Water goals

Options
So how many cups of water does everyone drink in there daily? I realize we all drink as much as possible and yes we all drink a number of cups based on specifics. Just share with me how you fit water into your lives if you are someone who doesn't like water, share if you are an avid water drinker.. And share with us how much water is too much water.. If that makes sense. I'm so glad I open discussion boards with these questions because you have no idea how many people I know including myself who aren't HUGE water fans and yes I know it's needed and I do drink it.. But I don't drink a lot of it.. Lol I know I don't drink the recommend amount for sure. I mostly drink it before workouts and I do bring it everywhere with me (bottled water) so that's how I manage. How does everyone else managed to get the recommended amounts daily?? Feel free to add me too.
«1

Replies

  • cityruss
    cityruss Posts: 2,493 Member
    Options
    Remember though, that when these "water" numbers are banded about (although there is no actual specific exact recommended daily amounts, just general recommendations), it means from any source. Fluids come from the beverages you drink and the foods that you eat.

    Tap water, bottled water, carbonated drinks, coffee, tea, fruit juice, broth, vegetable juice, mud, sports drinks, milk, watermelon (90 percent or more water by weight), wine, beer all increase your daily fluid intake.

    There is no need to be drinking xxx amount of cups of plain water.

    More information and citations here... http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/32160276
  • RodaRose
    RodaRose Posts: 9,562 Member
    Options
    I drink 4-7 cups of fluid a day depending on my foods and whether I sweat that day.
    Just forget about water. Focus on something that actually matters.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,867 Member
    edited September 2015
    Options
    i don't have water goals...i just stay hydrated. I live at elevation and I workout a lot so in the summer I can drink upwards of a gallon or more per day. I just carry a refillable water bottle around with me.

    just stay hydrated...hand wringing over "water goals" is a waste of time. 8, 8 oz glasses of water per day is just a general guideline.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    cityruss wrote: »
    Remember though, that when these "water" numbers are banded about (although there is no actual specific exact recommended daily amounts, just general recommendations), it means from any source. Fluids come from the beverages you drink and the foods that you eat.

    Tap water, bottled water, carbonated drinks, coffee, tea, fruit juice, broth, vegetable juice, mud, sports drinks, milk, watermelon (90 percent or more water by weight), wine, beer all increase your daily fluid intake.

    There is no need to be drinking xxx amount of cups of plain water.

    More information and citations here... http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/32160276

    Yes yes. I agree. Everything has water somehow in it. Lol so I can see what you are saying. Thank you for sharing this information. Definitely will read up on this again..
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    RodaRose wrote: »
    I drink 4-7 cups of fluid a day depending on my foods and whether I sweat that day.
    Just forget about water. Focus on something that actually matters.
    Haha well I mean.. For some people water is the important part. Because I'm an exercise Science major.. I kinda view it a bit differently sometimes.. But I respect your input none the less so thank for your sharing and that's more water than I drink! So kudos!!!
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    i don't have water goals...i just stay hydrated. I live at elevation and I workout a lot so in the summer I can drink upwards of a gallon or more per day. I just carry a refillable water bottle around with me.

    just stay hydrated...hand wringing over "water goals" is a waste of time. 8, 8 oz glasses of water per day is just a general guideline.

    Mhm very general. Lol. I guess I just go with the flow myself.. But then again.. Not everyone agrees with my side on water.. I mean I get crap all the time about not drinking enough water and my defense always Wow's some people.. So I totally understand thank you for sharing.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    I drink about 3 liters of water a day. I love water!
    Great job!! That's awesome!
  • Kalikel
    Kalikel Posts: 9,626 Member
    Options
    I don't count it. I drink to my thirst.

    Unless you have some physical or psychological issue that affects your sense of thirst, you can trust it to keep you hydrated. Your body knows what it needs and will let you know via the sensation of thirst that it wants more water. If you want to figure out whether or not you should have something to drink, you don't have to count, check your pee or spin in a circle to see how many times you can do it before you get dizzy. All you have to do is ask yourself if you feel like having something to drink.

    Keep water handy and drink when you're thirsty. It really is that easy.
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,641 Member
    Options
    I drink 2 qts a day. I take a water bottle with me everywhere and just sip on it. Sometimes I throw in a flavored tea bag. It's not so much for hydration as it is to keep my hand-to-mouth habit at bay.
  • oh_happy_day
    oh_happy_day Posts: 1,137 Member
    Options
    I don't count it because I know I drink plenty. I have two glasses first thing in the morning with breakfast and coffee. I keep a refillable 1 litre bottle on my work desk and a smaller one that I carry around with me - I probably refill them once or twice. I also drink a few cups of herbal tea. There's another large refillable bottle kept in my gym bag and I'd use that during/after a session. Then more water with dinner.

    I've always drunk heaps of water. As a child we weren't given juice, cordial, flavoured milk or soft drink, so drinking water all the time and with meals is the norm. I live in a tropical environment so between the heat and the air conditioning, the thirst is real! I also talk a lot for my job which is why I carry water with me to sip on.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    Kalikel wrote: »
    I don't count it. I drink to my thirst.

    Unless you have some physical or psychological issue that affects your sense of thirst, you can trust it to keep you hydrated. Your body knows what it needs and will let you know via the sensation of thirst that it wants more water. If you want to figure out whether or not you should have something to drink, you don't have to count, check your pee or spin in a circle to see how many times you can do it before you get dizzy. All you have to do is ask yourself if you feel like having something to drink.

    Keep water handy and drink when you're thirsty. It really is that easy.

    Not to argue, but actually "being thirsty" is a bad indicator as to whether you should drink something or not because normally you are thirsty before your brain responds to it. The best way is the urine check, so I agree with that. Thank you for sharing
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    I drink 2 qts a day. I take a water bottle with me everywhere and just sip on it. Sometimes I throw in a flavored tea bag. It's not so much for hydration as it is to keep my hand-to-mouth habit at bay.

    Ahh gotcha. Okay.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    I don't count it because I know I drink plenty. I have two glasses first thing in the morning with breakfast and coffee. I keep a refillable 1 litre bottle on my work desk and a smaller one that I carry around with me - I probably refill them once or twice. I also drink a few cups of herbal tea. There's another large refillable bottle kept in my gym bag and I'd use that during/after a session. Then more water with dinner.

    I've always drunk heaps of water. As a child we weren't given juice, cordial, flavoured milk or soft drink, so drinking water all the time and with meals is the norm. I live in a tropical environment so between the heat and the air conditioning, the thirst is real! I also talk a lot for my job which is why I carry water with me to sip on.

    Wow okay! Very nice. Great areas to have it. Yes I like keeping a water on me too!
  • cityruss
    cityruss Posts: 2,493 Member
    Options
    Kalikel wrote: »
    I don't count it. I drink to my thirst.

    Unless you have some physical or psychological issue that affects your sense of thirst, you can trust it to keep you hydrated. Your body knows what it needs and will let you know via the sensation of thirst that it wants more water. If you want to figure out whether or not you should have something to drink, you don't have to count, check your pee or spin in a circle to see how many times you can do it before you get dizzy. All you have to do is ask yourself if you feel like having something to drink.

    Keep water handy and drink when you're thirsty. It really is that easy.

    Not to argue, but actually "being thirsty" is a bad indicator as to whether you should drink something or not because normally you are thirsty before your brain responds to it. The best way is the urine check, so I agree with that. Thank you for sharing

    Are you advising generally healthy average Joe everyday people that before they decide whether to drink or not they check their urine?

    As previously posted, the general consensus for healthy adults is that letting thirst guide the need for hydration is the way to go.

    Or do you disagree with the National Academies/Institute of Medicine?

    http://iom.nationalacademies.org/Reports/2004/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-Water-Potassium-Sodium-Chloride-and-Sulfate.aspx

    Also...
    Advocates of the 8 x 8 guideline sometimes claim that thirst is a poor hydration indicator. They assert that many people are so chronically dehydrated they no longer recognize their bodies' signals for water. Barbara Rolls, professor of nutrition sciences at the Pennsylvania State University, disagrees. Her studies, she says, "found no evidence that people are chronically dehydrated." Although some drugs can cause problems with thirst regulation and the elderly may not experience thirst as intensely as younger people, Rolls maintains that most healthy people are adequately hydrated.

    So how much water should you drink? Here's their advice: If you have specific medical concerns, talk to your doctor. But if you are healthy, Rolls recommends that you "have a beverage with meals and drink when you are thirsty." In other words, heed your thirst signals, enjoy that watermelon, and stop feeling guilty for not guzzling those extra glasses.

    Also...

    Valtin Heinz. “Drink at least eight glasses of water a day.” Really? Is there scientific evidence for “8 x 8”? Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 283: R993–R1004, 2002.

    Kolso J, Jeckel K, Wildman EC. Water, Hydration and Health: What Dietetics Practitioners Need to Know. SCAN’s Pulse Winter 2012 Vol.31, No. 1.

    Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. U.S. Department of Agricultural, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2010Pg 22

    Fulgoni VL III, Keast DR, Bailey RL, Dwyer J. Foods, fortificants, and supplements: where do Americans get their nutrients? J Nutr 2011;141:1847-54.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    g
    cityruss wrote: »
    Kalikel wrote: »
    I don't count it. I drink to my thirst.

    Unless you have some physical or psychological issue that affects your sense of thirst, you can trust it to keep you hydrated. Your body knows what it needs and will let you know via the sensation of thirst that it wants more water. If you want to figure out whether or not you should have something to drink, you don't have to count, check your pee or spin in a circle to see how many times you can do it before you get dizzy. All you have to do is ask yourself if you feel like having something to drink.

    Keep water handy and drink when you're thirsty. It really is that easy.

    Not to argue, but actually "being thirsty" is a bad indicator as to whether you should drink something or not because normally you are thirsty before your brain responds to it. The best way is the urine check, so I agree with that. Thank you for sharing

    Are you advising generally healthy average Joe everyday people that before they decide whether to drink or not they check their urine?

    As previously posted, the general consensus for healthy adults is that letting thirst guide the need for hydration is the way to go.

    Or do you disagree with the National Academies/Institute of Medicine?

    http://iom.nationalacademies.org/Reports/2004/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-Water-Potassium-Sodium-Chloride-and-Sulfate.aspx

    Also...
    Advocates of the 8 x 8 guideline sometimes claim that thirst is a poor hydration indicator. They assert that many people are so chronically dehydrated they no longer recognize their bodies' signals for water. Barbara Rolls, professor of nutrition sciences at the Pennsylvania State University, disagrees. Her studies, she says, "found no evidence that people are chronically dehydrated." Although some drugs can cause problems with thirst regulation and the elderly may not experience thirst as intensely as younger people, Rolls maintains that most healthy people are adequately hydrated.

    So how much water should you drink? Here's their advice: If you have specific medical concerns, talk to your doctor. But if you are healthy, Rolls recommends that you "have a beverage with meals and drink when you are thirsty." In other words, heed your thirst signals, enjoy that watermelon, and stop feeling guilty for not guzzling those extra glasses.

    Also...

    Valtin Heinz. “Drink at least eight glasses of water a day.” Really? Is there scientific evidence for “8 x 8”? Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 283: R993–R1004, 2002.

    Kolso J, Jeckel K, Wildman EC. Water, Hydration and Health: What Dietetics Practitioners Need to Know. SCAN’s Pulse Winter 2012 Vol.31, No. 1.

    Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. U.S. Department of Agricultural, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2010Pg 22

    Fulgoni VL III, Keast DR, Bailey RL, Dwyer J. Foods, fortificants, and supplements: where do Americans get their nutrients? J Nutr 2011;141:1847-54.

    I do disagree with your information but I'm entitled to because like I said going by just thirst alone does not keep you hydrated. Now if you do not like my side and opinion, Fine by me, but don't make a argument out of my facts and opinions because no one is making one out of yours. Thank you
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
    Options
    And I'm
    g
    cityruss wrote: »
    Kalikel wrote: »
    I don't count it. I drink to my thirst.

    Unless you have some physical or psychological issue that affects your sense of thirst, you can trust it to keep you hydrated. Your body knows what it needs and will let you know via the sensation of thirst that it wants more water. If you want to figure out whether or not you should have something to drink, you don't have to count, check your pee or spin in a circle to see how many times you can do it before you get dizzy. All you have to do is ask yourself if you feel like having something to drink.

    Keep water handy and drink when you're thirsty. It really is that easy.

    Not to argue, but actually "being thirsty" is a bad indicator as to whether you should drink something or not because normally you are thirsty before your brain responds to it. The best way is the urine check, so I agree with that. Thank you for sharing

    Are you advising generally healthy average Joe everyday people that before they decide whether to drink or not they check their urine?

    As previously posted, the general consensus for healthy adults is that letting thirst guide the need for hydration is the way to go.

    Or do you disagree with the National Academies/Institute of Medicine?

    http://iom.nationalacademies.org/Reports/2004/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-Water-Potassium-Sodium-Chloride-and-Sulfate.aspx

    Also...
    Advocates of the 8 x 8 guideline sometimes claim that thirst is a poor hydration indicator. They assert that many people are so chronically dehydrated they no longer recognize their bodies' signals for water. Barbara Rolls, professor of nutrition sciences at the Pennsylvania State University, disagrees. Her studies, she says, "found no evidence that people are chronically dehydrated." Although some drugs can cause problems with thirst regulation and the elderly may not experience thirst as intensely as younger people, Rolls maintains that most healthy people are adequately hydrated.

    So how much water should you drink? Here's their advice: If you have specific medical concerns, talk to your doctor. But if you are healthy, Rolls recommends that you "have a beverage with meals and drink when you are thirsty." In other words, heed your thirst signals, enjoy that watermelon, and stop feeling guilty for not guzzling those extra glasses.

    Also...

    Valtin Heinz. “Drink at least eight glasses of water a day.” Really? Is there scientific evidence for “8 x 8”? Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 283: R993–R1004, 2002.

    Kolso J, Jeckel K, Wildman EC. Water, Hydration and Health: What Dietetics Practitioners Need to Know. SCAN’s Pulse Winter 2012 Vol.31, No. 1.

    Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. U.S. Department of Agricultural, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2010Pg 22

    Fulgoni VL III, Keast DR, Bailey RL, Dwyer J. Foods, fortificants, and supplements: where do Americans get their nutrients? J Nutr 2011;141:1847-54.

    I do disagree with your information but I'm entitled to because like I said going by just thirst alone does not keep you hydrated. Now if you do not like my side and opinion, Fine by me, but don't make a argument out of my facts and opinions because no one is making one out of yours. Thank you

    And I never said.. Check your urine to decide if you are thirsty. I said check your urine to see if you are properly hydrated. For someone like myself who does want to know. I do check my urine but then again that's me and my choice. No one said everyone had to follow my lead.
  • yesimpson
    yesimpson Posts: 1,372 Member
    edited September 2015
    Options
    I don't set myself a specific number of glasses of water a day. I just go by thirst, colour of urine, and if I'm getting a headache or a dry mouth I know I should have had a drink a half hour ago. I naturally drink a lot if it's available so I've never worried, I just leave a full bottle of water on my work desk and I sip all day long. If I'm exercising, or planning to exercise after work, I make an extra effort to drink a little more, because I get a thumping headache if I get dehydrated.
  • 999tigger
    999tigger Posts: 5,235 Member
    Options
    Dunno I dont fret about it, just drink regularly and often. If my urine is too dark, ill drink more, if im thirsty I drink more, if I havent drunk for a while then I will drink more. If ive been to the gym then I stay hydrated by drinking consistently.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,786 Member
    Options
    I've amply demonstrated to myself, over & over, even before losing weight, that I do poorly if I don't get enough fluids. I sweat copiously (not everyone does), and if I drink too little my digestive system slows down, plus I get fatigued. Besides, I *like* water.

    Most days, I get 8-11 cups of water or other beverages that I don't find diuretic (i.e., I count my green tea, matcha, and most herb tea in addition to water).

    I always have a refillable water bottle when working out or away from convenient water sources for multi-hour periods, and I keep a glass of water at hand if I'm at home.

    People kinda have religious wars about water sometimes ;) , but I've just experimented over the years & do what works best for me.
  • cityruss
    cityruss Posts: 2,493 Member
    Options
    g
    cityruss wrote: »
    Kalikel wrote: »
    I don't count it. I drink to my thirst.

    Unless you have some physical or psychological issue that affects your sense of thirst, you can trust it to keep you hydrated. Your body knows what it needs and will let you know via the sensation of thirst that it wants more water. If you want to figure out whether or not you should have something to drink, you don't have to count, check your pee or spin in a circle to see how many times you can do it before you get dizzy. All you have to do is ask yourself if you feel like having something to drink.

    Keep water handy and drink when you're thirsty. It really is that easy.

    Not to argue, but actually "being thirsty" is a bad indicator as to whether you should drink something or not because normally you are thirsty before your brain responds to it. The best way is the urine check, so I agree with that. Thank you for sharing

    Are you advising generally healthy average Joe everyday people that before they decide whether to drink or not they check their urine?

    As previously posted, the general consensus for healthy adults is that letting thirst guide the need for hydration is the way to go.

    Or do you disagree with the National Academies/Institute of Medicine?

    http://iom.nationalacademies.org/Reports/2004/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-Water-Potassium-Sodium-Chloride-and-Sulfate.aspx

    Also...
    Advocates of the 8 x 8 guideline sometimes claim that thirst is a poor hydration indicator. They assert that many people are so chronically dehydrated they no longer recognize their bodies' signals for water. Barbara Rolls, professor of nutrition sciences at the Pennsylvania State University, disagrees. Her studies, she says, "found no evidence that people are chronically dehydrated." Although some drugs can cause problems with thirst regulation and the elderly may not experience thirst as intensely as younger people, Rolls maintains that most healthy people are adequately hydrated.

    So how much water should you drink? Here's their advice: If you have specific medical concerns, talk to your doctor. But if you are healthy, Rolls recommends that you "have a beverage with meals and drink when you are thirsty." In other words, heed your thirst signals, enjoy that watermelon, and stop feeling guilty for not guzzling those extra glasses.

    Also...

    Valtin Heinz. “Drink at least eight glasses of water a day.” Really? Is there scientific evidence for “8 x 8”? Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 283: R993–R1004, 2002.

    Kolso J, Jeckel K, Wildman EC. Water, Hydration and Health: What Dietetics Practitioners Need to Know. SCAN’s Pulse Winter 2012 Vol.31, No. 1.

    Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. U.S. Department of Agricultural, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2010Pg 22

    Fulgoni VL III, Keast DR, Bailey RL, Dwyer J. Foods, fortificants, and supplements: where do Americans get their nutrients? J Nutr 2011;141:1847-54.

    I do disagree with your information but I'm entitled to because like I said going by just thirst alone does not keep you hydrated. Now if you do not like my side and opinion, Fine by me, but don't make a argument out of my facts and opinions because no one is making one out of yours. Thank you

    Just hang on a minute.

    I'm not disliking your opinion, I'm not making an argument.

    This is a public internet forum, and if I wish to challenge something that someone has posted, I will, especially when it's so wrong and flies in the face of all the available literature.

    This is not my information, I'm presenting the latest evidence and guidelines set out by national bodies. You do realize that what you are saying goes against what the National Academies/Institute of Medicine and the latest consensus, guidelines and best practice statements say, don't you.

    Please feel free to show me some evidence to back up your statement that..
    going by just thirst alone does not keep you hydrated

    As I have presented you with plenty that it does.