Why gastric bypass if calorie deficit works?

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Replies

  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    I'm not lazy, I don't have blinders on, I was not affected by peer pressure, and it was not easy to qualify. I just passed my one year anniversary from surgery and I am being transitioned out of the program. My spot will go to someone else on the long waiting list.

    My reasons are my own and frankly from all the speculations offered here, I'm in no mood to explain my reasons.
  • QueenKristine77
    QueenKristine77 Posts: 67 Member
    dwalt15110 wrote: »
    Before you can have gastric bypass, you have to prove you can lose weight. My friend lost 75 pounds on his own and then had gastric bypass, because he wanted to lose weight the right way. After that he lost 25 pounds. He gained every bit of that back and a few more pounds. He had it done 4 years ago and is seriously thinking about doing it again. No matter if you're doing it on your own or with surgery or other medical aids, you still have to be committed to the process. It's not magic.

    I agree with this ^^ Surgery doesn't teach you how to eat healthy, watch your portions or even how to live a healthy/active lifestyle AFTER the surgery. You still have to learn that on your own. To me, unless you're DYING, you should have to do it the old fashioned way, cals in, cals out.

  • girlviernes
    girlviernes Posts: 2,402 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I'm not lazy, I don't have blinders on, I was not affected by peer pressure, and it was not easy to qualify. I just passed my one year anniversary from surgery and I am being transitioned out of the program. My spot will go to someone else on the long waiting list.

    My reasons are my own and frankly from all the speculations offered here, I'm in no mood to explain my reasons.

    I didn't mean to be offensive, there is a lot of variability in people who have surgery and the truth is that it is a logical choice for many people due to the numbers. But, I also regularly see people who I think would likely be better off without the surgery but by the time they see me, I don't think they are in a place to really hear that feedback.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    I agree it is a momentous decision. In the months on the waiting list I pondered what my life might be like if I went for surgery. I would have taken a rejection by the weight loss team very personally (yet another failure), and indeed some of my compatriots who were turned down for the surgery option were devastated. I don't think that is an exaggeration.

    I believe I might have been able to lose thirty pounds and maintain that loss on my own.
  • coreyreichle
    coreyreichle Posts: 1,039 Member
    Randy589 wrote: »
    I've seen those shows on TV where someone weighs many hundreds of pounds and they have obvious mental issues that explain the weight gain (emotional eating, death of a spouse, childhood trauma/abuse, etc).

    You also see the doctor tell them to lose 50+ lbs before he does the surgery. OK I get it, it's to get them eating better which they will need to do after surgery.

    So if weight loss can be done by eating better and eating at a calorie deficit, why is gastric bypass even a consideration? I don't necessarily mean the 600 lb people because those are special cases. I mean even people that are 300 lbs. If you are 600 lbs you probably do the need the surgery as that is an extreme case.

    The bypass is permanent and potentially life threatening. If you can steadily lose weight, even say 75-100 lbs per year then why go to the drastic step of surgery?

    I could be wrong but to me it seems like these people tend to view bypass surgery as the magic pill or quick fix to a long term problem. People get the surgery and then rave about how amazing it was when really they could have accomplished the same thing by changing their eating habits (albeit more slowly). Guess what it took years to gain the weight so what's wrong with taking a year or two (maybe longer if you're doing it safely) to lose the weight?

    I'm not trying to start something here. I'm serious, I'm trying to figure out in what cases surgery is really necessary. I think there are many cases where if people ate better and ate at a deficit, they would be better off in the long run. Surgery is extreme, dangerous, and costly.

    Because the "quick fix" is percieved by people as being the better way to go. Hence bariatric surgery, diet pills, etc etc etc
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,640 Member
    MeiannaLee wrote: »
    Because people are lazy.

    Is that all you have to add to the conversation? There's nothing lazy about it. Please pick up a book, or at least use google once in a while.
  • jrline
    jrline Posts: 2,353 Member
    people think it will be a magic bullet
  • Ang108
    Ang108 Posts: 1,712 Member
    edited July 2015
    AprilCoe wrote: »
    I think the bottom line is that there's a limit to willpower - which is why the person is in that position in the first place. You might do ok for 6 months and lose 50 pounds then when there's a slow down in weight loss, lose your momentum and quit trying and go back to old habits and gain 60. Gastric Bypass and other weight loss surgeries force a lifestyle change for an extended period of time - at least a year - and when it gets tough, they can't just fall back on old habits (well, some can - you've seen those that gain the weight back, or even don't lose weight at all - I'm not sure how that even happens). You do have a good point, but weight loss requires the lifestyle change that some just don't have the mental ability to enforce on themselves

    People with gastric bypass surgery need just as much willpower for just as much time and psychological support for a lot longer.
    A former neighbor of mine had the surgery, lost 55 kilos ( 121 pounds, which also can be lost the CICO way in the same amount of time, especially at her start-out weight ) in her first year and about 30-35 kilos (66- 80 pounds ) in the second.
    By that time she was still over 200 pounds, which was very disappointing to her and she gave up. In 14 month she gained enough to surpass her initial weight of just over 400 pounds. She died last year a week after Thanksgiving of complications from poorly managed diabetes which included organ failure and a heart attack. Unfortunately she had hoped to lose 250 pounds in no more than two years and then go back to her " real " life.
  • coreyreichle
    coreyreichle Posts: 1,039 Member
    Two people I know had one of the weight loss surgeries.

    One of them is back at pre-surgery weight, and then some.

    The other has gained at least half back.

    Both said it was crazy easy to get cleared for the surgery. In fact, it took 1 month to get a surgery date from initial consult. Both hardly changed their eating habits, and neither exercise at all.
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,640 Member
    ASKyle wrote: »
    If calorie counting was EASY, no one would be obese.

    Surgery comes into play because willpower varies among individuals. It makes it physically impossible to eat large QTY's of food.

    If only that were the case, but it's not.

  • happyfeetrebel1
    happyfeetrebel1 Posts: 1,005 Member
    ASKyle wrote: »
    If calorie counting was EASY, no one would be obese.

    Surgery comes into play because willpower varies among individuals. It makes it physically impossible to eat large QTY's of food.

    If only that were the case, but it's not.

    It is true in the case of a sleeve gastrectomy. If you eat more than your stomach can hold you will physically vomit it up. You overeat with that method.

    It took me quite a while to figure out what I can hold and digest properly
  • orchidbutterflies
    orchidbutterflies Posts: 59 Member
    My apologies if I offended... I realize in some places it may be harder than others to get on the waiting list and then actually be approved. I was speaking from my own personal experience of the process here in Ontario. Start to finish (finish being the surgery date) it would have taken under 6 months and that is how long it typically averages at that hospital according to the staff working in the clinic. It is covered by OHIP, so I'd imagine you don't have to jump through as many hoops as you would if you were dealing with an insurance company to cover the costs.

    It's going to vary hospital to hospital as well I would imagine.
  • Kalikel
    Kalikel Posts: 9,626 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I'm not lazy, I don't have blinders on, I was not affected by peer pressure, and it was not easy to qualify. I just passed my one year anniversary from surgery and I am being transitioned out of the program. My spot will go to someone else on the long waiting list.

    My reasons are my own and frankly from all the speculations offered here, I'm in no mood to explain my reasons.

    This is exactly why I never pester people about it. It's really your business.

    Everyone has their reasons. That's good enough.
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
    Why steroids, or implants, or synthol if weight lifting works?

    Because , in general, folks are farking lazy and will do anything to avoid being uncomfortable and doing work, right? Take the easy way out.

    If you think WLS is the 'easy way out', you know NOTHING about the surgery or the long process of medical evaluations (ranging from physical to mental) these folks go through prior to getting surgery.
  • GrammyPeachy
    GrammyPeachy Posts: 1,723 Member
    I was considering weight loss surgery and my doctor told me to diet and exercise for 6 months first. After a few months, I didn't want the surgery anymore and decided to do it on my own. In the last 13 months I have lost 130 lbs and have 30 left to lose. :)
  • bpetrosky
    bpetrosky Posts: 3,911 Member
    cherirana wrote: »
    I was considering weight loss surgery and my doctor told me to diet and exercise for 6 months first. After a few months, I didn't want the surgery anymore and decided to do it on my own. In the last 13 months I have lost 130 lbs and have 30 left to lose. :)

    Very cool, congrats on your progress.
  • atypicalsmith
    atypicalsmith Posts: 2,742 Member
    cherirana wrote: »
    I was considering weight loss surgery and my doctor told me to diet and exercise for 6 months first. After a few months, I didn't want the surgery anymore and decided to do it on my own. In the last 13 months I have lost 130 lbs and have 30 left to lose. :)

    Yay for you!!!!!
  • atypicalsmith
    atypicalsmith Posts: 2,742 Member
    edited July 2015
    When I watch 600 pound life, I don't understand why people who can't even get out of bed are overfed by those who are taking care of them. Is it all just to get on television?
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,640 Member
    ASKyle wrote: »
    If calorie counting was EASY, no one would be obese.

    Surgery comes into play because willpower varies among individuals. It makes it physically impossible to eat large QTY's of food.

    If only that were the case, but it's not.

    It is true in the case of a sleeve gastrectomy. If you eat more than your stomach can hold you will physically vomit it up. You overeat with that method.

    It took me quite a while to figure out what I can hold and digest properly

    I think that happens with all the weight loss procedures (except for the AspireAssist. Blech.). However, what I'm getting at is that someone who refuses to take initiative in regulating their own intake won't be successful with the surgery. Someone who is bound and determined to overeat, for whatever reason, will find a way. I'm not saying it's not helpful. Plenty of people on MFP will tell you it saved their lives, but it's a tool, and you have to commit to using it in order for it to work.
  • LilannB
    LilannB Posts: 99 Member
    There are people who find ways to get around their WLS. I saw one person on YT who had the sleeve who said there are ways to get around your sleeve. She spoke about still eating a whole plate of chicken wings just eating them slowly over several hours. The point to me is that if you are looking for ways around your WLS you have not committed mentally to losing weight.