouldn't want to stop. But I still decided I wasn't going to oust them entirely - I decided that I had a calorie goal and I was going to stick to it, and if I wanted to leave room and have a soda, I would. I've chosen to not have soda for over 2 years now, but I recognize that *I* am the one in control, not my love for the big Doc.

    So yeah - figure out what sets you off. In the beginning, try maybe to minimize exposure, but also be working on building up an 'immunity' to giving in to those overeating cravings. Just DECIDE to stick to your goal and do it.

    Last week was a special week. We were going to go out to dinner somewhere and I knew that I actually didn't want to worry about 'fitting it in' that day, so I made the conscious decision to not worry. I didn't fret and think 'omg, it's the end of it all, I'm going to have one night of expensive gorging on seafood and that's all she wrote.' Instead, like a rational adult, I worked out more in the days leading up to my trip, and I'm working out more this week, and I downed about three pounds of lobster and shrimp without regret, ate a pizza the next night when we wound up staying away a night longer, and jumped right back into fitting my calorie goals in when I got home.

    You can do it. You can. You just have to want to.

    Oh and to the person who throws away her husband's food? Wow. Just. Wow. I'd be finding a new husband and justifiably so. Again - make it fit, or don't put it in your mouth. In a perfect world, it would be nice if, at the beginning while someone adjusts themselves to eating in a more mindful fashion, if some of those foods arent' around - but you have to assume they will be and just DECIDE.
  • JoRumbles
    JoRumbles Posts: 262 Member
    I am a good cook and my husband is an improving cook. Tonight he made sticky chicken and homemade coleslaw, all for under 400 cals and it was delicious. We have been making a lot of dinners out of the "Hairy Dieters" cook books and everything is delicious and each meal is <500 calories. I just have to watch the portion control- because often it says "serves 4" and he cooks the lot for both of us!

    So my advice- suggest some recipes for more adventurous things that your husband could make for you
  • segacs
    segacs Posts: 4,599 Member
    edited March 2015
    jvt63 wrote: »
    I definitely do have trigger foods, and I'll say it in front of God and everyone. For me, it's masochistic to have cheese doodles and pita chips in the house. I have more peace when I accept that I have no control over these foods. I don't feel diminished in any way. But to each his own.

    I used to tell myself the same thing about chocolate. I'd swear I was addicted to chocolate, that there was no way in heck that I could have chocolate in the house without eating all of it.

    Then, you know what? One day, I woke up and I decided that I was using it as an excuse, and that it was silly and self-defeating. So I stopped.

    Now I have chocolate in the house constantly, and I eat it a little bit at a time, within my calorie goals. And I enjoy it a lot more.

    Trigger foods, for most of us, are just a myth. You're stronger than those cheese doodles. You just have to decide that you are.

    jvt63 wrote: »
    If I find "his" food (chips, chocolate, etc.), I throw it out and deal with his tantrums. I've asked him nicely, for years, to please keep it in his car, or hide it, but he's ignored my requests. I've thrown it out twice now. I doubt I'll have to do it a third time.

    Wait, you actually throw out his food? Are you kidding me? Grow up and act like an adult!

    Do you go around to strangers at restaurants and throw their food out, too, because you find it triggering?
  • LAWoman72
    LAWoman72 Posts: 2,846 Member
    edited March 2015
    I find foods only act like "triggers" for me when I'm telling myself I CAN'T have them. In other words, if I think of a certain food as a "bad" food, then when I do get my hands on it, it's like a Last Supper. ZOMG ALL THE APPLE PIE.

    When I don't do that, I don't need to binge, because I can have it today, and I can have it tomorrow, and if I feel like it and have the calories for it, heck, I can have it twice on the following day if that's what I want. Knowing I can have more takes away that "Eat it ALL...NOW" feeling.

    Until I figured this out, I thought the actual food itself was physically triggering me. YMMV. :)
  • Athijade
    Athijade Posts: 3,242 Member
    jvt63 wrote: »
    If I find "his" food (chips, chocolate, etc.), I throw it out and deal with his tantrums. I've asked him nicely, for years, to please keep it in his car, or hide it, but he's ignored my requests. I've thrown it out twice now. I doubt I'll have to do it a third time.

    I'm guessing since you are married that you are an adult... but it's really hard to tell that from this post. It is sad that you feel the need to act in this sort of way. Sorry, but you are not more important then he is. It is his house as well as yours and thus he has the "right" to keep food he likes in HIS home.