Cauliflower$$$

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  • jenmsu83
    jenmsu83 Posts: 185 Member
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    I am bummed cauliflower is so expensive these days. It's almost $5.00/head here in Michigan. I really want to make some cauliflower "steaks"! Can't do that with frozen though, unfortunately. :(
  • Colorscheme
    Colorscheme Posts: 1,179 Member
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    It really isn't a substitute for rice, or hash browns, or whatever monstrosities others make out of it that are meant to replace potatoes and other starches.
    Considering how many recipes there are for faux dishes using it, it must be an acceptable substitute for many people. It probably helps if you like the flavor of cooked cauliflower and are not too picky about textures.

    I don't mind that other people use cauliflower in different dishes, I just don't think it's accurate to say that cauliflower is an amazing rice or potatoe substitute, because it isn't. I've tried cauliflower hash browns, cauliflower cheese bakes, cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes, cauliflower pizza crust, etc. But it's a poor substitute for starchy foods. Maybe that's just me, IDK.

    The other thing is, I find nothing wrong with eating potatoes. They're fiberous and full of potassium.
  • TeaBea
    TeaBea Posts: 14,517 Member
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    It really isn't a substitute for rice, or hash browns, or whatever monstrosities others make out of it that are meant to replace potatoes and other starches.
    Considering how many recipes there are for faux dishes using it, it must be an acceptable substitute for many people. It probably helps if you like the flavor of cooked cauliflower and are not too picky about textures.

    I don't mind that other people use cauliflower in different dishes, I just don't think it's accurate to say that cauliflower is an amazing rice or potatoe substitute, because it isn't. I've tried cauliflower hash browns, cauliflower cheese bakes, cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes, cauliflower pizza crust, etc. But it's a poor substitute for starchy foods. Maybe that's just me, IDK.

    The other thing is, I find nothing wrong with eating potatoes. They're fiberous and full of potassium.

    I agree with this.

    I'm all for adding cauliflower (and other veggies) to things to reduce overall calories. But for me cauliflower rice is not a life long substitute for rice. Will people be eating cauliflower pizza crust long after the weight is gone? I don't think so.

    I eat rice, I eat pizza crust. There's nothing wrong with that.
  • shathaway123
    shathaway123 Posts: 13 Member
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    The other day at Trader Joe's, cauliflower was $1.99/head. I bought it:)
  • ASKyle
    ASKyle Posts: 1,475 Member
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    How do you make cauliflower rice from frozen? Do you cook it first? I imagine it being mushy.
  • WalkingAlong
    WalkingAlong Posts: 4,926 Member
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    It really isn't a substitute for rice, or hash browns, or whatever monstrosities others make out of it that are meant to replace potatoes and other starches.
    Considering how many recipes there are for faux dishes using it, it must be an acceptable substitute for many people. It probably helps if you like the flavor of cooked cauliflower and are not too picky about textures.

    I don't mind that other people use cauliflower in different dishes, I just don't think it's accurate to say that cauliflower is an amazing rice or potatoe substitute, because it isn't. I've tried cauliflower hash browns, cauliflower cheese bakes, cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes, cauliflower pizza crust, etc. But it's a poor substitute for starchy foods. Maybe that's just me, IDK.

    The other thing is, I find nothing wrong with eating potatoes. They're fiberous and full of potassium.

    I don't like it much as a sub for potatoes or flour, either, but I get tired of hearing people who DO like it as a substitute ridiculed. Maybe that wasn't your intent. Saying "It's not a substitute in whatever monstrosities..." sounds like "I'm the authority", not "this is my opinion but, hey, enjoy".

    Nothing wrong with potatoes, nothing wrong with flour, but nothing wrong with people trying to get more veggies and less potatoes and flour in their diets in whatever ways appeal to them.
  • ald783
    ald783 Posts: 688 Member
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    It really isn't a substitute for rice, or hash browns, or whatever monstrosities others make out of it that are meant to replace potatoes and other starches.
    Considering how many recipes there are for faux dishes using it, it must be an acceptable substitute for many people. It probably helps if you like the flavor of cooked cauliflower and are not too picky about textures.

    I don't mind that other people use cauliflower in different dishes, I just don't think it's accurate to say that cauliflower is an amazing rice or potatoe substitute, because it isn't. I've tried cauliflower hash browns, cauliflower cheese bakes, cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes, cauliflower pizza crust, etc. But it's a poor substitute for starchy foods. Maybe that's just me, IDK.

    The other thing is, I find nothing wrong with eating potatoes. They're fiberous and full of potassium.

    I don't like it much as a sub for potatoes or flour, either, but I get tired of hearing people who DO like it as a substitute ridiculed. Maybe that wasn't your intent. Saying "It's not a substitute in whatever monstrosities..." sounds like "I'm the authority", not "this is my opinion but, hey, enjoy".

    Nothing wrong with potatoes, nothing wrong with flour, but nothing wrong with people trying to get more veggies and less potatoes and flour in their diets in whatever ways appeal to them.

    That's exactly how I feel. And cauliflower is a veggie with a lot of nutrients and health benefits so it's not like people are swapping in some kind of chemically enhanced plastic in lieu of the real stuff (and even if they wanted to, so be it, eat what you want to eat, people). It took me some time to come around to cauliflower but now one of my favorite things about it is its versatility. And I actually find that cauliflower "rice" tastes really similar to a grain, but more like cous cous or quinoa than rice. In the end they're both fairly bland in flavor so it sort of boils down to what texture you make it into.

    Lately I've been into baked buffalo cauliflower bites which would not work well with frozen cauliflower, unfortunately, so I've been sucking it up and paying $5 for a small head. My grocery store said it had to do with the weather in Mexico. Not sure how long that will affect production.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,988 Member
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    It really isn't a substitute for rice, or hash browns, or whatever monstrosities others make out of it that are meant to replace potatoes and other starches.
    Considering how many recipes there are for faux dishes using it, it must be an acceptable substitute for many people. It probably helps if you like the flavor of cooked cauliflower and are not too picky about textures.

    I don't mind that other people use cauliflower in different dishes, I just don't think it's accurate to say that cauliflower is an amazing rice or potatoe substitute, because it isn't. I've tried cauliflower hash browns, cauliflower cheese bakes, cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes, cauliflower pizza crust, etc. But it's a poor substitute for starchy foods. Maybe that's just me, IDK.

    The other thing is, I find nothing wrong with eating potatoes. They're fiberous and full of potassium.

    Agreed.
  • WalkingAlong
    WalkingAlong Posts: 4,926 Member
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    I don't like canned tuna. I wouldn't jump into a thread about it and ridicule others' use of it or use of adjectives to describe it. Because no one cares that I don't like canned tuna.
  • vivmom2014
    vivmom2014 Posts: 1,647 Member
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    East coast here, just outside DC. Trader Joe's and Aldi both have fresh cauliflower for $2.49. It hasn't changed in eons.
  • MiloBloom83
    MiloBloom83 Posts: 2,724 Member
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    I finally decided to try the recipe for cauliflower fried rice. Yesterday I went to my nearest Winco, and cauliflower was $5.00 a head!! There was even little black spots on them. Needless to say I did not purchase any. Whats up with that?

    Your grocer was saving you from making a horrible mistake...

  • Last_mango_in_paradise
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    TeaBea wrote: »
    It really isn't a substitute for rice, or hash browns, or whatever monstrosities others make out of it that are meant to replace potatoes and other starches.
    Considering how many recipes there are for faux dishes using it, it must be an acceptable substitute for many people. It probably helps if you like the flavor of cooked cauliflower and are not too picky about textures.

    I don't mind that other people use cauliflower in different dishes, I just don't think it's accurate to say that cauliflower is an amazing rice or potatoe substitute, because it isn't. I've tried cauliflower hash browns, cauliflower cheese bakes, cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes, cauliflower pizza crust, etc. But it's a poor substitute for starchy foods. Maybe that's just me, IDK.

    The other thing is, I find nothing wrong with eating potatoes. They're fiberous and full of potassium.

    I agree with this.

    I'm all for adding cauliflower (and other veggies) to things to reduce overall calories. But for me cauliflower rice is not a life long substitute for rice. Will people be eating cauliflower pizza crust long after the weight is gone? I don't think so.

    I eat rice, I eat pizza crust. There's nothing wrong with that.

    I have actually made a pretty tasty cauliflower pilaf.
  • bayliekatie
    bayliekatie Posts: 4 Member
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    Do you have an ALDI near you? I just paid $1.49 a head on Saturday at ALDI! Granted I'm in the midwest so things are cheaper anyways, but anywhere I've gone ALDI has been much cheaper
  • motterotter
    motterotter Posts: 701 Member
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    Just cut off the black spots
    But seriously $5 a head is supercaulifraudulisticpricegouginglyatrocious
  • peleroja
    peleroja Posts: 3,979 Member
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    I finally decided to try the recipe for cauliflower fried rice. Yesterday I went to my nearest Winco, and cauliflower was $5.00 a head!! There was even little black spots on them. Needless to say I did not purchase any. Whats up with that?

    What about farmers market?

    In January? Most of us, I think, do not live in a climate where that's possible.

    Cauliflower has been that expensive here too recently because of the California thing, so even though I like it I've switched to whatever I can actually find at a reasonable price at my grocery store. Fortunately I like almost all vegetables so I'll get whatever's available and not heinously overpriced (which is...not a lot, right now, thanks again to California and our terrible dollar.)
  • lithezebra
    lithezebra Posts: 3,670 Member
    edited January 2016
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    It really isn't a substitute for rice, or hash browns, or whatever monstrosities others make out of it that are meant to replace potatoes and other starches.
    Considering how many recipes there are for faux dishes using it, it must be an acceptable substitute for many people. It probably helps if you like the flavor of cooked cauliflower and are not too picky about textures.

    I don't mind that other people use cauliflower in different dishes, I just don't think it's accurate to say that cauliflower is an amazing rice or potatoe substitute, because it isn't. I've tried cauliflower hash browns, cauliflower cheese bakes, cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes, cauliflower pizza crust, etc. But it's a poor substitute for starchy foods. Maybe that's just me, IDK.

    The other thing is, I find nothing wrong with eating potatoes. They're fiberous and full of potassium.

    I've been finding that since I've been eating low carb, cauliflower, mostly roasted until it's chewy and browned, makes an excellent emotional substitute for starchy foods. I don't call it "rice" or "potatoes," but it's delicious and makes a good based for some of the toppings I would have previously had on pasta, rice, or potatoes.

    I'm staying away from starchy foods to lower my cholesterol - MD's suggestion.
  • ald783
    ald783 Posts: 688 Member
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    ald783 wrote: »
    It really isn't a substitute for rice, or hash browns, or whatever monstrosities others make out of it that are meant to replace potatoes and other starches.
    Considering how many recipes there are for faux dishes using it, it must be an acceptable substitute for many people. It probably helps if you like the flavor of cooked cauliflower and are not too picky about textures.

    I don't mind that other people use cauliflower in different dishes, I just don't think it's accurate to say that cauliflower is an amazing rice or potatoe substitute, because it isn't. I've tried cauliflower hash browns, cauliflower cheese bakes, cauliflower rice, cauliflower mashed potatoes, cauliflower pizza crust, etc. But it's a poor substitute for starchy foods. Maybe that's just me, IDK.

    The other thing is, I find nothing wrong with eating potatoes. They're fiberous and full of potassium.

    I don't like it much as a sub for potatoes or flour, either, but I get tired of hearing people who DO like it as a substitute ridiculed. Maybe that wasn't your intent. Saying "It's not a substitute in whatever monstrosities..." sounds like "I'm the authority", not "this is my opinion but, hey, enjoy".

    Nothing wrong with potatoes, nothing wrong with flour, but nothing wrong with people trying to get more veggies and less potatoes and flour in their diets in whatever ways appeal to them.

    That's exactly how I feel. And cauliflower is a veggie with a lot of nutrients and health benefits so it's not like people are swapping in some kind of chemically enhanced plastic in lieu of the real stuff (and even if they wanted to, so be it, eat what you want to eat, people). It took me some time to come around to cauliflower but now one of my favorite things about it is its versatility. And I actually find that cauliflower "rice" tastes really similar to a grain, but more like cous cous or quinoa than rice. In the end they're both fairly bland in flavor so it sort of boils down to what texture you make it into.

    Lately I've been into baked buffalo cauliflower bites which would not work well with frozen cauliflower, unfortunately, so I've been sucking it up and paying $5 for a small head. My grocery store said it had to do with the weather in Mexico. Not sure how long that will affect production.

    Agreed. I like cauliflower (and potatoes).

    There's a dish served at a local Indian restaurant around here that's cauliflower fritters served with a sauce like Chinese-style sweet and sour pork but spicier (an Indian/Chinese hybrid). It's called Gobi Manchurian. It's delicious and constantly making it on local newspaper top lists. I'm sure a bunch of people around here would clutch their pearls and insist that it's no substitute for pork, but I mention it because you might like it and it's probably pretty similar to your buffalo bites.

    gobi_manchurian.jpg

    That sounds (and looks) delicious. I'm a happy meat eater, carb eater, grain eater, and mostly everything else under the sun, but I like anything that tastes good and I don't really care if it comes from stuff that seems unusual and nontraditional. I just like it to taste good, whether it's as a substitute for something else or in its own right. I'm certainly not complaining when one of those good tasting things is on the lighter end of the calorie spectrum now and then too.
  • seltzermint555
    seltzermint555 Posts: 10,741 Member
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    Buy frozen cauliflower. Same thing, but cheaper.

    yup

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,988 Member
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    I don't like canned tuna. I wouldn't jump into a thread about it and ridicule others' use of it or use of adjectives to describe it. Because no one cares that I don't like canned tuna.

    I like using cauliflower as a non-starchy veg just fine. What I don't like is using it as a starch sub.