The water struggle

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Replies

  • kami3006
    kami3006 Posts: 4,976 Member
    larali1980 wrote: »
    463-0012.jpg

    I am obsessed with these lately.... I drink like 5-6 of them per day.

    I buy the 4c energy drinks and thow them in the freezer for a couple hours. They make the best slushies and are very refreshing.
  • Josalinn
    Josalinn Posts: 1,066 Member
    I have a 1000ml water bottle. I keep it with me and try to drink 100ml every half hour. Though I might have to look into plant nanny.
  • angerelle
    angerelle Posts: 174 Member
    I take water with me when I'm running and have a glass of sparkling water with my dinner. I have a cup of tea or two a day and a latte, then a glass of water by my bed. That's plenty for me and I've lost weight at a good rate. You don't need to drink unless you're thirsty - if your wee is a nice pale straw colour you are getting enough fluid - you'll be getting it in your food too. The whole requirement to drink a certain amount is fallacious.
  • Hornsby
    Hornsby Posts: 10,325 Member
    I very rarely drink plain water. Just doesn't do it for me.

    I just watch my pee. If it's light and clear, I'm good to go. No need to complicate things.
  • Kyrenora
    Kyrenora Posts: 133 Member
    Pawsforme wrote: »
    Kyrenora wrote: »
    Pawsforme wrote: »
    I prefer my water flavored. As in coffee, tea and Diet Pepsi. If I had to drink plain water . . . no, I don't even want to consider the horror.

    Be careful if you're counting caffeinated drinks as hydration. Caffeine has a diuretic effect, so you don't get nearly as much hydration as you would from a decaffeinated source.

    No. That has been disproven..

    That article says that you can work up a tolerance to the diuretic effects. I know it doesn't cause dehydration. I only said that it's not AS hydrating, which that article confirms about halfway down.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    I really don't worry about my water intake. We get water from our food as well as drinks. I'm not going to force liquids down because of some arbitrary rule someone made up at some point. As long as I'm not getting very thirsty and my pee isn't too dark I'm happy. If I drank as much as some people assert you need I'd never be out of the toilet!
  • queenliz99
    queenliz99 Posts: 15,317 Member
    I really don't worry about my water intake. We get water from our food as well as drinks. I'm not going to force liquids down because of some arbitrary rule someone made up at some point. As long as I'm not getting very thirsty and my pee isn't too dark I'm happy. If I drank as much as some people assert you need I'd never be out of the toilet!

    Or get a good night's sleep
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,514 Member
    Kyrenora wrote: »
    Pawsforme wrote: »
    Kyrenora wrote: »
    Pawsforme wrote: »
    I prefer my water flavored. As in coffee, tea and Diet Pepsi. If I had to drink plain water . . . no, I don't even want to consider the horror.

    Be careful if you're counting caffeinated drinks as hydration. Caffeine has a diuretic effect, so you don't get nearly as much hydration as you would from a decaffeinated source.

    No. That has been disproven..

    That article says that you can work up a tolerance to the diuretic effects. I know it doesn't cause dehydration. I only said that it's not AS hydrating, which that article confirms about halfway down.

    Okay then, how about an actual review of scientific research instead of just an article?

    Cliff's Notes:
    caffeine consumption stimulates a mild diuresis similar to water, but there is no evidence of a fluid-electrolyte imbalance that is detrimental to exercise performance or health. Investigations comparing caffeine (100-680 mg) to water or placebo seldom found a statistical difference in urine volume. In the 10 studies reviewed, consumption of a CB resulted in 0-84% retention of the initial volume ingested, whereas consumption of water resulted in 0-81% retention.

    In other words, the diuretic effect of caffeinated beverages is equivalent to that of drinking plain water.
  • dubird
    dubird Posts: 1,854 Member
    I hate the taste of water, so I get my hydration through tea and G2. I will use some of the squeeze flavors for working out, but don't really like those as much since I can't find my favorite Propel anymore. ><
  • Pawsforme
    Pawsforme Posts: 645 Member
    edited January 2016
    Sigh. I posted the article because it's easy to read (for those who prefer that) and because it has links to actual studies. Key takeaways from the studies linked in the article:

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of rehydration with a caffeinated beverage during nonexercise periods on hydration status throughout consecutive practices in the heat. Ten (7 women, 3 men) partially heat- acclimated athletes (age 24 +/-1y, body fat 19.2 +/- 2 %, weight 68.4 +/- 4.0 kg, height 170 +/- 3 cm) completed 3 successive days of 2-a-day practices (2 h/practice, 4 h/d) in mild heat (WBGT = 23 C). The 2 trials (double-blind, random, cross-over design) included; 1) caffeine (CAF) rehydrated with Coca-Cola and 2) caffeine-free (CF) rehydrated with Caffeine-Free Coca-Cola. Urine and psychological measures were determined before and after each 2-h practice. A significant difference was found for urine color for the post-AM time point, F = 5.526, P = 0.031. No differences were found among other variables (P > 0.05). In summary, there is little evidence to suggest that the use of beverages containing caffeine during nonexercise might hinder hydration status.

    With acknowledgement of the study's limitations, results suggest that coffee did not result in dehydration when provided in a moderate dose of 4 mg/kg BW caffeine in four cups per day. Thus, these data suggest that coffee, when consumed in moderation by caffeine habituated males contributes to daily fluid requirement and does not pose a detrimental effect to fluid balance. The advice provided in the public health domain regarding coffee intake and hydration status should therefore be updated to reflect these findings.