Carbs in fruit and weightloss... advice needed

Okay, so I never seem to get my macros right as my carbs are always around 80%. For breakfast I have oatmeal or semolina so that uses up a lot of my carbs. Then during dinner I will have some kind of grain or rice. I don't eat bread or pasta BUT i eat a lot of fruit which makes me go over the limit. I always snack on bananas and apples when I'm out and about, but could this be making weightloss slower and cause bloating? Should I stick to 1 piece of fruit a day regardless of them being considered healthy?
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Replies

  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    Are you logging correctly - do you use a food scale, check every entry for errors, use the recipe builder when cooking, log everything? What is your calorie goal? How active are you? Do you eat meat, fish, eggs, beans and dairy? Butter, oils, nuts and seeds?

    Do you feel healthy and energetic? Hungry or tired?

    Weight loss slows down when your calorie deficit is too small. Bloating, well, I'm not too sure it's a thing. Everybody seems to bloat these days.

    If you think that you eat too much fruit, so that it's hard to get in all the nutrition you need while staying in a deficit, you could try to moderate intake. 2-3 pieces per day is usually considered reasonable.
  • azulvioleta6
    azulvioleta6 Posts: 4,169 Member
    edited August 2016
    Woah that is a lot of carbs!

    Maybe a good way to look at it is to select the carby foods that come with the most nutrition and to eliminate or avoid the ones that are less nutritionally dense. So, in general, your priorities might be:

    1. non-starchy vegetables (greens, etc.)
    2. somewhat starchy vegetables which also have a lot of fiber and vitamins (things like sweet potatoes, tomatoes*)
    3. legumes (black beans, kidney beans, garbanzos, etc.)
    4. low GI and/or high-fiber fruits (cherries, blackberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    5. whole grains (old-fashioned oats, etc.)
    6. very starchy vegetables with little redeeming nutrition (white potatoes, corn**)
    7. high GI/low fiber/high sugar fruits (especially tropical fruits, particularly bananas)
    8. very processed grains (semolina, white flour, pasta, bread)

    *of course this is technically a fruit
    **actually grain

    You could also make a couple of small changes and likely still meet the standard macros without completely eliminating fruit. For example, if you had an omelette for breakfast instead of semolina and switched a banana for a cup of blackberries, that might work.

    Think about intentionally focusing on protein too instead of just about avoiding carbs.

    I eat a moderate-to-low carb diet and am still able to fit in *some* fruit. Try pre-tracking your whole day to see what fits together.
  • vetkoek11
    vetkoek11 Posts: 2 Member
    edited August 2016
    Im a carb junky but keep my fruit to 2-3 portions a day. I don't touch potatoes (except sweet potatoes) bread or pasta but have moderate amounts of quinoa, bulgur wheat, brown rice and barley - never more than 2 portions a day and usually just one about 125grams cooked. My hubby and I are both type 2's so we are quite careful with the carbs but even 2 months into the Blood Sugar Diet, I still crave fruit but luckily not sweets so much any more. I struggle to eat more protein, which would help as it keeps you fuller for longer. We eat a little chicken, fish, greek yogurt, plenty of eggs, beans and lentils, lots of veg in every colour. I have found that logging every gram of food on this site keeps me well within my daily allowances and for the first time in over 30 years of dieting, I am never going hungry and have not gone over my allowance in these 2 months. I've lost 18kg and my hubby 12kg ... in 8 weeks! Carbs really are so tempting, delicious and addictive! Good luck in winning the war!
  • tequila5000
    tequila5000 Posts: 128 Member
    I don't think there is anything wrong with 80% carbs, if you are feeling ok and meeting your weight loss goals. It's about CICO, and there are an infinite # of combinations variations with that.

    I've dropped over 50 pounds. I usually eat 3 whole fruits for breakfast. Lunch is often baked potato, beans, veggies. Dinner is often rice and veggies, or salad and pasta. I love love love carbs and it makes me feel good to eat them. If I eat fatty foods, lots of meat, I just feel yucky and uncomfortable.

    There is no one size fits all. I believe each person must experiment with different macro % variations to find out what works for them as far as achieving any desired weight loss, what makes them feel good, and what they can maintain long term.

    Just my 2 cents.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,257 Member
    While losing weight, it helped me to review my diary regularly (every day or two) and look for foods that were contributing significant calories, but that weren't worth the calories to me in terms of their nutrition, satiating effect, or tastiness. Then I'd reduce my eating of those, and increase something I enjoy that better met my goals. Gradually, my way of eating became more nutritious and satisfying.

    If you're hitting your calories, that's what counts for weight loss. If you're eating high-carb foods in a way that sacrifices nutrition (especially protein, healthy fat, micronutrients, or fiber), that might be a reason to make some changes.

    Many people find protein, fat, or higher-volume (usually higher fiber) foods more satiating, so replacing some lower value carbs with foods that hit those targets can pay off in both nutrition and satiation.

    For me, one light bulb that went off was that I'd been using pasta, grain or bread products to add volume to my meals, but that for me personally those didn't have a lot of nutrition/satiation/tastiness value. So, instead I mainly dropped those out & ate what I would've put on/beside the pasta/grain, or inside the bread - maybe ramping up the veggies a bit - and was happy with the result. YMMV.
  • SusanMFindlay
    SusanMFindlay Posts: 1,804 Member
    edited August 2016
    The main problem I see with 80% carbs is that the three things that make you feel full are fat, protein and fibre. Aren't you hungry a lot?

    Left to my own devices, I tend to eat a lot of carbs, but even then I wouldn't be as high as 80%. Whole grains do have fat and protein in them. Are you eating whole grains or are you eating the white versions (which tend to have had much of the fibre, fat and protein removed)?

    What I've found is that to get my fat and protein up to 20-30% each, I have to make a real effort. Tricks I've used include almond butter on toast at breakfast (since I don't like peanut butter), and avocados (either in a salad or sliced on Wasa/Ryvita topped with either sun dried tomatoes or garlic powder). I have also been known to snack on tuna (either as-is or on toast or a cracker) to boost fat and protein or scrambled eggs. At first, these things felt weird to do, but they're very tasty and I got used to them. Now I really enjoy them.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    edited August 2016
    I don't think that carbohydrates, in and of themselves, are a problem. But someone eating 80% of their calories in carbohydrates is going to struggle to meet their needs for protein and fat. Can you swap some of the fruit out for other things or swap out some of the grains you're eating at dinner for beans (or another protein source)?

    Even if a food is healthy, it doesn't mean much if it is crowding out other things that you need.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,971 Member
    edited August 2016
    crevtion wrote: »
    Okay, so I never seem to get my macros right as my carbs are always around 80%. For breakfast I have oatmeal or semolina so that uses up a lot of my carbs. Then during dinner I will have some kind of grain or rice. I don't eat bread or pasta BUT i eat a lot of fruit which makes me go over the limit. I always snack on bananas and apples when I'm out and about, but could this be making weightloss slower and cause bloating? Should I stick to 1 piece of fruit a day regardless of them being considered healthy?

    Focus on eating more protein and the carbs will take care of themselves. If you're an omnivore, eat more meat. If you're a vegetarian, eat more dairy and legumes. If you're a vegan, eat way more legumes.

    When I lived in vegetarian yoga communities I knew lots of fit vegans. They made legumes the backbone of their diet and never worried about carbs. And they ate lots of fruit too.
  • CasperNaegle
    CasperNaegle Posts: 936 Member
    Just cut back on carbs and add protein. You can lose weight with any calorie deficit and any macro balance, but I think you would find yourself feeling much better and maintain muscle much easier with a lot more protein. I run about 44% protein, 36% carbs, 20% fats
  • nowine4me
    nowine4me Posts: 3,986 Member
    Maybe trade a banana for a hard boiled egg and cut the oatmeal in half in the morning and add a Greek yogurt. Voila -- protein.
  • TishTash1616
    TishTash1616 Posts: 22 Member
    It probably won't really matter for weight loss, but can matter for other health factors.

    The World Health Organisation Expert Report on diet and chronic disease recommends that around 10-15% of calories come from protein, 15-30% of calories come from fat and 55-75% of calories come from carbohydrates.

    There's nothing wrong with eating a lot of carbs if it's what makes you feel satiated and gives you energy. You may want to incorporate more vegetables into your diet, particular the green and leafy varieties, as well as some legumes and pulses to give your diet more nutritional variety.
  • gonetothedogs19
    gonetothedogs19 Posts: 325 Member
    It probably won't really matter for weight loss, but can matter for other health factors.

    The World Health Organisation Expert Report on diet and chronic disease recommends that around 10-15% of calories come from protein, 15-30% of calories come from fat and 55-75% of calories come from carbohydrates.

    There's nothing wrong with eating a lot of carbs if it's what makes you feel satiated and gives you energy. You may want to incorporate more vegetables into your diet, particular the green and leafy varieties, as well as some legumes and pulses to give your diet more nutritional variety.

    The World Health Organization has no idea what it is talking about. You can eat all the fat you want within your caloric boundaries. Fat does not make you fat. Repeat - fat does not make you fat. And lots of people like fat for weight loss because it provides more satiety than pasta and bread.
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    Thanks for the replies! I'm trying to figure out how to increase my protein, as I'm allergic to dairy. I looked at some vegan recipies but a lot use soy which I am even more allergic to. It might take some time to find what's right for me but I'm trying to get there nonetheless
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,257 Member
    crevtion wrote: »
    Thanks for the replies! I'm trying to figure out how to increase my protein, as I'm allergic to dairy. I looked at some vegan recipies but a lot use soy which I am even more allergic to. It might take some time to find what's right for me but I'm trying to get there nonetheless

    If you're vegetarian, and unable to eat dairy or soy, I'm sorry to say that this makes things much more difficult. (I've been ovo-lacto vegetarian for over 42 years, so don't take this as trashing vegetarianism or even veganism - both are doable in a very healthy & nutrient-rich manner, but needing to avoid soy is dropping out one very common and high-quality protein source).

    Are you able to eat gluten? If so, seitan might help. Are you able to eat legumes other than soy? If so, consider those, and look into chickpea pasta. Some veggies have a bit of protein; seek those out and eat them. How about nuts and seeds? They're quite high in calories, but can be used in reasonable portions even in calorie deficit, and many bring along healthy fats and other nutrition benefits. Some 'ancient grains' (quinoa is one) have a bit more protein than rice or regular pasta/bread, if you're still eating those. Personally, I don't care for protein powders, but they might be a good answer for you, given dietary restrictions.

    Obviously, if you're not striving to be some type of veg*an, then fish/meat are good choices.

    One source I've found extremely helpful is the spreadsheet described & linked in this thread in the MFP forums:

    Carbs and Fats are cheap. Here's a Guide to getting your PROTEIN's worth. Fiber also...

    The spreadsheet lists the most calorie-efficient sources of protein. If you're avoiding meat/fish/dairy/soy, don't be discouraged if you see lots of that at the top of the list - keep scrolling, and you'll find other sources. Then look for higher-calorie items in your diary that you can replace with some of the more protein-rich foods from the list that you personally enjoy eating.

    Good luck!
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    crevtion wrote: »
    Thanks for the replies! I'm trying to figure out how to increase my protein, as I'm allergic to dairy. I looked at some vegan recipies but a lot use soy which I am even more allergic to. It might take some time to find what's right for me but I'm trying to get there nonetheless

    If you're vegetarian, and unable to eat dairy or soy, I'm sorry to say that this makes things much more difficult. (I've been ovo-lacto vegetarian for over 42 years, so don't take this as trashing vegetarianism or even veganism - both are doable in a very healthy & nutrient-rich manner, but needing to avoid soy is dropping out one very common and high-quality protein source).

    Are you able to eat gluten? If so, seitan might help. Are you able to eat legumes other than soy? If so, consider those, and look into chickpea pasta. Some veggies have a bit of protein; seek those out and eat them. How about nuts and seeds? They're quite high in calories, but can be used in reasonable portions even in calorie deficit, and many bring along healthy fats and other nutrition benefits. Some 'ancient grains' (quinoa is one) have a bit more protein than rice or regular pasta/bread, if you're still eating those. Personally, I don't care for protein powders, but they might be a good answer for you, given dietary restrictions.

    Obviously, if you're not striving to be some type of veg*an, then fish/meat are good choices.

    One source I've found extremely helpful is the spreadsheet described & linked in this thread in the MFP forums:

    Carbs and Fats are cheap. Here's a Guide to getting your PROTEIN's worth. Fiber also...

    The spreadsheet lists the most calorie-efficient sources of protein. If you're avoiding meat/fish/dairy/soy, don't be discouraged if you see lots of that at the top of the list - keep scrolling, and you'll find other sources. Then look for higher-calorie items in your diary that you can replace with some of the more protein-rich foods from the list that you personally enjoy eating.

    Good luck!

    Thanks so much for such a helpful reply! I think I didn't explain myself properly. I'm not vegetarian or vegan but since vegans don't eat dairy I thought to incorporate aspects of their diet into mine. I will have a look at the things you have mentioned!!
  • hjlourenshj
    hjlourenshj Posts: 66 Member
    The main problem I see with 80% carbs is that the three things that make you feel full are fat, protein and fibre. Aren't you hungry a lot?

    Left to my own devices, I tend to eat a lot of carbs, but even then I wouldn't be as high as 80%. Whole grains do have fat and protein in them. Are you eating whole grains or are you eating the white versions (which tend to have had much of the fibre, fat and protein removed)?

    What I've found is that to get my fat and protein up to 20-30% each, I have to make a real effort. Tricks I've used include almond butter on toast at breakfast (since I don't like peanut butter), and avocados (either in a salad or sliced on Wasa/Ryvita topped with either sun dried tomatoes or garlic powder). I have also been known to snack on tuna (either as-is or on toast or a cracker) to boost fat and protein or scrambled eggs. At first, these things felt weird to do, but they're very tasty and I got used to them. Now I really enjoy them.

    fiber are carbs

  • shumm090
    shumm090 Posts: 23 Member
    crevtion wrote: »
    Thanks for the replies! I'm trying to figure out how to increase my protein, as I'm allergic to dairy. I looked at some vegan recipies but a lot use soy which I am even more allergic to. It might take some time to find what's right for me but I'm trying to get there nonetheless

    I'm allergic to both dairy and soy too. Feel free to friend me and you can peak at my diary. Generally my macro ratios I strive for are 40 carb, 30 protein, 30 fat. I also eat a lot of fruit but a lot of my protein comes from eggs and fish. I incorporate a lot of veggies as snacks to help keep me full.
  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    Here's a non-exhaustive list of protein-rich foods. See if there's something(s) in here that you like and can eat - and eat more of those things.

    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/926789
  • Tsumter2013
    Tsumter2013 Posts: 7 Member
    It probably won't really matter for weight loss, but can matter for other health factors.

    The World Health Organisation Expert Report on diet and chronic disease recommends that around 10-15% of calories come from protein, 15-30% of calories come from fat and 55-75% of calories come from carbohydrates.

    There's nothing wrong with eating a lot of carbs if it's what makes you feel satiated and gives you energy. You may want to incorporate more vegetables into your diet, particular the green and leafy varieties, as well as some legumes and pulses to give your diet more nutritional variety.

    :'( The World Health Organization has no idea what it is talking about. You can eat all the fat you want within your caloric boundaries. Fat does not make you fat. Repeat - fat does not make you fat. And lots of people like fat for weight loss because it provides more satiety than pasta and bread.

    But but but they're the world HEALTH organization. The recommendations they set come from leading experts in the field. I'd trust their recommendations over the USDA. Specifically UNsaturated fats help.