Tips on losing weight without serious exercise?

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Replies

  • brentopia
    brentopia Posts: 113 Member
    The only thing you need to do to lose weight is to accurately burn more calories than you consume. Exercise is not required. Even so - you should consider some form of exercise for your health. Just walking is wonderful exercise, especially if regularly scheduled. Also, if you can do even a minimum of some type of resistance exercise such as dumbbells, or using your own body weight, you'll reduce your loss of muscle - while losing fat. Keep what muscle you can while losing weight! You'll be glad you did. Good luck on your journey.
  • WinoGelato
    WinoGelato Posts: 13,455 Member
    kailakrush wrote: »
    Kruggeri wrote: »
    kailakrush wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    kailakrush wrote: »
    Anyone have any advice or a plan they follow or recommend?

    Thanks!

    Exercise is not a requirement for weight loss, however, it does speed up the process. I eat at about a 300 calorie deficit, but I do have a cheat meal on Fridays. My cheat meal is usually carb loaded, although sometimes it can be a ridiculous amount of protein. I do calisthenics at home. I also walk 3 miles on Tuesdays and Thursdays. My muscles are getting tighter and more defined, which in turn makes me look more fit.

    Yes, you can eat whatever you want as long as you stay within your calories, but let's be honest. Do you think you're going to lose weight faster eating clean or eating fast food? Cut out your processed food and you'll lose weight faster and you'll feel a ton better too.

    calorie deficit is calorie deficit. Does not matter if you eat "clean" (whatever that is), or if you eat fast food. The fact that you think there is a difference is ridiculous.

    what are you defining as processed?

    Clean eating is a deceptively simple concept. Rather than revolving around the idea of ingesting more or less of specific things (for instance, fewer calories or more protein), the idea is more about being mindful of the food's pathway between its origin and your plate. At its simplest, clean eating is about eating whole foods, or "real" foods — those that are un- or minimally processed, refined, and handled, making them as close to their natural form as possible. However, modern food production has become so sophisticated that simply eating whole foods can be a challenging proposition these days.

    TL;DR: Clean eating is not stuff in a box, can, etc.

    You are absolutely right: calorie deficit is calorie deficit. But think about this situation:

    Breakfast Option A: Egg McMuffin from McDonald's. 300 calories (the sandwich alone)
    Breakfast Option B: One large naval orange, one vanilla greek yogurt, one hard boiled egg white, one cup of coffee with 1 tbsp of Italian Sweet Creme creamer. 257 calories.


    Think about the nutritional value each of these options offers.

    An Egg McMuffin and greek yogurt both offer the same amount of protein.
    Greek yogurt contains 0g of fat, <5mg of cholesterol, 15g of carbs, and 65mg of sodium.
    An Egg McMuffin contains 13g of fat, 260mg of cholesterol, 31g of carbs, and 750g of sodium.
    (I'm sure you noticed some of these in the nutrition tracker in MyFitnessPal. There's a reason they're there)

    Looking past the nutritional value and looking solely at the quantity of food, which option do you think will keep the person fuller longer? Keep in mind that the yogurt has the same protein as the single Egg McMuffin and protein is proven to "curb hunger" (which is why people with healthy diets snack on things like nuts). Option B also has the egg white and an entire large orange to top it off.

    Now think about someone who isn't in the habit of calorie counting. Think about someone who isn't used to portion sizes or limiting how much they're allowed to eat for an entire day. Typically, if they don't eat to their normal capacity (meaning let's say they're normally used to eating an Egg McMuffin with 2 hashbrowns and a large cola, as opposed to the one Egg McMuffin sandwich), they're going to feel hungry. This is why you hear a lot of new dieters say they always feel hungry. I'm sure you can imagine what happens next.

    Eating clean isn't easy for everyone. Just one month ago my fridge was constantly empty, aside from soda. Everything was in cans/boxes or delivered from a restaurant or picked up at a fast food place. I was just too lazy to grocery shop or cook for myself. Now I actually enjoy cooking. I enjoy picking out my fruit for the week and the veggies to cook with my steaks or chicken breasts or ahi tuna steaks. I don't feel as lethargic all the time (because I don't have all that extra junk that's in processed foods in my body), which means I have more energy and motivation to actually exercise. It's hard to get into it, but I promise it is worth it.

    To anyone reading this, don't knock it before you try it. Just try it for a few weeks and be true to it. Don't think you have to starve yourself or eat steamed carrots for every meal, because you don't. I eat roughly 1,300-1,500 a day, but I always exercise to have at least a 150 calorie deficit. I have one cheat meal a week. Through out the week, I do eat chocolates and sweets (I have a terrrrrible sweet tooth). I just make sure I don't take up 50% of my calories for sweets.

    TL;DR: Calories in and calories out. It's a tad more complicated than that.

    I am confused. Is one of your scenarios supposed to be a clean scenario and one supposed to be an unclean/dirty/processed scenario? Which one is which?



    I can tell you're being just a little snarky here, but the top part explaining what "clean eating" is, came from here: http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/weight-loss/plans/diets/clean-eating/

    So whatever type of tone you got from that isn't mine.

    Actually, I have relatively little issue with the top part of your post with the attempt to define the vague, nebulous term "clean eating". I actually respected the attempt to put some parameters around the term, because it means something different to every person. I'm not surprised to see that it came from a Fitness magazine post, and it actually isn't a terrible definition.

    The irony is that my issue with the term "clean eating" is that it means something different to every person, and the rest of your post is the most perfect example of that ever. You posted two scenarios, which you obviously thought very clearly articulated your point, when in fact, your second example is probably less clean than the first by the definition "things that don't come in a package".

    In fact, the issue that I have with the "tone" of your post isn't the definition of clean eating, or the scenarios with their nutritional breakdowns. It is the assumption that the "clean" way is so obviously superior than any other way, that you scoff at me, and others when asking to clarify the difference between your scenarios. I have no issue with people choosing to eat however they choose. I choose to eat a wide variety of foods, some more processed than others. Ironically, my normal breakfast is a greek yogurt and a coffee with Italian Sweet Creme creamer, that's one of my favorite flavors of CoffeeMate (besides the limited edition Girl Scout Samoas Flavor). What I do have issue with is the holier than though attitude of "clean" eaters that their way is the one true way, when in fact, often their choices are fairly similar to mine.



  • maillemaker
    maillemaker Posts: 1,253 Member
    I am losing weight and I do not exercise. Now that the community pool has opened up I have started taking the kids swimming so I will be getting some exercise in.

    But all of this was through diet alone. Ignore everything prior to 2/28 (new scale).

    f7K6a5h.png
  • SezxyStef
    SezxyStef Posts: 15,268 Member
    I just lost most of my weight with a deficit calculated by MFP, until I lost 15 kgs. For the last 5, I realised I needed to add exercise and pay closer attention to my macros (less fat, more protein) in order to keep losing and hitting that goal weight.


    This is what I have been noticing too. The lower your target weight based on BMI/BF the longer and harder it can be to get there so exercise can help you create the deficit you need as your allowed calories drop.

    Yes exactly! The lower it gets, you also realise those extra 100/150 cals a day start making much more of a difference then before. First, if I was slacking a little bit, I'd still keep losing (although a little less). Now it stalls immediately or I gain!

    You are suppose to eat exercise calories back....

    and fat is a good thing

    deficit comes from logging accurately.
  • tdatsenko
    tdatsenko Posts: 155 Member
    kailakrush wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    kailakrush wrote: »
    Anyone have any advice or a plan they follow or recommend?

    Thanks!

    Exercise is not a requirement for weight loss, however, it does speed up the process. I eat at about a 300 calorie deficit, but I do have a cheat meal on Fridays. My cheat meal is usually carb loaded, although sometimes it can be a ridiculous amount of protein. I do calisthenics at home. I also walk 3 miles on Tuesdays and Thursdays. My muscles are getting tighter and more defined, which in turn makes me look more fit.

    Yes, you can eat whatever you want as long as you stay within your calories, but let's be honest. Do you think you're going to lose weight faster eating clean or eating fast food? Cut out your processed food and you'll lose weight faster and you'll feel a ton better too.

    calorie deficit is calorie deficit. Does not matter if you eat "clean" (whatever that is), or if you eat fast food. The fact that you think there is a difference is ridiculous.

    what are you defining as processed?

    Clean eating is a deceptively simple concept. Rather than revolving around the idea of ingesting more or less of specific things (for instance, fewer calories or more protein), the idea is more about being mindful of the food's pathway between its origin and your plate. At its simplest, clean eating is about eating whole foods, or "real" foods — those that are un- or minimally processed, refined, and handled, making them as close to their natural form as possible. However, modern food production has become so sophisticated that simply eating whole foods can be a challenging proposition these days.

    TL;DR: Clean eating is not stuff in a box, can, etc.

    You are absolutely right: calorie deficit is calorie deficit. But think about this situation:

    Breakfast Option A: Egg McMuffin from McDonald's. 300 calories (the sandwich alone)
    Breakfast Option B: One large naval orange, one vanilla greek yogurt, one hard boiled egg white, one cup of coffee with 1 tbsp of Italian Sweet Creme creamer. 257 calories.


    Think about the nutritional value each of these options offers.

    An Egg McMuffin and greek yogurt both offer the same amount of protein.
    Greek yogurt contains 0g of fat, <5mg of cholesterol, 15g of carbs, and 65mg of sodium.
    An Egg McMuffin contains 13g of fat, 260mg of cholesterol, 31g of carbs, and 750g of sodium.
    (I'm sure you noticed some of these in the nutrition tracker in MyFitnessPal. There's a reason they're there)

    Looking past the nutritional value and looking solely at the quantity of food, which option do you think will keep the person fuller longer? Keep in mind that the yogurt has the same protein as the single Egg McMuffin and protein is proven to "curb hunger" (which is why people with healthy diets snack on things like nuts). Option B also has the egg white and an entire large orange to top it off.

    Now think about someone who isn't in the habit of calorie counting. Think about someone who isn't used to portion sizes or limiting how much they're allowed to eat for an entire day. Typically, if they don't eat to their normal capacity (meaning let's say they're normally used to eating an Egg McMuffin with 2 hashbrowns and a large cola, as opposed to the one Egg McMuffin sandwich), they're going to feel hungry. This is why you hear a lot of new dieters say they always feel hungry. I'm sure you can imagine what happens next.

    Eating clean isn't easy for everyone. Just one month ago my fridge was constantly empty, aside from soda. Everything was in cans/boxes or delivered from a restaurant or picked up at a fast food place. I was just too lazy to grocery shop or cook for myself. Now I actually enjoy cooking. I enjoy picking out my fruit for the week and the veggies to cook with my steaks or chicken breasts or ahi tuna steaks. I don't feel as lethargic all the time (because I don't have all that extra junk that's in processed foods in my body), which means I have more energy and motivation to actually exercise. It's hard to get into it, but I promise it is worth it.

    To anyone reading this, don't knock it before you try it. Just try it for a few weeks and be true to it. Don't think you have to starve yourself or eat steamed carrots for every meal, because you don't. I eat roughly 1,300-1,500 a day, but I always exercise to have at least a 150 calorie deficit. I have one cheat meal a week. Through out the week, I do eat chocolates and sweets (I have a terrrrrible sweet tooth). I just make sure I don't take up 50% of my calories for sweets.

    TL;DR: Calories in and calories out. It's a tad more complicated than that.

    After reading that, I know one thing for certain. I really want an Egg McMuffin now.

    Make sure to scrub it down with bleach so you can eat clean.

  • PeachyCarol
    PeachyCarol Posts: 8,029 Member
    edited May 2015
    Y'all, I've been eating gelato almost every day for a month now, and I've lost 5 pounds.

    That means it's the best way to lose weight. You should totally do this.
  • Azexas
    Azexas Posts: 4,334 Member
    Y'all, I've been eating gelato almost every day for a month now too, and I've lost 5 pounds.

    That means it's the best way to lose weight. You should totally do this.

    This is a diet I can get behind!

    But on topic: to lose weight you should be in a calorie deficit. How you get there is up to you. If you don't want to exercise, you don't have to.
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,139 Member
    kailakrush wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    kailakrush wrote: »
    Anyone have any advice or a plan they follow or recommend?

    Thanks!

    Exercise is not a requirement for weight loss, however, it does speed up the process. I eat at about a 300 calorie deficit, but I do have a cheat meal on Fridays. My cheat meal is usually carb loaded, although sometimes it can be a ridiculous amount of protein. I do calisthenics at home. I also walk 3 miles on Tuesdays and Thursdays. My muscles are getting tighter and more defined, which in turn makes me look more fit.

    Yes, you can eat whatever you want as long as you stay within your calories, but let's be honest. Do you think you're going to lose weight faster eating clean or eating fast food? Cut out your processed food and you'll lose weight faster and you'll feel a ton better too.

    calorie deficit is calorie deficit. Does not matter if you eat "clean" (whatever that is), or if you eat fast food. The fact that you think there is a difference is ridiculous.

    what are you defining as processed?

    Clean eating is a deceptively simple concept. Rather than revolving around the idea of ingesting more or less of specific things (for instance, fewer calories or more protein), the idea is more about being mindful of the food's pathway between its origin and your plate. At its simplest, clean eating is about eating whole foods, or "real" foods — those that are un- or minimally processed, refined, and handled, making them as close to their natural form as possible. However, modern food production has become so sophisticated that simply eating whole foods can be a challenging proposition these days.

    TL;DR: Clean eating is not stuff in a box, can, etc.

    You are absolutely right: calorie deficit is calorie deficit. But think about this situation:

    Breakfast Option A: Egg McMuffin from McDonald's. 300 calories (the sandwich alone)
    Breakfast Option B: One large naval orange, one vanilla greek yogurt, one hard boiled egg white, one cup of coffee with 1 tbsp of Italian Sweet Creme creamer. 257 calories.


    Think about the nutritional value each of these options offers.

    An Egg McMuffin and greek yogurt both offer the same amount of protein.
    Greek yogurt contains 0g of fat, <5mg of cholesterol, 15g of carbs, and 65mg of sodium.
    An Egg McMuffin contains 13g of fat, 260mg of cholesterol, 31g of carbs, and 750g of sodium.
    (I'm sure you noticed some of these in the nutrition tracker in MyFitnessPal. There's a reason they're there)

    Looking past the nutritional value and looking solely at the quantity of food, which option do you think will keep the person fuller longer? Keep in mind that the yogurt has the same protein as the single Egg McMuffin and protein is proven to "curb hunger" (which is why people with healthy diets snack on things like nuts). Option B also has the egg white and an entire large orange to top it off.

    Now think about someone who isn't in the habit of calorie counting. Think about someone who isn't used to portion sizes or limiting how much they're allowed to eat for an entire day. Typically, if they don't eat to their normal capacity (meaning let's say they're normally used to eating an Egg McMuffin with 2 hashbrowns and a large cola, as opposed to the one Egg McMuffin sandwich), they're going to feel hungry. This is why you hear a lot of new dieters say they always feel hungry. I'm sure you can imagine what happens next.

    Eating clean isn't easy for everyone. Just one month ago my fridge was constantly empty, aside from soda. Everything was in cans/boxes or delivered from a restaurant or picked up at a fast food place. I was just too lazy to grocery shop or cook for myself. Now I actually enjoy cooking. I enjoy picking out my fruit for the week and the veggies to cook with my steaks or chicken breasts or ahi tuna steaks. I don't feel as lethargic all the time (because I don't have all that extra junk that's in processed foods in my body), which means I have more energy and motivation to actually exercise. It's hard to get into it, but I promise it is worth it.

    To anyone reading this, don't knock it before you try it. Just try it for a few weeks and be true to it. Don't think you have to starve yourself or eat steamed carrots for every meal, because you don't. I eat roughly 1,300-1,500 a day, but I always exercise to have at least a 150 calorie deficit. I have one cheat meal a week. Through out the week, I do eat chocolates and sweets (I have a terrrrrible sweet tooth). I just make sure I don't take up 50% of my calories for sweets.

    TL;DR: Calories in and calories out. It's a tad more complicated than that.

    lets review and make this simple.

    100 calories of donuts = 100 calories of carrots from an energy standpoint.

    However, 100 calories of donuts is not the nutritional equivalent of 100 calories of carrots, and no one is arguing that they are.

    What matters is the context of the overall diet and that one is hitting their micros/macros/calorie targets.

    So if my day consists of a 200 calorie donut and 200 calories of carrots, and I fill the ret in with mainly nutrient dense foods and hit my micros/macros what difference would it make if 200 calories comes from donuts and say another 300 calories is from processed food?? Does the 500 calories of donuts and processed food make my day bad, even though I hit micros/macros/calorie target?

    and your example is not a valid one, because you do not take into account the hypothetical persons entire diet. you are assuming that he choice is either 300 calories of egg mcmuffins or 300 calories of "clean" food...assuming a 1500 calorie diet, what about the other 1200 calories?

  • NewMeSM75
    NewMeSM75 Posts: 971 Member

    lets review and make this simple.

    100 calories of donuts = 100 calories of carrots from an energy standpoint.

    However, 100 calories of donuts is not the nutritional equivalent of 100 calories of carrots, and no one is arguing that they are.

    What matters is the context of the overall diet and that one is hitting their micros/macros/calorie targets.

    So if my day consists of a 200 calorie donut and 200 calories of carrots, and I fill the ret in with mainly nutrient dense foods and hit my micros/macros what difference would it make if 200 calories comes from donuts and say another 300 calories is from processed food?? Does the 500 calories of donuts and processed food make my day bad, even though I hit micros/macros/calorie target?

    and your example is not a valid one, because you do not take into account the hypothetical persons entire diet. you are assuming that he choice is either 300 calories of egg mcmuffins or 300 calories of "clean" food...assuming a 1500 calorie diet, what about the other 1200 calories?

    Said perfectly!
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,139 Member
    ceoverturf wrote: »
    In what world is Greek Yogurt not processed?

    Unless there are yogurt trees out there of which I'm unaware.

    in the world of clean eating...
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,139 Member
    Y'all, I've been eating gelato almost every day for a month now, and I've lost 5 pounds.

    That means it's the best way to lose weight. You should totally do this.

    I eat ice cream or gelato every day and I am down about 8 pounds on this cut ...
  • Emilia777
    Emilia777 Posts: 978 Member
    edited May 2015
    kailakrush wrote: »

    Breakfast Option A: Egg McMuffin from McDonald's. 300 calories (the sandwich alone)
    Breakfast Option B: One large naval orange, one vanilla greek yogurt, one hard boiled egg white, one cup of coffee with 1 tbsp of Italian Sweet Creme creamer. 257 calories.


    Think about the nutritional value each of these options offers.

    An Egg McMuffin and greek yogurt both offer the same amount of protein.
    Greek yogurt contains 0g of fat, <5mg of cholesterol, 15g of carbs, and 65mg of sodium.
    An Egg McMuffin contains 13g of fat, 260mg of cholesterol, 31g of carbs, and 750g of sodium.
    (I'm sure you noticed some of these in the nutrition tracker in MyFitnessPal. There's a reason they're there)

    You lost me at egg white. Yolks are tasty. Also not a big fan of fruit. Finally, even if I subscribed to the whole clean eating thing, I’m not sure how flavoured packaged yogurt is supposed to be somehow superior to a freshly cracked egg on an english muffin. AND you have cheat meals? Why not just eat all the foods normally, while hitting your macros? The philosophy you put forth is very inconsistent and I am puzzled.

    And now I want a McMuffin.
  • jessilee119
    jessilee119 Posts: 444 Member
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    penny0919 wrote: »
    Actually if you are overweight/obese it is perfectly acceptable by medical standards to not gain ANY weight while pregnant. (meaning you are losing body weight while gaining baby/etc weight). The baby takes from the woman's extra nutrient stores if you are not eating the excess 300 calories.

    My OB told me not to eat any different (i.e., more) when I became pregnant (at about 25 BMI). I wish I would've listened to her, I gained 40 lbs :(

    2 lbs at 5 months is perfectly fine if this poster is overweight/obese. It would be concerning if she is under/average weight.

    Anything I have read/research does not agree with the bolded statement. Even overweight women should gain weight during pregnancy but less.

    Obese women as well...but again not as much. I just had an obese friend give birth and her doctor monitored her weight to ensure she was gaining appropriately...10-15lbs to account for baby, increase blood, larger uterus, placenta, amniotic fluid etc. She did but when she left the hospital she weighed less than when she got pregnant...

    I had lost some weight before I became pregnant but was still obese and the doctor still wanted to see me gain 20 pounds.

    Realistically, though, I would hope that the poster is going for regular checkups and if it was an issue that the doctor would mention something and the poster would follow the doctor's advice.

  • rak173
    rak173 Posts: 105 Member
    I do not do any extra exercising and have managed to lose weight. I do do a lot of walking in my regular day, averaging 10,000 steps/day. This lets me eat more than if I only walked 4,000 steps. I do like this, because I do not feel quite a restricted with my diet, as it adds a decent number of calories. This allows me an extra snack at night or a heavier dinner and I can still come in under my calorie goal. I do hope to add more light activity to my routine, because it does make me feel better.