Binge eaters out there needing support

12346

Replies

  • Myheartstrue
    Myheartstrue Posts: 5 Member
    I would like to add you I am also battling binge eating, and would love support. I havent figured out how to add people yet new to MFP.
  • Lam3ro58
    Lam3ro58 Posts: 2 Member
    Hi,my name is Bob, and I know where your coming from I've had a problem with binge eating all my life and because of it I've experience many health problems Like Lymphodema,(swelling of the lower llim
  • msdaniellesmith
    msdaniellesmith Posts: 2 Member
    Im new to MFP and I definitely am a binge eater. Last night was my first time being successful in not indulging. I've definitely experienced those regretful days. Is it weird that they usually happen on weekends?
  • ziesergirl_66
    ziesergirl_66 Posts: 955 Member
    edited March 2016
    newmeadow wrote: »
    How can people consistently binge and not gain weight? It surprises me to see binge eaters at a healthy weight.

    My own experience....when I'm in my binge mode (weeks, months, years) I am 30-40 lbs heavier, and will maintain that weight give or take 5-10 lbs. My body gets used to those calories (3,000 -7,000) and my activity level stays the same.

    When I am NOT bingeing, (eating 1200 - 1600 cals a day) I am 30-40 lbs lighter, which usually means I am restricting..not so much calories, but certain foods. The idea of a 'new habit is formed in 3 weeks or 30 days', does not ring true for me. I have done very well....say 4 mos, 8 mos at a time, over many, many years. Then I slip back into horrible habits, same previous habits that have plagued me for over 20 yrs. It's a vicious cycle. And even when I am 30-40 lbs lighter, I am still NOT at a healthy weight. Maybe mid-high end of over weight.

    cross2bear above has a very good point. It's an emotion to the food. If you can stop yourself, in the very moment of that awful 'urge' to binge, know exactly **what** it is that you are feeling, thinking, whatever is happening, you will be closer to getting answers to the WHY. It's not easy, but you have to be fully aware. It will shed some light on your behavior. If you truly want to end it, you will keep trying til you figure it out. And....there is absolutely nothing wrong with getting help either. It's actually brave.
  • ab6046
    ab6046 Posts: 371 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    How can people consistently binge and not gain weight? It surprises me to see binge eaters at a healthy weight.

    Yeah seems a little...odd. Something else may be at play here and I don't relate. Binge or not, I chew and swallow what I eat. Then I allow it to completely digest and be excreted from my body. The natural way.

    Yeah but binging is a behavior, and not a weight. Everyone has to start somewhere. As someone in a previous post mentioned, they had anorexia and started binging during that time. Someone can have horrendous binges and be underweight. Obviously binging consistently is usually going to result in weight gain, but depending where you're at in terms of weight in the beginning it may or may not lead to being overweight. And you're right, there are plenty of people who engage in compensatory behaviors to try to balance their binges such as restricting.
  • bologna111
    bologna111 Posts: 57 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    ab6046 wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    How can people consistently binge and not gain weight? It surprises me to see binge eaters at a healthy weight.

    Yeah seems a little...odd. Something else may be at play here and I don't relate. Binge or not, I chew and swallow what I eat. Then I allow it to completely digest and be excreted from my body. The natural way.

    Yeah but binging is a behavior, and not a weight. Everyone has to start somewhere. As someone in a previous post mentioned, they had anorexia and started binging during that time. Someone can have horrendous binges and be underweight. Obviously binging consistently is usually going to result in weight gain, but depending where you're at in terms of weight in the beginning it may or may not lead to being overweight. And you're right, there are plenty of people who engage in compensatory behaviors to try to balance their binges such as restricting.

    True, but if the behavior has yet to show the consequences - like huge weight gain in proportion to huge binges (which are not purged in one way or another) - I'd say it has yet to have become a significant problem. My posts, and the support and feelz I've offered thus far, are directed at the bingers who have suffered the natural consequences of prolonged and serious binging - which is serious weight gain. As for those who manage to binge regularly and not get fat? I don't know what the problem is and I don't think there is one. There are people who enjoy going on a wild feast now and then but remain at a healthy weight. Boo hoo.

    There are more consequences then just weight gain. The feeling of loss of control, guilt, self hatred just to name few. Plus there are other physical consequences like headaches, severe digestive issues, etc.
    binge eating is awful even at a healthy weight.
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,468 Member
    I'm just now seeing this thread. I wouldn't call myself a "binge eater" because that means a specific event of over-eating, right? I just have an insatiable appetite. I always have and probably always will. So for the first couple years of weight loss, I would starve myself and allow a "cheat day" when I reached certain mileposts. The "cheat days" would still get logged, but I would not restrict myself. I would just eat what I wanted and as much as I wanted (like the good old days before trying to lose weight). These days would range from 18K-30K calories and would set me back a bit. Then for several months, I would go hungry to lose the weight gain from my cheat day plus to get to the next milestone.

    For the last few months, I've fallen off the wagon and have been restricting too little. I might eat 5K calories, or maybe 8K-10K, but all of those mean weight gain. Some days I would fight the hunger and eat at a deficit, but it takes a lot of those days to erase a single day of only mild restriction. I've been trying to get back into the swing of things this week since I gained 6 lbs. last week with 3 days of only partially restricting intake.

    I've tried some of the normal tricks - high protein intake, lots of veggies (early on, there was once that I ate 11 lbs. of salad and was still hungry for foods that actually taste good), lots of water... I haven't yet found anything that works. I'm open to new ideas, though, if anyone has them. I do have type 1 diabetes, and one of the often untreated issues with that is that I make no amylin. I might talk to my endocrinologist about trying that. When a prescription version of amylin first came out (Symlin), it caused extreme nausea and vomiting, so I stopped after a couple months.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,697 Member
    edited March 2016
    How can people consistently binge and not gain weight? It surprises me to see binge eaters at a healthy weight. In order for that to happen it seems one would have to restrict food on other days or exercise a lot to make up for it. Is it possible the restricting of food is leading to the binge? I binge from time to time but gain every ounce of it. The weight gain is what helps to control the binges but if there is no weight gain I can understand how difficult it would be to stop.

    How can people consistently binge and not gain weight?

    1. They are not consistently binging - they have restrict and binge cycles
    2. They binge and purge and/or overexercise
    3. Their idea of binging includes much less calories than yours does
  • ab6046
    ab6046 Posts: 371 Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    bologna111 wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    ab6046 wrote: »
    newmeadow wrote: »
    How can people consistently binge and not gain weight? It surprises me to see binge eaters at a healthy weight.

    Yeah seems a little...odd. Something else may be at play here and I don't relate. Binge or not, I chew and swallow what I eat. Then I allow it to completely digest and be excreted from my body. The natural way.

    Yeah but binging is a behavior, and not a weight. Everyone has to start somewhere. As someone in a previous post mentioned, they had anorexia and started binging during that time. Someone can have horrendous binges and be underweight. Obviously binging consistently is usually going to result in weight gain, but depending where you're at in terms of weight in the beginning it may or may not lead to being overweight. And you're right, there are plenty of people who engage in compensatory behaviors to try to balance their binges such as restricting.

    True, but if the behavior has yet to show the consequences - like huge weight gain in proportion to huge binges (which are not purged in one way or another) - I'd say it has yet to have become a significant problem. My posts, and the support and feelz I've offered thus far, are directed at the bingers who have suffered the natural consequences of prolonged and serious binging - which is serious weight gain. As for those who manage to binge regularly and not get fat? I don't know what the problem is and I don't think there is one. There are people who enjoy going on a wild feast now and then but remain at a healthy weight. Boo hoo.

    There are more consequences then just weight gain. The feeling of loss of control, guilt, self hatred just to name few. Plus there are other physical consequences like headaches, severe digestive issues, etc.
    binge eating is awful even at a healthy weight.

    Seriously? That list is for beginners. Morbid obesity, and the physical and mental symptoms associated with that condition is the end result of long term classic bingeing. Major depressive disorder, crippling anxiety, congestive heart failure, respiratory distress, fatty liver disease, kidney disease, physical immobility, knee and hip replacement surgeries, diabetes, neuropathy, blindness, amputation - and the list goes on and on.

    Once again, regular "bingeing" results in regular weight gain. And it doesn't take long, in a bingeing lifestyle, to get really fat.

    People who are dedicated to controlling their weight while regularly "bingeing" typically use oral diuretics, laxatives, forced vomiting, or spend 8 hours a day running on a treadmill. Bingers who use these methods to control their weight have serious problems. Like permanent heart and kidney damage that there's no coming back from. And I want nothing to do with that territory, nor will I discuss it here or anywhere else. I'm not saying anyone here is doing that, but if they're bingeing and not gaining weight, they're either not really bingeing or they're not bingeing often enough for them to wear the results of their binges. Or there's another problem. One that is too severe for discussion on a board like MFP, in my opinion.

    Sigh. I've been sucked into a thread full of people of healthy weight who claim to be "bingers" it seems. My bad and I should have known better. The discussion boards are littered with this.

    I'm out.

    My purpose in starting this thread was for any and all individuals who engage in binge eating to be able to get support. Even if they aren't doing it on a daily basis, and even if they aren't obese. It's pretty clear that reading through this thread, what people consider to be a binge varies wildly. I am sorry that you are upset, and I will leave this subject alone but I do want to say just a couple more things:

    -First, you seem to be assuming that everyone on here is of a healthy weight. My guess is peoples' weights probably vary quite a bit.
    -Again, everyone has to start somewhere. I agree that if someone binges regularly they will gain weight very quickly. But also, someone can start binge eating at 100 pounds and not technically be overweight for a while, even if they are gaining extremely rapidly. Bad habits develop at all weights.

    I really don't like confrontation and I was hoping this thread wouldn't turn into something negative, since it seems there are many people out there who feel they need support. I'm sorry that this thread was not what you were looking for. All the best.
  • ab6046
    ab6046 Posts: 371 Member
    Bump
  • jigglyjessica
    jigglyjessica Posts: 58 Member
    I am trying to allow "bad" foods in daily if they fit my calories like today I had 10 mini peanut butter cups. A binge for me is probably 2000+ calories in a sitting usually so it's horrible, I would eat a whole pot of white rice with oil and two tubs of ice cream and a favorite was two bags of bagels with butter. I try to not eat in my room by myself anymore because I have been a secret eater/binger. Definitely not passed it but hoping to get a good streak of non bingeing days.
  • ab6046
    ab6046 Posts: 371 Member
    Bump
  • ab6046
    ab6046 Posts: 371 Member
    Bump again!
  • KrissaJane92
    KrissaJane92 Posts: 33 Member
    I am definitely a binge eater. It takes a toll on me; physically AND mentally. Started as a child, now Im almost 24 and trying to get it under control.
  • Wicked_Seraph
    Wicked_Seraph Posts: 388 Member
    Two things have helped immensely in controlling this:

    MFP and running.

    MFP forces me to be accountable for what I'm eating - and there's been MANY times where I don't eat a "trigger" food because it's either not worth the calories, or because the hassle of weighing and logging it is more effort than I'm willing to put forth. It also forces me to be realistic. Seeing that it's okay to have a "bad" day once in a while - because overall, I'm still losing - helps with the guilt and sense of failure that can often send one into a tailspin of future binges.

    Running also helps. It gives me a goal to work towards and feel good about. I've found a pattern between running and generally good habits about exercise and binging. When I'm unable to exercise or run - perhaps I have an injury, I'm busy, I'm sick - I tend to be MUCH more prone to buying and gorging on those trigger foods. Exercise makes me feel more in-control of myself and my life. I tend to find myself thinking about running, and looking forward to that, rather than obsessing over food. It doesn't hurt that running tends to curb my appetite a bit!

    In both cases - it's all about giving yourself control. Binging makes us feel powerless. Find something that makes you feel powerFUL, and in control of yourself. Don't feel horrible if you have a day where you eat over your calories - just acknowledge that it happens and move on. :smile:
  • betuel75
    betuel75 Posts: 776 Member
    I also binge eat sometimes. It seems mental for me. I had never had this problem my whole life until i figured out how to count calories and get to super lean levels. It seams that once i set my mind to it, i dont care anymore, im eating everything in sight and no matter how hard i try i cant break it for the entire day. Sometimes i wake up the next morning and continue. Even though i know im going to put on a layer of body fat as a result, i still cant stop and i tell myself "oh well, i'll fix it in the next week or two". Again its mental, for some reason i mentally tell myself i dont care and will eat all the things i usually dont. For me its also like i'll have to eat everything i deprive myself of on as regular basis. But even if i bring these things into the house that i would binge on and tell myself i will have a portion of this so i dont deprive myself of this and therefore binge on it i still end up eating the entire thing of whatever it is when the binge hits. Example is peanut butter or nuts. I buy a jar or bag of nuts and eat a little portioned out to say im not depriving myself of this but when the binge hits i will then finish the whole jar or bag of nuts so now i just dont keep them in the house. It sucks but i have to do it this way...
  • shaybee377
    shaybee377 Posts: 42 Member
    I'm so happy I found this thread. I'm currently coming off of a really bad binge from yesterday and I'm not feeling too great about myself... I've been struggling with this for almost 10 years, and I am sick and tired of feeling this way. All of you feel free to add me!
  • aimeemarie150
    aimeemarie150 Posts: 353 Member
    Posting here for support. Falling back into my binge-eating habits slowly for the last 6 months, and I know it's wrong but right now I'm too weak to stop myself. Full on admitting it. Haven't exercised in a while due to surgery, but I also feel like poo because of the binging. My fiance supports my eating but he's at a loss for when I get mad when he tells me not to eat more... needing support please.
  • healthykaitlin
    healthykaitlin Posts: 91 Member
    I have been a binge eater for as long as I can remember. my parents recount stories of when I was little & something would hurt my feelings at the dinner table, I would instantly snap & start shoveling my food into my mouth to a point where I wasn't even tasting it. Unfortunately, it wasn't something my parents thought of as a real issue, just a lack of willpower. I carried the issue into adulthood. My most recent binge was last Saturday, after an evening that included a few drinks I came home & ate half a packet of Razzles & a pint of M&m ice cream. I felt so shameful the next morning, which is why I generally try to avoid alcohol because the smallest amount will set off that old habit. That was my first time binging in a month & I'm hoping my next run will be much longer. I portion everything out, take pictures of everything I eat... I'm also on generic Prozac, my doctor said that if we addressed my depression, I would probably find myself binging less which has obviously worked thus far. Good luck to you all
  • RespectTheKitty
    RespectTheKitty Posts: 1,670 Member
    Two things have helped immensely in controlling this:

    MFP and running.

    MFP forces me to be accountable for what I'm eating - and there's been MANY times where I don't eat a "trigger" food because it's either not worth the calories, or because the hassle of weighing and logging it is more effort than I'm willing to put forth. It also forces me to be realistic. Seeing that it's okay to have a "bad" day once in a while - because overall, I'm still losing - helps with the guilt and sense of failure that can often send one into a tailspin of future binges.

    Running also helps. It gives me a goal to work towards and feel good about. I've found a pattern between running and generally good habits about exercise and binging. When I'm unable to exercise or run - perhaps I have an injury, I'm busy, I'm sick - I tend to be MUCH more prone to buying and gorging on those trigger foods. Exercise makes me feel more in-control of myself and my life. I tend to find myself thinking about running, and looking forward to that, rather than obsessing over food. It doesn't hurt that running tends to curb my appetite a bit!

    In both cases - it's all about giving yourself control. Binging makes us feel powerless. Find something that makes you feel powerFUL, and in control of yourself. Don't feel horrible if you have a day where you eat over your calories - just acknowledge that it happens and move on. :smile:

    This. So much this.

    MFP has been a huge help in getting my binges under control, because it makes me accountable for everything I put in my mouth. Seeing it all out there in front of me makes me much less likely to give in to something that doesn't fit my calorie goal. And, regular exercise, especially running, helps regulate my mood and keep it much more stable than before, so I'm less likely to be in a state of mind where I want to binge.