Weight loss surgery or NO?

13

Replies

  • cerise_noir
    cerise_noir Posts: 5,468 Member
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    I have been struggling with my weight for years. I am a yo yo dieter. In order for insurance to cover my weight loss surgery, I need to gain 25 pounds. Should I do this? Has anyone had the sugery done? What are the pros and cons? I am capable of losing weight. I have lost 80 pounds in 2010 only to gain it back. It just seems like the older I get, the harder it is to lose.
    Um. No. Don't gain weight just to spend copious amounts of money on the surgery and healing afterwards.

    Use myfitnesspal, weigh all your food and log everything every day. You can do this.


    This post reminds me of the Simpsons episode where Homer had to gain weight to work at home....and work in a mumu...
    "I just came to see 'honk if you're horny' in peace!!!" Not making fun of you, OP, not at all....I was just reminded, that's all.

  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,427 Member
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    I have been struggling with my weight for years. I am a yo yo dieter. In order for insurance to cover my weight loss surgery, I need to gain 25 pounds. Should I do this? Has anyone had the sugery done? What are the pros and cons? I am capable of losing weight. I have lost 80 pounds in 2010 only to gain it back. It just seems like the older I get, the harder it is to lose.

    I would not in your situation.
    Set a reasonable weight loss goal like 1 lb a week and get a calorie goal with MFP. Don't eliminate all the foods you like or overly restrict your diet. Log everything as accurately as you can. Be patient.
    If you are an emotional eater deal with that. Work on developing non-food ways to deal with stress and emotions.
  • jennyc777
    jennyc777 Posts: 10 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    I have been struggling with my weight for years. I am a yo yo dieter. In order for insurance to cover my weight loss surgery, I need to gain 25 pounds. Should I do this? Has anyone had the sugery done? What are the pros and cons? I am capable of losing weight. I have lost 80 pounds in 2010 only to gain it back. It just seems like the older I get, the harder it is to lose.

    So, you know how to lose weight, the issue is not getting complacent and putting it back on. As many have shared, WLS won't help with that.

    How old are you? You look like you're in your 30s in your profile picture. Paging @middlehaitch who has successfully lost weight in her 60s.

    I am 43 years old. I'm just frustrated with not losing very fast. I have pcos and pre-diabetic.
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,631 Member
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    I have been struggling with my weight for years. I am a yo yo dieter. In order for insurance to cover my weight loss surgery, I need to gain 25 pounds. Should I do this? Has anyone had the sugery done? What are the pros and cons? I am capable of losing weight. I have lost 80 pounds in 2010 only to gain it back. It just seems like the older I get, the harder it is to lose.

    So, you know how to lose weight, the issue is not getting complacent and putting it back on. As many have shared, WLS won't help with that.

    How old are you? You look like you're in your 30s in your profile picture. Paging @middlehaitch who has successfully lost weight in her 60s.

    I am 43 years old. I'm just frustrated with not losing very fast. I have pcos and pre-diabetic.

    A dietitian could definitely help you if you can get to one. A specific diet can help with both problems. Do you take meds for your PCOS?
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,584 Member
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    I have been struggling with my weight for years. I am a yo yo dieter. In order for insurance to cover my weight loss surgery, I need to gain 25 pounds. Should I do this? Has anyone had the sugery done? What are the pros and cons? I am capable of losing weight. I have lost 80 pounds in 2010 only to gain it back. It just seems like the older I get, the harder it is to lose.

    So, you know how to lose weight, the issue is not getting complacent and putting it back on. As many have shared, WLS won't help with that.

    How old are you? You look like you're in your 30s in your profile picture. Paging @middlehaitch who has successfully lost weight in her 60s.

    I am 43 years old. I'm just frustrated with not losing very fast. I have pcos and pre-diabetic.

    There's a PCOS group here: http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/group/3070-p-c-o-sis

    Many (but not all) women with PCOS here say reducing or going low carb helped them.

    My girlfriend was happy with the results she got by working with an endocrinologist, taking Metformin, and reducing carbs.
  • Bearbo27
    Bearbo27 Posts: 339 Member
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    I have been struggling with my weight for years. I am a yo yo dieter. In order for insurance to cover my weight loss surgery, I need to gain 25 pounds. Should I do this? Has anyone had the sugery done? What are the pros and cons? I am capable of losing weight. I have lost 80 pounds in 2010 only to gain it back. It just seems like the older I get, the harder it is to lose.

    So, you know how to lose weight, the issue is not getting complacent and putting it back on. As many have shared, WLS won't help with that.

    How old are you? You look like you're in your 30s in your profile picture. Paging @middlehaitch who has successfully lost weight in her 60s.

    I am 43 years old. I'm just frustrated with not losing very fast. I have pcos and pre-diabetic.


    OP, I have PCOS and find more luck losing weight with a low carb diet. Talk with your dr and see if he/she can help you. Join the PCOS group here. Look for support and answers here, before you dive into major surgery. There are many woman around your age that will lose weight by just weighing and logging all food here on mfp.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    edited August 2016
    jennyc777 wrote: »
    I have been struggling with my weight for years. I am a yo yo dieter. In order for insurance to cover my weight loss surgery, I need to gain 25 pounds. Should I do this? Has anyone had the sugery done? What are the pros and cons? I am capable of losing weight. I have lost 80 pounds in 2010 only to gain it back. It just seems like the older I get, the harder it is to lose.

    As to the part in bold: NO! Absolutely not. Why in the heck would you want to gain 25 pounds to have the weight loss surgery just to lose weight again? That can put your body through a lot of stress, not to mention the emotional toll.

    You have lost weight, you can do it again....and you can keep it off.

    I was obese until my 40's, overweight until my 50's and now I'm at a normal BMI. If I can do it without weight loss surgery, anybody can...you can too.

    My SIL had weight loss surgery and said if she had it to do over again, she wouldn't do it. By the way, she has gained a good amount of her weight back.





  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    @wwkwag, I encourage you to share more often. Loved what you had to say!
  • mom22dogs
    mom22dogs Posts: 470 Member
    I've known at least 7 people who had the surgery and every single one of them gained the weight back. You still need to learn proper eating / watch calories, etc. One friend, after her surgery, couldn't eat period. She threw up everything she tried to eat and had to have another surgery so she could eat small amounts. She got down to extremely thin - 10 years later, just as big as she ever was. Another one had the surgery, lost some weight, started drinking pop a few months after surgery, and didn't end up losing for very long, and she is also now back to square one.

    You need to just learn to control your portions/calories. To gain 25 lbs just so you can have surgery is insane.
  • happyfeetrebel1
    happyfeetrebel1 Posts: 1,004 Member
    I had a sleeve gastrectomy about 5 years ago. Went from 305 to 155 and have been maintaining for about 2 years

    I can eat whatever I want, no restrictions ( except carbonation). I do take supplements for vitamins, but I did before the surgery as I was anemic. I had no complications, have lost the weight, have more energy than I thought was possible. I ran my first 10 mile race !

    However, I also made a complete 180 lifestyle change. I focus on protein now, and voluntarily eat healthier than I ever did before.

    If I don't take care, I will gain. It's only a tool, and will fail if you let it. For me, it was the catalyst to change my life.
  • wwkwag
    wwkwag Posts: 60 Member
    @SLLRunner Thank You! I appreciate the kind words. I will definitely try to be more active on here and not such a lurker. LOL
  • musicathy
    musicathy Posts: 23 Member
    WLS is only a tool, and should be a last-resort tool at that. Given you've had success in the past, and don't qualify I would definitely say: don't adopt extra unhealthy habits just to be covered for surgery! That's like breaking your own nose to have a rhinoplasty!

    I would log meals here, cut calories, eat whole foods and exercise. It's not easy. But it's better than the risk and recovery involved with surgery - that will ultimately lead to you making those SAME changes.

    I know the position you're in. I didn't qualify for covered surgery so I forked over a huge amount of cash for lap band surgery, and it's honestly my only regret in life. I forked it over to a surgeon who cared about filling his wallet vs helping me get healthy. I had complications. Needed a second surgery. It had no impact on my hunger or weight. I got depressed as a result: gained more weight. I still have issues related to the surgery and here I am back at square one, doing things as I should have done before (and I had tried every stupid diet before). But now I'm focused on health. Eating the right foods (that took a while) and now my focus is on eating the right amount and moving more. Losing 2lbs/week now vs the only weight lost after surgery was during complications (couldn't eat, barely drink).

    At the end of the day you have to decide what's best for you and feel good about your decision. But that's my story! If you decide to work MFP, feel free to add me.
  • ericatoday
    ericatoday Posts: 454 Member
    edited August 2016
    After the surgery (my parents both have had it my mom gastric bypass and my dad the lap band) you have to eat small portions of healthy food and stick to it. Just how mfp asks you to do. If you dont you will still gain it back. My mom went from 280lbs and dropped down to a size 1 after about a year or 2 after she kept eating and started gaining it back and reached a size 9 and she wouldve kept gaining if she didnt pass. My dad got the lap band started around 260 and hes had it for years and is still 230 because he wont change what he eats. All my aunts have it to and they all gained most of it back because you need to change your mind set. If you have to gain to get it i say no. If you arent 600lbs and in dier need of it to live then you can do it. But you need to change you first.
  • HazyEyes93
    HazyEyes93 Posts: 89 Member
    Definitely NOT. I mean, typically you have to prove that you can even stick to healthy caloric consumption and lose weight to even qualify for surgery in the first place. Okay, so you lose weight and qualify for surgery. So, if you can LOSE weight without the surgery , why bother putting yourself through all of that pain and spending all of that money for something that you can do regardless of whether or not you've had part of your stomach removed? Weight loss surgery does not take away the desire to eat, it does nothing to your appetite, and you can and WILL undo the surgery if you can't keep your diet under control in the first place. It's really a glorified and dangerous placebo, IMO.
  • rome_411
    rome_411 Posts: 29 Member
    I won't judge, but I wouldn't recommend going that route if possible. I have had issues with losing weight and gaining it back in the past myself. I have re-committed since mid-February and taken over 50 lbs off this year. If I can do it, you can too! If you can conquer the mental and emotional triggers, you can make the lifestyle changes and achieve and maintain the physical results that you are looking for. Good luck in your journey!
  • amyk0202
    amyk0202 Posts: 667 Member
    Definitely NOT. I mean, typically you have to prove that you can even stick to healthy caloric consumption and lose weight to even qualify for surgery in the first place. Okay, so you lose weight and qualify for surgery. So, if you can LOSE weight without the surgery , why bother putting yourself through all of that pain and spending all of that money for something that you can do regardless of whether or not you've had part of your stomach removed? Weight loss surgery does not take away the desire to eat, it does nothing to your appetite, and you can and WILL undo the surgery if you can't keep your diet under control in the first place. It's really a glorified and dangerous placebo, IMO.

    I do want to address the bolded statements. Both gastric bypass & vertical sleeve gastrectomy reduce the amount of ghrelin that your body produces. I think that gastric bypass does a slightly better job of it, maybe because more of the stomach is taken out of the picture. This does help with hunger. Also, since my capacity is much smaller, I am able to eat & be satisfied with a much smaller amount than previously. Volume-wise I can fit in around 8oz (maybe 10 oz depending on what it is) of food at a time. If eat more, I am very uncomfortable & prone to heartburn. Feeling full while eating a much smaller amount also helps with my physical appetite which was a big issue for me prior to my surgery. Also, there are immediate positive benefits for people with diabetes:

    "In patients with impaired glucose tolerance most studies report 99-100% prevention of progression to diabetes, while in subjects with diabetes prior to surgery, resolution of the disease is reported in 64-93% of the cases. "

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17709879

    I would say it's more than a placebo & is a valid option for many people.
  • Bearbo27
    Bearbo27 Posts: 339 Member
    edited August 2016
    amyk0202 wrote: »
    Definitely NOT. I mean, typically you have to prove that you can even stick to healthy caloric consumption and lose weight to even qualify for surgery in the first place. Okay, so you lose weight and qualify for surgery. So, if you can LOSE weight without the surgery , why bother putting yourself through all of that pain and spending all of that money for something that you can do regardless of whether or not you've had part of your stomach removed? Weight loss surgery does not take away the desire to eat, it does nothing to your appetite, and you can and WILL undo the surgery if you can't keep your diet under control in the first place. It's really a glorified and dangerous placebo, IMO.

    I do want to address the bolded statements. Both gastric bypass & vertical sleeve gastrectomy reduce the amount of ghrelin that your body produces. I think that gastric bypass does a slightly better job of it, maybe because more of the stomach is taken out of the picture. This does help with hunger. Also, since my capacity is much smaller, I am able to eat & be satisfied with a much smaller amount than previously. Volume-wise I can fit in around 8oz (maybe 10 oz depending on what it is) of food at a time. If eat more, I am very uncomfortable & prone to heartburn. Feeling full while eating a much smaller amount also helps with my physical appetite which was a big issue for me prior to my surgery. Also, there are immediate positive benefits for people with diabetes:

    "In patients with impaired glucose tolerance most studies report 99-100% prevention of progression to diabetes, while in subjects with diabetes prior to surgery, resolution of the disease is reported in 64-93% of the cases. "

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17709879

    I would say it's more than a placebo & is a valid option for many people.

    I agree that for people with severe medical issues it is a good option. I still believe though that many people go into it thinking that this will be a cure all for any weight loss issues. Once they get done with the surgery, they lose the initial weight and do ok. Over time though, many people slip into old habits and just gain the weight right back. Yeah you can only hold 8oz or so at a time. If you slowly over eat though, you would stretch out your pouch and would eventually gain weight. It is a helpful tool, but nothing more.