PCOS, Pregnant and Terrified of Gaining Weight

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Replies

  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,262 Member
    I'm not convinced of the claim that she gains weight eating more than 1000 calories. Her food diary is sporadic at best and on the days when she does log (mid April) she's more in the 1300 calorie range.
  • kamakazeekim
    kamakazeekim Posts: 1,183 Member
    edited July 2015
    Yep I was in the 1300 calorie range while trying to get pregnant because my doctor thought I was eating too little to ovulate. I gained weight eating the 1300 calories (although it was a very slow gain) My doctor does know about my WLS and that I struggle to eat more than 1300 calories (when trying to get pregnant I was supposed to be eating at least 1600 calories) which is why they want me to to drink ensure or other such calorie dense nutrition drinks. I'm 5'3 and 127 pounds. After having my 2nd baby and doing everything EXACTLY as I was told to do I was 263 pounds. No doctor or dietitian could tell me why I gained such an outrageous amount so fast so they assumed I was lying about what I ate and how much I worked out. That's why I got the WLS. After the WLS I continued to not lose weight. I saw yet another endocrinologist who put me on metformin at the maximum dose and I finally for the first time in my life lost weight as long as I kept my calories at 1000 or less and my carbs low.
  • Sued0nim
    Sued0nim Posts: 17,456 Member


    TDEEs don't work like that - they are relatively bespoke to the individual
    jemhh wrote: »
    First, this is the study that you are talking about. Note the following:
    RESULT(S): Adjusted BMR was 1,868 +/- 41 kcal/day in the control group, 1,445.57 +/- 76 in all PCOS women, 1,590 +/- 130 in PCOS women without IR and 1,116 +/- 106 in PCOS women with IR. Adjusted BMR showed a statistically significant difference between women with PCOS and control subjects, with lowest values in the group of PCOS women with IR, even after adjusting all groups for age and BMI.

    They are talking about BMR, not TDEE. Eating 2000 calories per day doesn't mean that you are eating 555 calories over your total caloric needs. It would mean that you are eating 555 calories more than needed for the average PCOS woman (in that study) to be alive and in a coma, doing nothing all day long.

    Second, you have lost a lot of weight so I am guessing that you have a good idea of the number of calories needed to maintain that weight. Have you discussed your current calorie level with your doctor and did s/he base the recommendation of 2000 calories on that?

    this ^^^
  • Sued0nim
    Sued0nim Posts: 17,456 Member
    newer research doesn't necessarily equal better. my last OB was over 70 years old and had been delivering babies since he was in his 20's. he even used a fetascope instead of a modern electronic version to listen to baby's heartbeat. just because something is new doesn't mean it is better. and if the OP goes into the dr's office and gives the dr every single bit of information she has about herself, then that is just all the more the dr should be trusted. i didn't read anything in the OP that said what the dr was advising "didn't make sense." i think what makes even less sense is coming onto a public forum and listening to a bunch of strangers when it comes to the health of your unborn child.

    You had a 70 year old doctor who didn't keep up with the latest medical knowledge and used outdated equipment which is their duty, and you are proud of that?

    I am so imagining a Pinard Horn here :bigsmile:
  • Ninkyou
    Ninkyou Posts: 6,666 Member
    edited July 2015
    Yep I was in the 1300 calorie range while trying to get pregnant because my doctor thought I was eating too little to ovulate. I gained weight eating the 1300 calories (although it was a very slow gain) My doctor does know about my WLS and that I struggle to eat more than 1300 calories (when trying to get pregnant I was supposed to be eating at least 1600 calories) which is why they want me to to drink ensure or other such calorie dense nutrition drinks. I'm 5'3 and 127 pounds. After having my 2nd baby and doing everything EXACTLY as I was told to do I was 263 pounds. No doctor or dietitian could tell me why I gained such an outrageous amount so fast so they assumed I was lying about what I ate and how much I worked out. That's why I got the WLS. After the WLS I continued to not lose weight. I saw yet another endocrinologist who put me on metformin at the maximum dose and I finally for the first time in my life lost weight as long as I kept my calories at 1000 or less and my carbs low.

    IMO you should be listening to your doctor. He/she knows your situation. Pregnancy is not the time to skimp on calories. Of course that doesn't mean you have to "eat for two" or go out of control. It does mean, however, that you need to provide YOUR body and your BABY adequate nutrition. It's not just about you and your weight loss anymore.

    I lost 57 lbs before I got pregnant with my baby. I was concerned about weight gain too. I logged everything I ate. If I went over, I went over. But I still had that accountability and I didn't really go over all that often. I'm 5'2 and was 155 prepregnancy. I started somewhere around 1700-1800 calories in my first trimester and ended somewhere around 2200-2400 in my third. I gained my recommended amount according to my BMI, which was 25 lbs. I gained 24.6 lbs, lol. 2000 calories seems like it's just been streamlined by your doctor to shoot for for your entire pregnancy, rather than adding throughout the trimesters. That's my interpretation at least. Which is actually pretty reasonable.

    So yeah, I think you should listen to your doctor. Maybe start logging consistently on MFP too. You can always ask your OB to refer you to a dietician that specializes in pregnancy nutrition. But stay where you are, 1000-1300 calories (especially when you were specifically told to eat 1600) isn't what you should do.

    Relax about the weight gain. It's going to happen, whether you will it to or not. Remember that you can always lose weight after baby. But right now, there are more important things than some perceived attachment to keeping your numbers low or whatever.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,262 Member
    Why not eat at the caloric level recommended by the medical professional who knows your case and then, if you suddenly "blow up like a freakin balloon" eat a bit less? You will not literally gain 5 or 10 or 20 pounds overnight if you are paying attention to the scale and how your clothes fit. You're not going to eat 2000 calories today, go to bed, and wake up 200 pounds in the morning.
  • busyPK
    busyPK Posts: 3,788 Member
    Congrats on the pregnancy! I've had 3 kids and my only advise is to listen to your body. Eat when you are hungry, stay hydrated and don't put so much value on the number listed on the scale. If it affects you so much, then turn around when they weigh you and ask them to not tell you. You are growing a baby!! If you were able to lose weight in the past then you can do it again once you delivery and recover. :)
  • kamakazeekim
    kamakazeekim Posts: 1,183 Member
    jemhh wrote: »
    Why not eat at the caloric level recommended by the medical professional who knows your case and then, if you suddenly "blow up like a freakin balloon" eat a bit less? You will not literally gain 5 or 10 or 20 pounds overnight if you are paying attention to the scale and how your clothes fit. You're not going to eat 2000 calories today, go to bed, and wake up 200 pounds in the morning.

    I do gain weight crazy fast though! I was out of refills on my medication and it took almost 3 weeks to get a new prescription and in that time I gained almost 12 pounds. My eating did not change at all during that time.
  • Ninkyou
    Ninkyou Posts: 6,666 Member
    jemhh wrote: »
    Why not eat at the caloric level recommended by the medical professional who knows your case and then, if you suddenly "blow up like a freakin balloon" eat a bit less? You will not literally gain 5 or 10 or 20 pounds overnight if you are paying attention to the scale and how your clothes fit. You're not going to eat 2000 calories today, go to bed, and wake up 200 pounds in the morning.

    I do gain weight crazy fast though! I was out of refills on my medication and it took almost 3 weeks to get a new prescription and in that time I gained almost 12 pounds. My eating did not change at all during that time.

    I'm really skeptical of this, to be honest. Mathematically and scientifically that makes no sense. You would have had to eaten about 42,000 extra calories over what you need to maintain to gain 12 lbs. Yet your eating didn't change. That's literally not possible.

    To be honest, I feel like there's a lot of inconsistency going on here. You haven't logged since late April, and even that was inconsistent. I see you also do not weigh your food, so I suspect you are actually eating more calories than you think. But even that would not account for an extra 42,000 calories. Do you understand what I'm getting at here?

    Your (non-pregnancy) gains are probably a mixture water, hormones and inaccurate calorie intake. You did not just magically gain 12 lbs.

    Your pregnancy gains are going to be baby, placenta, blood, maternal fat stores, milk production, water, hormones, etc. Your gains should be pretty consistent with a few large upshoots from "growth spurts".

    Seriously, stop freaking out about weight gain. It's going to happen. You can keep it in check though by logging consistently and accurately.
    Also, eat more than 1000 calories. How do you expect to grow a baby with that? You can't. I'm assuming you worked hard to even get pregnant, so why would you risk your pregnancy and baby by ignoring your doctor's advice and only eating 1000 calories? Do you think 1000 or even 1300 calories is enough to grow a healthy baby? Because it's not.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,262 Member
    jemhh wrote: »
    Why not eat at the caloric level recommended by the medical professional who knows your case and then, if you suddenly "blow up like a freakin balloon" eat a bit less? You will not literally gain 5 or 10 or 20 pounds overnight if you are paying attention to the scale and how your clothes fit. You're not going to eat 2000 calories today, go to bed, and wake up 200 pounds in the morning.

    I do gain weight crazy fast though! I was out of refills on my medication and it took almost 3 weeks to get a new prescription and in that time I gained almost 12 pounds. My eating did not change at all during that time.

    Unless your medication is something that causes you to pass food without any nutrient absorption, I don't believe you. Your incomplete diary and your blog seem very off to me.
  • kamakazeekim
    kamakazeekim Posts: 1,183 Member
    edited July 2015
    Ninkyou wrote: »
    jemhh wrote: »
    Why not eat at the caloric level recommended by the medical professional who knows your case and then, if you suddenly "blow up like a freakin balloon" eat a bit less? You will not literally gain 5 or 10 or 20 pounds overnight if you are paying attention to the scale and how your clothes fit. You're not going to eat 2000 calories today, go to bed, and wake up 200 pounds in the morning.

    I do gain weight crazy fast though! I was out of refills on my medication and it took almost 3 weeks to get a new prescription and in that time I gained almost 12 pounds. My eating did not change at all during that time.

    I'm really skeptical of this, to be honest. Mathematically and scientifically that makes no sense. You would have had to eaten about 42,000 extra calories over what you need to maintain to gain 12 lbs. Yet your eating didn't change. That's literally not possible.

    To be honest, I feel like there's a lot of inconsistency going on here. You haven't logged since late April, and even that was inconsistent. I see you also do not weigh your food, so I suspect you are actually eating more calories than you think. But even that would not account for an extra 42,000 calories. Do you understand what I'm getting at here?

    Your (non-pregnancy) gains are probably a mixture water, hormones and inaccurate calorie intake. You did not just magically gain 12 lbs.

    Your pregnancy gains are going to be baby, placenta, blood, maternal fat stores, milk production, water, hormones, etc. Your gains should be pretty consistent with a few large upshoots from "growth spurts".

    Seriously, stop freaking out about weight gain. It's going to happen. You can keep it in check though by logging consistently and accurately.
    Also, eat more than 1000 calories. How do you expect to grow a baby with that? You can't. I'm assuming you worked hard to even get pregnant, so why would you risk your pregnancy and baby by ignoring your doctor's advice and only eating 1000 calories? Do you think 1000 or even 1300 calories is enough to grow a healthy baby? Because it's not.

    My stomach is 80% smaller than the typical adult. I physically cannot overeat. My sporadic logging was to show my husband that I was eating the way my doctor told me to. Overeating is not the issue. For the past 2 months I have lived on fruits and veggies...mostly watermelon, cantaloupe, pea pods, broccoli and asparagus. Meat, dairy and bread/pasta make me violently ill so I just don't eat it. I vastly overestimate my intake...I log what goes my plate, not what I actually eat. I tend to throw up several times a day since having WLS which is unrelated to eating...doctor says I just have a very irritated stomach. Since getting pregnant I throw up nonstop all day long. I've thrown up 4 times already today and it's only 11:00 am. I guess Zofran is no longer an option so I'm just going to have to suffer through it and hope it doesn't last all 9 months like with my other 2 pregnancies.

  • Ninkyou
    Ninkyou Posts: 6,666 Member

    My stomach is 80% smaller than the typical adult. I physically cannot overeat. My sporadic logging was to show my husband that I was eating the way my doctor told me to. Overeating is not the issue. For the past 2 months I have lived on fruits and veggies...mostly watermelon, cantaloupe, pea pods, broccoli and asparagus. Meat, dairy and bread/pasta make me violently ill so I just don't eat it. I vastly overestimate my intake...I log what goes my plate, not what I actually eat. I tend to throw up several times a day since having WLS which is unrelated to eating...doctor says I just have a very irritated stomach. Since getting pregnant I throw up nonstop all day long. I've thrown up 4 times already today and it's only 11:00 am. I guess Zofran is no longer an option so I'm just going to have to suffer through it and hope it doesn't last all 9 months like with my other 2 pregnancies.

    It's not the physical quantity of food that is "overeating". It's the caloric content that counts. You gain weight from calories.

    That's why I said you'd had have to have eaten 42,000 extra calories. It's calories. Not quantity.