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Proper things to say to coworkers or people you don't know as well...

245

Replies

  • amgreenwell
    amgreenwell Posts: 1,268 Member
    I had a similar problem at work with people making inappropriate comments. I just tell them I'm trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle. I'm NOT dieting and I'm NOT denying myself anything, I now choose not to put those types of foods into my body. Or if I do choose to eat a burger, then I just do it. Because you now work out and eat healthy doesn't mean you can't "treat" yourself. Don't let anyone get you down. Your accomplishments are real and you deserve praise. Not judgement!
  • besaro
    besaro Posts: 1,859 Member
    I face(d) the same thing when I first became a vegetarian. I have come to learn to not care if I offend others with my choice not to eat meat, and do not care that they judge me for my choices. And like someone else said, its most likely more in our heads than actually happening. its just *kitten* FOOD!
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 39,842 Member
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    I work in corporate America where there are doughnuts, pizza, and crap brought in all day long. There's always lunch dates, where people are constantly scrutinizing what I eat I feel like. I have become great at saying NO. Which is a huge NSV, because I've always been a foodie. But, I just don't find the worth in it because I feel like crap the rest of the day if I do munch down on these.

    I thought this would be overcoming the battle, but I've noticed that's not the case. Everytime I order a salad, or so no to the crap in general, I feel like I'm being judged. And it's really starting to bother me. I always get the line "well you need to treat yourself now and again" or "oh come on you've lost a lot already, don't be so concerned about it." Don't get me wrong, I know it's important to "cheat" (I actually hate that word to describe it) but I feel so much better holding on to my healthy habits mentally and physically. How would you think it was appropriate to respond to these people? Because I feel as if I'm coming off snobby or annoyed everytime I hear one of these comments but it is getting so frustrating!

    For one thing, perception isn't always reality...I would imagine that some of this is just hypersensitivity on your part which is normal considering that this is fairly new to you I would imagine. In general, I have found that people are overwhelmingly self absorbed and really aren't paying a whole lot of attention to anything else.

    In terms of the "treat yourself" stuff...you can you know...but beyond that, you better get used to it...most people eat like *kitten* and don't care..being a health and fitness buff is kind of a lonely gig until you meet the right people.

    I always get the, "hey...there's the wolfman...trying to live forever." They're mostly just kidding around these days...I'm going on 3 years into all of this and they can pretty much take one good look at me and...well...let's just say, they know I kick some *kitten*.
  • blossomingbutterfly
    blossomingbutterfly Posts: 743 Member
    I'd say if you can, ignore them and eat what you want. If you want your salad, eat it! No one can tell you what to eat.
  • sofaking6
    sofaking6 Posts: 4,589 Member
    edited March 2015
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    To be honest, most people do not want to see you make it where they have failed. Your success highlights their lack of success, your determination reminds them of every time they tried and gave up because it was too hard.

    Just because they lack self control doesn't mean you should let them influence you. They aren't saying these things to help you out, they are saying them so that they feel better about their own lack of discipline. Subconsciously or not, they are projecting this out on you. Some people will even deliberately try to sabotage your quest for self improvement, even your partner or your family, I *kitten* you not.

    How to respond? It's easy, be assertive, tell them no. Don't let other people distract you from your goal. Ultimately the choice is yours.

    See, I call B.S. on this. I hate how people automatically assume that every comment is about jealousy and inner turmoil. Sometimes people just talk to talk and it has NOTHING to do with their own fitness goals, diet goals or self esteem. I think it's rude and arrogant to assume such and it sets up a "them v. me" dynamic that may not truly be there.

    Sometimes, people just talk to fill up space, to make conversation, to show an interest. It's better to just let it roll off with the attitude that they meant nothing by it, then to get all offended and then, in turn, judge them right back.

    But they are literally telling me I should be doing the opposite from what I am, I would NEVER say that to them because they might be making lesser choices than I am. Good for them, they don't need to lose. I don't know why a department of 70 people would be consistently making the same "conversation topic"

    Why not ask? "You seem really determined to see me eat, and especially to see me eat things I don't want to eat. Can you please tell me why that is?"

  • PeachyPlum
    PeachyPlum Posts: 1,243 Member
    "I'll think about what you've said" *goes back to whatever she was eating/doing*

    "Thanks, but I'm going to do the exact opposite of that."

    "Wow." *pointed look*

    "I'll just stick to eating what I prefer."

    "Thanks, but I've made my choice."

    Repeat until they stop meddling...
  • Jerseygrrl
    Jerseygrrl Posts: 189 Member
    I have a coworker who actually brings the piece of cake, the doughnut, the cookie to my office and puts it on my desk. It doesn't matter how many times I've said no thank you. Now, I just throw it in the trash. It may sound childish, but I'm done "being polite." If others can't respect my boundaries, I don't need to spare their "feelings."
  • scottacular
    scottacular Posts: 597 Member
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    I work in corporate America where there are doughnuts, pizza, and crap brought in all day long. There's always lunch dates, where people are constantly scrutinizing what I eat I feel like. I have become great at saying NO. Which is a huge NSV, because I've always been a foodie. But, I just don't find the worth in it because I feel like crap the rest of the day if I do munch down on these.

    I thought this would be overcoming the battle, but I've noticed that's not the case. Everytime I order a salad, or so no to the crap in general, I feel like I'm being judged. And it's really starting to bother me. I always get the line "well you need to treat yourself now and again" or "oh come on you've lost a lot already, don't be so concerned about it." Don't get me wrong, I know it's important to "cheat" (I actually hate that word to describe it) but I feel so much better holding on to my healthy habits mentally and physically. How would you think it was appropriate to respond to these people? Because I feel as if I'm coming off snobby or annoyed everytime I hear one of these comments but it is getting so frustrating!

    You could just make up something like how you need to manage blood sugar levels or you have an allergy to something, etc. But probably best if you keep insisting that you don't want these offerings and if they can't accept that, it's their problem. Never feel awkward about turning down food you don't want.
  • AislingHunter
    AislingHunter Posts: 71 Member
    PRMinx wrote: »
    Because it's civil convention. They aren't telling you want to do really, they are probably trying to be nice. When you say you can't have something because you are on a diet, it's human nature to respond, "Hey - you look great. Treat yourself."

    And it's arrogant and rude to diagnose people by saying they are projecting or lacking self discipline. That's ridiculous.

    I understand it's annoying, but if you think the world is out to get you all the time, then you will drive yourself crazy. I would honestly stop trying to be offended and let it roll off your shoulder.

    Have you never had people try to sabotage your diet before? I haven't had it much, but I know someone who gets it a lot.
  • mcgra263
    mcgra263 Posts: 23 Member
    PRMinx wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    To be honest, most people do not want to see you make it where they have failed. Your success highlights their lack of success, your determination reminds them of every time they tried and gave up because it was too hard.

    Just because they lack self control doesn't mean you should let them influence you. They aren't saying these things to help you out, they are saying them so that they feel better about their own lack of discipline. Subconsciously or not, they are projecting this out on you. Some people will even deliberately try to sabotage your quest for self improvement, even your partner or your family, I *kitten* you not.

    How to respond? It's easy, be assertive, tell them no. Don't let other people distract you from your goal. Ultimately the choice is yours.

    See, I call B.S. on this. I hate how people automatically assume that every comment is about jealousy and inner turmoil. Sometimes people just talk to talk and it has NOTHING to do with their own fitness goals, diet goals or self esteem. I think it's rude and arrogant to assume such and it sets up a "them v. me" dynamic that may not truly be there.

    Sometimes, people just talk to fill up space, to make conversation, to show an interest. It's better to just let it roll off with the attitude that they meant nothing by it, then to get all offended and then, in turn, judge them right back.

    But they are literally telling me I should be doing the opposite from what I am, I would NEVER say that to them because they might be making lesser choices than I am. Good for them, they don't need to lose. I don't know why a department of 70 people would be consistently making the same "conversation topic"

    Because it's civil convention. They aren't telling you want to do really, they are probably trying to be nice. When you say you can't have something because you are on a diet, it's human nature to respond, "Hey - you look great. Treat yourself."

    And it's arrogant and rude to diagnose people by saying they are projecting or lacking self discipline. That's ridiculous.

    I understand it's annoying, but if you think the world is out to get you all the time, then you will drive yourself crazy. I would honestly stop trying to be offended and let it roll off your shoulder.

    Don't need to be offended, just to keep focused on #1 so you don't let other people distract you from your fitness goals.

    Just as people can support you and motivate you to better yourself, a lot of people will always resent your success and a few will try to undermine your effort.

    "You have to remember something: Everybody pities the weak; jealousy you have to earn" - Arnold Schwarzenegger

    I think it's silly to think that everyone is jealous of me. I don't walk around thinking that way - and I'm glad I don't.

    Okay, let me set the record straight. I don't think anyone is jealous of me, and you're not helping by making that assumption. I'm simply trying to get some feedback, because people are constantly making comments about my "rabbit food" and how I don't eat enough. So they ARE scrutinizing it, even if it's not in a negative conotation. Scrutinize means they are analyzing it with crtical attention. It's not that I necessarily mean all these people are trying to thwart my improved lifestyle, and it's not that I think these people are doing it intentionally. And yes, I've overcome an eating disorder so I do have some sort of hypersensitivity to people paying attention to what I eat. But, I also know the number of comments I get are unnecessary from CERTAIN people. Some people are great and are the first ones to let me know that when people bring in doughnuts, they also brought in a variety of fresh fruit. It was simply an idea generator to help me when the people who are being blatant about their assumptions on my lifestyle, and that I do not want to come off rude myself.
  • TEZofAllTrades
    TEZofAllTrades Posts: 51 Member
    I get what you're talking about. It can feel like you're isolating yourself. There's not an easy way to solve that since the solution would have to affect the different personality types and opinions of a group.

    Instead try a change of tact! Earn some "brownie" points by bringing in some treats of your own for your colleagues. Some homemade healthy-version brownies or something? Then you can get chatting about how they're actually surprisingly low cal etc. This will also give you something guilt-free to snack on should you want to join in the snack break.

    Hope this helps :smile:
  • AbsoluteTara79
    AbsoluteTara79 Posts: 266 Member
    edited March 2015
    Let's say they are judging. So what? Actually answer that for yourself. Does their judgement matter?

    Second, treat it as a compliment on your efforts and respond as such. Even if you feel like it's judgement and very well may be.

    Example:

    "C'mon, you deserve a treat".

    "Awww, thank you. But I'm good with what I'm ordering!"

    This is light-hearted, work-appropriate, and doesn't open the door for further meddling on their part.

    Good luck.

  • PeachyPlum
    PeachyPlum Posts: 1,243 Member
    Jerseygrrl wrote: »
    I have a coworker who actually brings the piece of cake, the doughnut, the cookie to my office and puts it on my desk. It doesn't matter how many times I've said no thank you. Now, I just throw it in the trash. It may sound childish, but I'm done "being polite." If others can't respect my boundaries, I don't need to spare their "feelings."

    Oh, this guy. At my office he literally puts the treat on his outstretched palm and puts it in front of my nose. Like offering a sugar cube to a horse.

    I loudly say "No thank you." And then stare him in the eye until he places it on my desk, at which point I announce to the whole office "If anyone would like some cake, there is extra on my desk."

    It's awkward for everyone but me...
  • mcgra263
    mcgra263 Posts: 23 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    I work in corporate America where there are doughnuts, pizza, and crap brought in all day long. There's always lunch dates, where people are constantly scrutinizing what I eat I feel like. I have become great at saying NO. Which is a huge NSV, because I've always been a foodie. But, I just don't find the worth in it because I feel like crap the rest of the day if I do munch down on these.

    I thought this would be overcoming the battle, but I've noticed that's not the case. Everytime I order a salad, or so no to the crap in general, I feel like I'm being judged. And it's really starting to bother me. I always get the line "well you need to treat yourself now and again" or "oh come on you've lost a lot already, don't be so concerned about it." Don't get me wrong, I know it's important to "cheat" (I actually hate that word to describe it) but I feel so much better holding on to my healthy habits mentally and physically. How would you think it was appropriate to respond to these people? Because I feel as if I'm coming off snobby or annoyed everytime I hear one of these comments but it is getting so frustrating!

    For one thing, perception isn't always reality...I would imagine that some of this is just hypersensitivity on your part which is normal considering that this is fairly new to you I would imagine. In general, I have found that people are overwhelmingly self absorbed and really aren't paying a whole lot of attention to anything else.

    In terms of the "treat yourself" stuff...you can you know...but beyond that, you better get used to it...most people eat like *kitten* and don't care..being a health and fitness buff is kind of a lonely gig until you meet the right people.

    I always get the, "hey...there's the wolfman...trying to live forever." They're mostly just kidding around these days...I'm going on 3 years into all of this and they can pretty much take one good look at me and...well...let's just say, they know I kick some *kitten*.

    You're right, I've always been hypersensitive about people making comments about what I'm eating or not eating. Stems from years of an eating disorder so that's probably where MOST of it stems from. But I swear if I get one more comment about my rabbit food I think I'm going to lose it haha.
  • sofaking6
    sofaking6 Posts: 4,589 Member
    Jerseygrrl wrote: »
    I have a coworker who actually brings the piece of cake, the doughnut, the cookie to my office and puts it on my desk. It doesn't matter how many times I've said no thank you. Now, I just throw it in the trash. It may sound childish, but I'm done "being polite." If others can't respect my boundaries, I don't need to spare their "feelings."

    You should take a picture every day before you throw it out, then put together a photo montage of "food you wasted trying to be a *kitten* to me".
  • tinascar2015
    tinascar2015 Posts: 413 Member
    Years ago when I was on a strict meal plan with a co-worker, I had lost 19 pounds when the dinner selections were passed around the office for our annual corporate party which was two weeks away. There was nothing on it that I felt comfortable eating, so I requested a special menu. The banquet hall was happy to oblige,

    When the meals were served, my diet buddy and me were eyed funny, and people asked questions. The managing director of the parent company, a hopeless alcoholic who eventually died from a 2-litre-a-day gin habit, stumbled over to us and began to berate us for needing to have "special" dinners. He actually blurted out, "You want to lose weight? Just eat less!"

    I had to be restrained from punching him. I was surprised the words I said to him didn't get me fired. I spent some time in the bathroom crying that evening (mostly fron pure anger), and when I came out to join the party, I was treated like royalty and no one bothered me again about my food choices.

    Years later when I married a man who was a recovering alcoholic (from Scotland, so a man of few words which always pack a punch), people would ask him why he wasn't drinking when we were at parties. His only response was, "Because it would kill me." End of THAT discussion.
  • SconnieCat
    SconnieCat Posts: 770 Member
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    To be honest, most people do not want to see you make it where they have failed. Your success highlights their lack of success, your determination reminds them of every time they tried and gave up because it was too hard.

    Just because they lack self control doesn't mean you should let them influence you. They aren't saying these things to help you out, they are saying them so that they feel better about their own lack of discipline. Subconsciously or not, they are projecting this out on you. Some people will even deliberately try to sabotage your quest for self improvement, even your partner or your family, I *kitten* you not.

    How to respond? It's easy, be assertive, tell them no. Don't let other people distract you from your goal. Ultimately the choice is yours.

    See, I call B.S. on this. I hate how people automatically assume that every comment is about jealousy and inner turmoil. Sometimes people just talk to talk and it has NOTHING to do with their own fitness goals, diet goals or self esteem. I think it's rude and arrogant to assume such and it sets up a "them v. me" dynamic that may not truly be there.

    Sometimes, people just talk to fill up space, to make conversation, to show an interest. It's better to just let it roll off with the attitude that they meant nothing by it, then to get all offended and then, in turn, judge them right back.

    But they are literally telling me I should be doing the opposite from what I am, I would NEVER say that to them because they might be making lesser choices than I am. Good for them, they don't need to lose. I don't know why a department of 70 people would be consistently making the same "conversation topic"

    Because it's civil convention. They aren't telling you want to do really, they are probably trying to be nice. When you say you can't have something because you are on a diet, it's human nature to respond, "Hey - you look great. Treat yourself."

    And it's arrogant and rude to diagnose people by saying they are projecting or lacking self discipline. That's ridiculous.

    I understand it's annoying, but if you think the world is out to get you all the time, then you will drive yourself crazy. I would honestly stop trying to be offended and let it roll off your shoulder.

    Don't need to be offended, just to keep focused on #1 so you don't let other people distract you from your fitness goals.

    Just as people can support you and motivate you to better yourself, a lot of people will always resent your success and a few will try to undermine your effort.

    "You have to remember something: Everybody pities the weak; jealousy you have to earn" - Arnold Schwarzenegger

    I think it's silly to think that everyone is jealous of me. I don't walk around thinking that way - and I'm glad I don't.

    Okay, let me set the record straight. I don't think anyone is jealous of me, and you're not helping by making that assumption. I'm simply trying to get some feedback, because people are constantly making comments about my "rabbit food" and how I don't eat enough. So they ARE scrutinizing it, even if it's not in a negative conotation. Scrutinize means they are analyzing it with crtical attention. It's not that I necessarily mean all these people are trying to thwart my improved lifestyle, and it's not that I think these people are doing it intentionally. And yes, I've overcome an eating disorder so I do have some sort of hypersensitivity to people paying attention to what I eat. But, I also know the number of comments I get are unnecessary from CERTAIN people. Some people are great and are the first ones to let me know that when people bring in doughnuts, they also brought in a variety of fresh fruit. It was simply an idea generator to help me when the people who are being blatant about their assumptions on my lifestyle, and that I do not want to come off rude myself.

    OP, I don't think @PRMinx was necessarily referring to you or thinking that anyone was jealous of you. I think she was responding to the post she quoted.

  • PRMinx
    PRMinx Posts: 4,612 Member
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    To be honest, most people do not want to see you make it where they have failed. Your success highlights their lack of success, your determination reminds them of every time they tried and gave up because it was too hard.

    Just because they lack self control doesn't mean you should let them influence you. They aren't saying these things to help you out, they are saying them so that they feel better about their own lack of discipline. Subconsciously or not, they are projecting this out on you. Some people will even deliberately try to sabotage your quest for self improvement, even your partner or your family, I *kitten* you not.

    How to respond? It's easy, be assertive, tell them no. Don't let other people distract you from your goal. Ultimately the choice is yours.

    See, I call B.S. on this. I hate how people automatically assume that every comment is about jealousy and inner turmoil. Sometimes people just talk to talk and it has NOTHING to do with their own fitness goals, diet goals or self esteem. I think it's rude and arrogant to assume such and it sets up a "them v. me" dynamic that may not truly be there.

    Sometimes, people just talk to fill up space, to make conversation, to show an interest. It's better to just let it roll off with the attitude that they meant nothing by it, then to get all offended and then, in turn, judge them right back.

    But they are literally telling me I should be doing the opposite from what I am, I would NEVER say that to them because they might be making lesser choices than I am. Good for them, they don't need to lose. I don't know why a department of 70 people would be consistently making the same "conversation topic"

    Because it's civil convention. They aren't telling you want to do really, they are probably trying to be nice. When you say you can't have something because you are on a diet, it's human nature to respond, "Hey - you look great. Treat yourself."

    And it's arrogant and rude to diagnose people by saying they are projecting or lacking self discipline. That's ridiculous.

    I understand it's annoying, but if you think the world is out to get you all the time, then you will drive yourself crazy. I would honestly stop trying to be offended and let it roll off your shoulder.

    Don't need to be offended, just to keep focused on #1 so you don't let other people distract you from your fitness goals.

    Just as people can support you and motivate you to better yourself, a lot of people will always resent your success and a few will try to undermine your effort.

    "You have to remember something: Everybody pities the weak; jealousy you have to earn" - Arnold Schwarzenegger

    I think it's silly to think that everyone is jealous of me. I don't walk around thinking that way - and I'm glad I don't.

    Okay, let me set the record straight. I don't think anyone is jealous of me, and you're not helping by making that assumption. I'm simply trying to get some feedback, because people are constantly making comments about my "rabbit food" and how I don't eat enough. So they ARE scrutinizing it, even if it's not in a negative conotation. Scrutinize means they are analyzing it with crtical attention. It's not that I necessarily mean all these people are trying to thwart my improved lifestyle, and it's not that I think these people are doing it intentionally. And yes, I've overcome an eating disorder so I do have some sort of hypersensitivity to people paying attention to what I eat. But, I also know the number of comments I get are unnecessary from CERTAIN people. Some people are great and are the first ones to let me know that when people bring in doughnuts, they also brought in a variety of fresh fruit. It was simply an idea generator to help me when the people who are being blatant about their assumptions on my lifestyle, and that I do not want to come off rude myself.

    I was addressing the other poster.

    My comments to you were simply, don't let it bother you. It's not worth it. Just walk away from the conversation or say, "that's my order."
  • jennifershoo
    jennifershoo Posts: 3,209 Member
    To be honest, most people do not want to see you make it where they have failed. Your success highlights their lack of success, your determination reminds them of every time they tried and gave up because it was too hard.

    Just because they lack self control doesn't mean you should let them influence you. They aren't saying these things to help you out, they are saying them so that they feel better about their own lack of discipline. Subconsciously or not, they are projecting this out on you. Some people will even deliberately try to sabotage your quest for self improvement, even your partner or your family, I *kitten* you not.

    How to respond? It's easy, be assertive, tell them no. Don't let other people distract you from your goal. Ultimately the choice is yours.


    Great post!
  • PRMinx
    PRMinx Posts: 4,612 Member
    SconnieCat wrote: »
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    mcgra263 wrote: »
    PRMinx wrote: »
    To be honest, most people do not want to see you make it where they have failed. Your success highlights their lack of success, your determination reminds them of every time they tried and gave up because it was too hard.

    Just because they lack self control doesn't mean you should let them influence you. They aren't saying these things to help you out, they are saying them so that they feel better about their own lack of discipline. Subconsciously or not, they are projecting this out on you. Some people will even deliberately try to sabotage your quest for self improvement, even your partner or your family, I *kitten* you not.

    How to respond? It's easy, be assertive, tell them no. Don't let other people distract you from your goal. Ultimately the choice is yours.

    See, I call B.S. on this. I hate how people automatically assume that every comment is about jealousy and inner turmoil. Sometimes people just talk to talk and it has NOTHING to do with their own fitness goals, diet goals or self esteem. I think it's rude and arrogant to assume such and it sets up a "them v. me" dynamic that may not truly be there.

    Sometimes, people just talk to fill up space, to make conversation, to show an interest. It's better to just let it roll off with the attitude that they meant nothing by it, then to get all offended and then, in turn, judge them right back.

    But they are literally telling me I should be doing the opposite from what I am, I would NEVER say that to them because they might be making lesser choices than I am. Good for them, they don't need to lose. I don't know why a department of 70 people would be consistently making the same "conversation topic"

    Because it's civil convention. They aren't telling you want to do really, they are probably trying to be nice. When you say you can't have something because you are on a diet, it's human nature to respond, "Hey - you look great. Treat yourself."

    And it's arrogant and rude to diagnose people by saying they are projecting or lacking self discipline. That's ridiculous.

    I understand it's annoying, but if you think the world is out to get you all the time, then you will drive yourself crazy. I would honestly stop trying to be offended and let it roll off your shoulder.

    Don't need to be offended, just to keep focused on #1 so you don't let other people distract you from your fitness goals.

    Just as people can support you and motivate you to better yourself, a lot of people will always resent your success and a few will try to undermine your effort.

    "You have to remember something: Everybody pities the weak; jealousy you have to earn" - Arnold Schwarzenegger

    I think it's silly to think that everyone is jealous of me. I don't walk around thinking that way - and I'm glad I don't.

    Okay, let me set the record straight. I don't think anyone is jealous of me, and you're not helping by making that assumption. I'm simply trying to get some feedback, because people are constantly making comments about my "rabbit food" and how I don't eat enough. So they ARE scrutinizing it, even if it's not in a negative conotation. Scrutinize means they are analyzing it with crtical attention. It's not that I necessarily mean all these people are trying to thwart my improved lifestyle, and it's not that I think these people are doing it intentionally. And yes, I've overcome an eating disorder so I do have some sort of hypersensitivity to people paying attention to what I eat. But, I also know the number of comments I get are unnecessary from CERTAIN people. Some people are great and are the first ones to let me know that when people bring in doughnuts, they also brought in a variety of fresh fruit. It was simply an idea generator to help me when the people who are being blatant about their assumptions on my lifestyle, and that I do not want to come off rude myself.

    OP, I don't think @PRMinx was necessarily referring to you or thinking that anyone was jealous of you. I think she was responding to the post she quoted.

    Thank you. <3