Butter in coffee

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Replies

  • tincanonastring
    tincanonastring Posts: 3,944 Member
    edited January 2016
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    Wetcoaster wrote: »
    http://www.evilsugarradio.com/episode-13-cholesterol-genetics-carbs-with-dr-spencer-nadolsky/127/

    Dr Spencer Nadolksy wrote a paper where he had done advanced blood lipid work on clients who were drinking Bullet Proof Coffee. Their blood work was terrible and returned to normal after they eliminated Bullet Proof Coffee.

    High fat with high carb is a less than ideal mix... Is that what people did there? Just add BPC to a normal diet?

    Most people who are low carb and consume BPC have their lipid panel improve...

    I assume that's a well researched statement and you're able to point us to your source material?

    The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Liing by Phinney and Volek, the Great Cholesterol Myth, Cholesterol Clarity by Moore, or Cholesterol Con.

    Low carb diets generally raise HDL, lower triglycerides, lower Lp-a, and leave LDL the same or slightly raise it but LDL will switch to the earthier pattern A type.

    BPC is a fine part of a low carb diet and can help contribute to improved lipids. I wouldn't advise mixing BPC with a big bagel or a stack of pancakes with lots of syrup. BPC is not magic, but as part of a low carb high fat diet it can be healthful.

    That's awesome. Can you please point to the excerpt that supports your statement that "Most people who are low carb and consume BPC have their lipid panel improve?"

    The excerpt that says that exact sentence of mine? Really?

    I guess I should have simply said that people on a low carb high fat diet will usually see their lipid panel improved with higher HDL, lower triglycerides, lower Lp a, and a similar or slightly higher LDL which will improve to a fluffier pattern A type. If those said low carbers choose to put their extra fats, in the form of butter, into their coffee rather than onto their green beans at dinner, will not affect anything. Consuming more fats with fewer carbs is what appears to improve lipids.

    No, not that exact sentence, but at least something to do with BPC. So the part about "low carb and consume BPC" having lipid panels improve wasn't actually supported by that citation? Does that book have anything in it about BPC? If not, why would you bring it into a thread about BPC to support a statement that BPC and a low-carb diet will improve lipid panels?

    People who drink BPC are generally low carb. Low carbers will usually see improved lipid panels. I am not saying that BPC improves lipids. I am saying that LCHF diets generally improve lipids and that BPC can be a part of that diet.

    My original statement was in response to what I am guessing a very anti-low carb biased study on "evilsugarradio". Looks like woo to me based on all I have read and learned from theirs who eat low carb high fat. I will not go looking just to provide you with a quote. You'll have to take my word for it or do your own research.

    So, that's a no, then? You've never actually read anything that states, "Most people who are low carb and consume BPC have their lipid panel improve." Next time, if someone asks, just be honest and admit you made it up.

    ETA: https://www.yourlogicalfallacyis.com/burden-of-proof
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    Wetcoaster wrote: »
    http://www.evilsugarradio.com/episode-13-cholesterol-genetics-carbs-with-dr-spencer-nadolsky/127/

    Dr Spencer Nadolksy wrote a paper where he had done advanced blood lipid work on clients who were drinking Bullet Proof Coffee. Their blood work was terrible and returned to normal after they eliminated Bullet Proof Coffee.

    High fat with high carb is a less than ideal mix... Is that what people did there? Just add BPC to a normal diet?

    Most people who are low carb and consume BPC have their lipid panel improve...

    I assume that's a well researched statement and you're able to point us to your source material?

    The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Liing by Phinney and Volek, the Great Cholesterol Myth, Cholesterol Clarity by Moore, or Cholesterol Con.

    Low carb diets generally raise HDL, lower triglycerides, lower Lp-a, and leave LDL the same or slightly raise it but LDL will switch to the earthier pattern A type.

    BPC is a fine part of a low carb diet and can help contribute to improved lipids. I wouldn't advise mixing BPC with a big bagel or a stack of pancakes with lots of syrup. BPC is not magic, but as part of a low carb high fat diet it can be healthful.

    That's awesome. Can you please point to the excerpt that supports your statement that "Most people who are low carb and consume BPC have their lipid panel improve?"

    The excerpt that says that exact sentence of mine? Really?

    I guess I should have simply said that people on a low carb high fat diet will usually see their lipid panel improved with higher HDL, lower triglycerides, lower Lp a, and a similar or slightly higher LDL which will improve to a fluffier pattern A type. If those said low carbers choose to put their extra fats, in the form of butter, into their coffee rather than onto their green beans at dinner, will not affect anything. Consuming more fats with fewer carbs is what appears to improve lipids.

    No, not that exact sentence, but at least something to do with BPC. So the part about "low carb and consume BPC" having lipid panels improve wasn't actually supported by that citation? Does that book have anything in it about BPC? If not, why would you bring it into a thread about BPC to support a statement that BPC and a low-carb diet will improve lipid panels?

    People who drink BPC are generally low carb. Low carbers will usually see improved lipid panels. I am not saying that BPC improves lipids. I am saying that LCHF diets generally improve lipids and that BPC can be a part of that diet.

    My original statement was in response to what I am guessing a very anti-low carb biased study on "evilsugarradio". Looks like woo to me based on all I have read and learned from theirs who eat low carb high fat. I will not go looking just to provide you with a quote. You'll have to take my word for it or do your own research.

    So, that's a no, then? You've never actually read anything that states, "Most people who are low carb and consume BPC have their lipid panel improve." Next time, if someone asks, just be honest and admit you made it up.

    ETA: https://www.yourlogicalfallacyis.com/burden-of-proof

    Never said I read that anywhere....
  • _Terrapin_
    _Terrapin_ Posts: 4,302 Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    Wetcoaster wrote: »
    http://www.evilsugarradio.com/episode-13-cholesterol-genetics-carbs-with-dr-spencer-nadolsky/127/

    Dr Spencer Nadolksy wrote a paper where he had done advanced blood lipid work on clients who were drinking Bullet Proof Coffee. Their blood work was terrible and returned to normal after they eliminated Bullet Proof Coffee.

    High fat with high carb is a less than ideal mix... Is that what people did there? Just add BPC to a normal diet?

    Most people who are low carb and consume BPC have their lipid panel improve...

    I assume that's a well researched statement and you're able to point us to your source material?

    The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Liing by Phinney and Volek, the Great Cholesterol Myth, Cholesterol Clarity by Moore, or Cholesterol Con.

    Low carb diets generally raise HDL, lower triglycerides, lower Lp-a, and leave LDL the same or slightly raise it but LDL will switch to the earthier pattern A type.

    BPC is a fine part of a low carb diet and can help contribute to improved lipids. I wouldn't advise mixing BPC with a big bagel or a stack of pancakes with lots of syrup. BPC is not magic, but as part of a low carb high fat diet it can be healthful.

    If the Great Cholesterol Myth was to be a source for BPC and improved lipid panels I couldn't find it in the book. In fact, in the 100+ pages of recipes and ingredients at the end of the book butter is referenced a whopping 4 times in the first 50 pages. 2 times as stand alone ingredients and 2 times as a substitute to EVOO. I haven't finished the other 50 pages but nowhere in the book does it reference BPC and improved lipid panels nor any reference to improved lipid panels and animal fat. It seems their book (Dr Bowden and Dr Sinatra) follow similar recipes as a book by Dr Esselsytn( Cleveland Clinic physician).

    Also, in terms of improved lipid panels you'd have to (1) have a panel done and (2) post dietary change have another one completed. I find it very odd that people would randomly have lipid panels completed prior to taking on a low carb diet. I am not sure how many people actively have lipid panels done as part of blood work prior to a cardiac event but it would seem odd to request something beyond the breakdown of cholesterol and a conversation of the ratios of LDL, HDL, an tri's.

    Last, in terms of HDL improvement on a low carb diet folks with chronic diseases, ie rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes, have a very different HDL than HDL of healthy individuals. Some 'good' HDL cholesterol reduces inflammation while the dysfunctional HDL does not. So, according to Dr Angelo Scanu the recommendation is to ask your doctor about good v. bad HDL when your HDL improves and you have pre-existing conditions. Elevated HDL and a low carb diet may not be the panacea people believe it to be. This is on pps.50-51 from the Great Choleslterol Myth. I think it helps people when we make declarative statements to provide accurate source information and if possible the pages to save other people time trying to research this information.

    Healthy in the context above: People devoid of RA and diabetes.


  • spoonyspork
    spoonyspork Posts: 238 Member
    Eh. I think butter in coffee tastes 'okay', though you have to use a lot more of it than regular creamer to really have a 'lightening' effect on coffee. It works in a pinch, when you have no milk or cream or even non-dairy creamer. I don't find it particularly oily - no more than heavy cream. Never thought of it as being healthy and was totally confused when it started getting popular.

    I just picture someone having a beau/belle over and having some morning after breakfast (you know, the stereotypical waffles and juice and whatever). But: oh no! Nothing to cook! And to make matters worse: not even any cream for coffee! Quick panicked search... hmm... coconut oil and... butter! So they convince their guest it's super healthy and a great breakfast replacement and blahblahblah. And, it's not bad! The guest is impressed, starts spreading it around...
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
    The guest is impressed, starts spreading it around...

    .... via SMS from your bathroom asking mutual friends to drop by, after stopping for imodium.
  • nchrty
    nchrty Posts: 57 Member
    Clarewho wrote: »
    Sounds disgusting, I can't think of any good reason to do it. Coffee is an appetite suppressant and fat can make you feel fuller longer. Together maybe they have super-filling qualities? But for the calories in that tbsp of butter I can think of much more tasty alternatives :)

    Totally agree.
  • Dovekat
    Dovekat Posts: 263 Member
    I have had it and do have it from time to time because it tastes good and fills me up when I am in mad rush. Use good quality ingredients so it's rich creamy and frothy. I add 1 TBS Anchor unsalted butter, 1 TBS raw coconut oil 2 TBS double cream (helps prevent oil slick top) some ginger and cinnamon powder then blend it all together.
  • Ecarney80
    Ecarney80 Posts: 3 Member
    I have a customer (i work in a coffee shop) who has butter in his coffee all the time. He says it improves on the flavour, personally I think it's disgusting!
  • _Terrapin_
    _Terrapin_ Posts: 4,302 Member
    Ecarney80 wrote: »
    I have a customer (i work in a coffee shop) who has butter in his coffee all the time. He says it improves on the flavour, personally I think it's disgusting!
    Does your shop offer the butter or does the customer bring their own butter?