Different words for the same things depending on which country you're in.

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Replies

  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    kgirlhart wrote: »
    I recall sitting there utterly bemused and slightly horrified as an American exchange student told us how embarrased she was when her dad "growled her out" in public. Apparently that means telling her off. That's NOT what it means here... :/

    That must be regional. I've never heard that expression. We do say someone got 'chewed out" which I guess could be just as bad.

    Yeah, I've never heard "growled her out." I have heard "chewed her out" and would recognize it as American, but it's not that common IME and feels more southern, maybe.
    CyberTone wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Why do Americans say "Tuna fish", why not just Tuna?

    Tuna steak = the way one can normally buy tuna here, not in a can (also IMO delicious).

    Tuna fish = the stuff in the can or a sandwich made from it (I know it's an unpopular opinion, but I can't stand it).

    Tuna = more generic, encompassing all of the above, sashimi with tuna (also good), whatever else.

    Was it because when Chicken of the Sea started canning tuna, we had to make sure some people were aware that there was actually fish in the can, and not chicken?

    Heh.

    I'm southern, never heard that phrase. chewed out i've heard and used though.

    Yeah, I meant "chewed her out" sounds southern to me.

    Never ever heard growled her out.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,051 Member
    Talking about mistaken countries I went to Austria (which is an awesome country btw) and when I got home people were asking me if I saw kangaroos and koalas lol. It must be very common as I saw the shirts in tourist shops in Vienna that made the austria-australia joke.

    Did it go something like this :laugh:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hOLm_k6eCs
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    I've heard of all of these except:
    Cordial - Koolaid
    Sprite - lemonade
    Fizzy lemon squash - Lemonade. This is a tricky one
    That's just crazy talk.

    Baking Soda - Bicarbonate of Soda
    All Purpose Flour - Flour
    Self-Rising Flour - Raising Flour, or sometimes Self-Raising Flour
    Kosher Salt - Salt Flakes

    "Sprite - lemonade" was a big one for me when I visited England. They offered me lemonade with my alcoholic drinks and I was somewhat stumped until I saw the bottle. It was what I usually have under names like 7-Up or Sprite!!

    The other drink mixed by squeezing juice from lemons and adding sugar and water was very specifically called homemade lemonade
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
    We have Sprite and 7 Up too, but lemonade doesn't have lime in it. There's also pink lemonade, but I've never had that.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 8,005 Member
    elebel82 wrote: »
    Australian:

    At home I take my tea white. It took a number of confused looks and wrong orders in the states to eventually come up with "hot black tea with milk." (or space for milk.)
    I still don't understand what the deal is with "cream" in america. Cream to me is thick and what I put on desserts, I put milk in my tea and coffee. Nor do I understand what half n half is.

    I'm glad someone else doesnt get half and half.
    I have not been to main land America but I have been to Hawaii - nobody (except us Australian tourists) had plain milk in tea/coffee.
    The hotel's breakfast buffet had milk in a jug to go on cereal which we used to put in our tea/coffee.
    The actual tea/coffee section did not have milk on offer.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,051 Member
    elebel82 wrote: »
    Australian:

    At home I take my tea white. It took a number of confused looks and wrong orders in the states to eventually come up with "hot black tea with milk." (or space for milk.)
    I still don't understand what the deal is with "cream" in america. Cream to me is thick and what I put on desserts, I put milk in my tea and coffee. Nor do I understand what half n half is.

    I'm glad someone else doesnt get half and half.
    I have not been to main land America but I have been to Hawaii - nobody (except us Australian tourists) had plain milk in tea/coffee.
    The hotel's breakfast buffet had milk in a jug to go on cereal which we used to put in our tea/coffee.
    The actual tea/coffee section did not have milk on offer.

    I don't get it either. Someone pages back mentioned we do have creamer type things here, but i checked at the supermarket the other day and I didn't see any.

    I've said it before, but the choices here are either black coffee/tea or tea/coffee with milk.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    I'm glad someone else doesnt get half and half.
    I have not been to main land America but I have been to Hawaii - nobody (except us Australian tourists) had plain milk in tea/coffee.
    The hotel's breakfast buffet had milk in a jug to go on cereal which we used to put in our tea/coffee.
    The actual tea/coffee section did not have milk on offer.

    I don't think milk is that weird or uncommon. I used to use it in my coffee (that's how I learned to drink coffee) and never had anyone look at me funny (this was in MA, MI, and IL, as well as other states when traveling). I usually see it in coffee places as an option when I happen to notice (I drink it black now, so don't), and I have a friend who asks for it at restaurants, and again it's not treated as strange (this is in Chicago). I wouldn't expect people to know what "white" is for coffee or tea, but milk being added, not weird.

    The deal with half and half, I think, is that it's available in little tiny single servings that apparently sit out without being chilled and so if you have coffee at a meeting it's usually available. That's why I used to drink coffee with it, before I converted to black. You'd add less half and half than you did milk, or at least that's what I did.

    I don't know where the cream thing came from -- are there cultures that influenced American coffee drinking that use cream? I think there are Cuban coffee drinks with cream and when in Vienna they served coffee with cream (including whipped).

    Cream in tea sounds disgusting, so I wonder if the UK/Australian resistance to coffee with cream is a hold-over from tea culture.

    I lack a good knowledge of coffee history. ;-)

    I find sweetener in coffee (or tea, but more coffee) weird because to me coffee just is not supposed to be a sweet beverage, but don't have a particularly strong feeling about cream vs. milk -- just would depend on how much I added if I was adding some (which I don't any more).
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Couple of terms I thought were UK-isms because I'd not heard them before coming to MFP and now wonder if they are US regionalisms:

    "shift the weight" for "lose weight"

    "fluffy" for "chubby" or "have more fat than I'd like"

    Anyone?
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 8,005 Member
    I agree Christine - I mean, you get froth in capacinnos and cream/icecream in iced coffee - but plain ordinary hot tea/coffee you either have black or white - white meaning with milk added, black meaning without.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    I'm glad someone else doesnt get half and half.
    I have not been to main land America but I have been to Hawaii - nobody (except us Australian tourists) had plain milk in tea/coffee.
    The hotel's breakfast buffet had milk in a jug to go on cereal which we used to put in our tea/coffee.
    The actual tea/coffee section did not have milk on offer.

    I don't think milk is that weird or uncommon. I used to use it in my coffee (that's how I learned to drink coffee) and never had anyone look at me funny (this was in MA, MI, and IL, as well as other states when traveling). I usually see it in coffee places as an option when I happen to notice (I drink it black now, so don't), and I have a friend who asks for it at restaurants, and again it's not treated as strange (this is in Chicago). I wouldn't expect people to know what "white" is for coffee or tea, but milk being added, not weird.

    The deal with half and half, I think, is that it's available in little tiny single servings that apparently sit out without being chilled and so if you have coffee at a meeting it's usually available. That's why I used to drink coffee with it, before I converted to black. You'd add less half and half than you did milk, or at least that's what I did.

    I don't know where the cream thing came from -- are there cultures that influenced American coffee drinking that use cream? I think there are Cuban coffee drinks with cream and when in Vienna they served coffee with cream (including whipped).

    Cream in tea sounds disgusting, so I wonder if the UK/Australian resistance to coffee with cream is a hold-over from tea culture.

    I lack a good knowledge of coffee history. ;-)

    I find sweetener in coffee (or tea, but more coffee) weird because to me coffee just is not supposed to be a sweet beverage, but don't have a particularly strong feeling about cream vs. milk -- just would depend on how much I added if I was adding some (which I don't any more).

    Milk was available everywhere on our trip to the states for coffee/tea. If you didn't have a drink with milk (cappuccino, latte etc) there was usually a station at the side with multiple types of milk (full fat, 2%,fat free) and cream and half--half. Half-n-half was the best thing ever in my opinion - part cream, part milk, and made the coffee delicious.

    (the individual servings would be UHT - you can get those as milk too)

    Ordering coffee was a little different -
    you can get freshly brewed coffee (cheap, often refillable/bottomless) and add your own milk/cream,
    or if you want what we call a "long black" in Australia you order an Americano (different to freshly brewed - Americano is made with espresso). More expensive, and not refillable.
    (then there was the huge selection of other options - insane!)
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,051 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    I'm glad someone else doesnt get half and half.
    I have not been to main land America but I have been to Hawaii - nobody (except us Australian tourists) had plain milk in tea/coffee.
    The hotel's breakfast buffet had milk in a jug to go on cereal which we used to put in our tea/coffee.
    The actual tea/coffee section did not have milk on offer.

    I don't think milk is that weird or uncommon. I used to use it in my coffee (that's how I learned to drink coffee) and never had anyone look at me funny (this was in MA, MI, and IL, as well as other states when traveling). I usually see it in coffee places as an option when I happen to notice (I drink it black now, so don't), and I have a friend who asks for it at restaurants, and again it's not treated as strange (this is in Chicago). I wouldn't expect people to know what "white" is for coffee or tea, but milk being added, not weird.

    The deal with half and half, I think, is that it's available in little tiny single servings that apparently sit out without being chilled and so if you have coffee at a meeting it's usually available. That's why I used to drink coffee with it, before I converted to black. You'd add less half and half than you did milk, or at least that's what I did.

    I don't know where the cream thing came from -- are there cultures that influenced American coffee drinking that use cream? I think there are Cuban coffee drinks with cream and when in Vienna they served coffee with cream (including whipped).

    Cream in tea sounds disgusting, so I wonder if the UK/Australian resistance to coffee with cream is a hold-over from tea culture.

    I lack a good knowledge of coffee history. ;-)

    I find sweetener in coffee (or tea, but more coffee) weird because to me coffee just is not supposed to be a sweet beverage, but don't have a particularly strong feeling about cream vs. milk -- just would depend on how much I added if I was adding some (which I don't any more).

    Milk was available everywhere on our trip to the states for coffee/tea. If you didn't have a drink with milk (cappuccino, latte etc) there was usually a station at the side with multiple types of milk (full fat, 2%,fat free) and cream and half--half. Half-n-half was the best thing ever in my opinion - part cream, part milk, and made the coffee delicious.

    (the individual servings would be UHT - you can get those as milk too)

    Ordering coffee was a little different -
    you can get freshly brewed coffee (cheap, often refillable/bottomless) and add your own milk/cream,
    or if you want what we call a "long black" in Australia you order an Americano (different to freshly brewed - Americano is made with espresso). More expensive, and not refillable.
    (then there was the huge selection of other options - insane!)

    Oh boy, waaay too many choices lol
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    I'm glad someone else doesnt get half and half.
    I have not been to main land America but I have been to Hawaii - nobody (except us Australian tourists) had plain milk in tea/coffee.
    The hotel's breakfast buffet had milk in a jug to go on cereal which we used to put in our tea/coffee.
    The actual tea/coffee section did not have milk on offer.

    I don't think milk is that weird or uncommon. I used to use it in my coffee (that's how I learned to drink coffee) and never had anyone look at me funny (this was in MA, MI, and IL, as well as other states when traveling). I usually see it in coffee places as an option when I happen to notice (I drink it black now, so don't), and I have a friend who asks for it at restaurants, and again it's not treated as strange (this is in Chicago). I wouldn't expect people to know what "white" is for coffee or tea, but milk being added, not weird.

    The deal with half and half, I think, is that it's available in little tiny single servings that apparently sit out without being chilled and so if you have coffee at a meeting it's usually available. That's why I used to drink coffee with it, before I converted to black. You'd add less half and half than you did milk, or at least that's what I did.

    I don't know where the cream thing came from -- are there cultures that influenced American coffee drinking that use cream? I think there are Cuban coffee drinks with cream and when in Vienna they served coffee with cream (including whipped).

    Cream in tea sounds disgusting, so I wonder if the UK/Australian resistance to coffee with cream is a hold-over from tea culture.

    I lack a good knowledge of coffee history. ;-)

    I find sweetener in coffee (or tea, but more coffee) weird because to me coffee just is not supposed to be a sweet beverage, but don't have a particularly strong feeling about cream vs. milk -- just would depend on how much I added if I was adding some (which I don't any more).

    Milk was available everywhere on our trip to the states for coffee/tea. If you didn't have a drink with milk (cappuccino, latte etc) there was usually a station at the side with multiple types of milk (full fat, 2%,fat free) and cream and half--half. Half-n-half was the best thing ever in my opinion - part cream, part milk, and made the coffee delicious.

    (the individual servings would be UHT - you can get those as milk too)

    Ordering coffee was a little different -
    you can get freshly brewed coffee (cheap, often refillable/bottomless) and add your own milk/cream,
    or if you want what we call a "long black" in Australia you order an Americano (different to freshly brewed - Americano is made with espresso). More expensive, and not refillable.
    (then there was the huge selection of other options - insane!)

    Oh boy, waaay too many choices lol

    There was sweeteners at the milk station too - blue packet, pink packet, yellow packet, sometimes green/stevia, normal sugar, the unrefined (brown/not brown) sugar, honey in some places!
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,051 Member
    2 more things.

    Lounge - Couch
    Lounge room - Living room
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 22,248 Member
    elebel82 wrote: »
    Australian:
    Chips = us fries
    Chips = uk crisps

    There's rarely any confusion over them - it's usually context that will give it away, though we also do sometimes distinguish hot chips vs potato chips.
    However just about every aussie who visits the US has at least one instance of being disappointed when offered chips with something and getting potato chips. You guys do eat potato chips with weird things (hotdogs, subs, burgers, etc.)

    For that matter, all of the classic bun + meat items that are sold in mcdonalds in australia are "burgers" even the chicken offerings . A "sandwich" is generally a much healthier item, cheese/cold meat such as ham etc/egg with salad in two pieces of bread, such as what's taken to school.
    At home I take my tea white. It took a number of confused looks and wrong orders in the states to eventually come up with "hot black tea with milk." (or space for milk.)
    I still don't understand what the deal is with "cream" in america. Cream to me is thick and what I put on desserts, I put milk in my tea and coffee. Nor do I understand what half n half is.

    Speaking of this ... one that confused me when I first moved to Australia was "salad roll". As in, "I think I'll just have a salad roll for lunch."

    I was envisioning some sort of salad. Nope!
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    elebel82 wrote: »
    Australian:

    At home I take my tea white. It took a number of confused looks and wrong orders in the states to eventually come up with "hot black tea with milk." (or space for milk.)
    I still don't understand what the deal is with "cream" in america. Cream to me is thick and what I put on desserts, I put milk in my tea and coffee. Nor do I understand what half n half is.

    I'm glad someone else doesnt get half and half.
    I have not been to main land America but I have been to Hawaii - nobody (except us Australian tourists) had plain milk in tea/coffee.
    The hotel's breakfast buffet had milk in a jug to go on cereal which we used to put in our tea/coffee.
    The actual tea/coffee section did not have milk on offer.

    I don't get it either. Someone pages back mentioned we do have creamer type things here, but i checked at the supermarket the other day and I didn't see any.

    I've said it before, but the choices here are either black coffee/tea or tea/coffee with milk.

    Strangely enough, I grew up taking milk in tea and coffee. More recently I've seen a culture develop which indicates coffee creamer for coffee, and milk for tea. There are powdered creamers as well as liquid creamers, but the liquid ones seem to be gaining popularity.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    Australia - icing sugar
    US - confectioners sugar

    Pudding can be a general alternative term for dessert (I think that's more British english), or like a steamed pudding (Christmas pudding, sticky date pudding, treacle pudding - often made in a pudding "basin").... I have never quite understood the US pudding.

    When we go out to eat, we ask for the bill at the end of our meal. Not a check. If you want to pay, you might use a cheque (rare these days), not a check.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,051 Member
    What about tipping. It seems in America tipping is a common practice, I've never seen it done here.
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 22,248 Member
    What about tipping. It seems in America tipping is a common practice, I've never seen it done here.

    We tip here in Australia on occasion. Only in restaurants, of course ... and only when the service is exceptionally good.

    In Canada, tipping is only a food-related thing (restaurant, cafe, pizza delivery), and again, only if you think the service was good or maybe if you had a bit of extra change in your pocket.
  • sammyliftsandeats
    sammyliftsandeats Posts: 2,421 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    What about tipping. It seems in America tipping is a common practice, I've never seen it done here.

    We tip here in Australia on occasion. Only in restaurants, of course ... and only when the service is exceptionally good.

    In Canada, tipping is only a food-related thing (restaurant, cafe, pizza delivery), and again, only if you think the service was good or maybe if you had a bit of extra change in your pocket.

    I think that's changed now. I don't know when you were last back in Canada but tipping in Canada is now more along the lines of tipping in America.

  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 8,005 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    I'm glad someone else doesnt get half and half.
    I have not been to main land America but I have been to Hawaii - nobody (except us Australian tourists) had plain milk in tea/coffee.
    The hotel's breakfast buffet had milk in a jug to go on cereal which we used to put in our tea/coffee.
    The actual tea/coffee section did not have milk on offer.

    I don't think milk is that weird or uncommon. I used to use it in my coffee (that's how I learned to drink coffee) and never had anyone look at me funny (this was in MA, MI, and IL, as well as other states when traveling). I usually see it in coffee places as an option when I happen to notice (I drink it black now, so don't), and I have a friend who asks for it at restaurants, and again it's not treated as strange (this is in Chicago). I wouldn't expect people to know what "white" is for coffee or tea, but milk being added, not weird.

    The deal with half and half, I think, is that it's available in little tiny single servings that apparently sit out without being chilled and so if you have coffee at a meeting it's usually available. That's why I used to drink coffee with it, before I converted to black. You'd add less half and half than you did milk, or at least that's what I did.

    I don't know where the cream thing came from -- are there cultures that influenced American coffee drinking that use cream? I think there are Cuban coffee drinks with cream and when in Vienna they served coffee with cream (including whipped).

    Cream in tea sounds disgusting, so I wonder if the UK/Australian resistance to coffee with cream is a hold-over from tea culture.

    I lack a good knowledge of coffee history. ;-)

    I find sweetener in coffee (or tea, but more coffee) weird because to me coffee just is not supposed to be a sweet beverage, but don't have a particularly strong feeling about cream vs. milk -- just would depend on how much I added if I was adding some (which I don't any more).

    Milk was available everywhere on our trip to the states for coffee/tea. If you didn't have a drink with milk (cappuccino, latte etc) there was usually a station at the side with multiple types of milk (full fat, 2%,fat free) and cream and half--half. Half-n-half was the best thing ever in my opinion - part cream, part milk, and made the coffee delicious.

    (the individual servings would be UHT - you can get those as milk too)

    Ordering coffee was a little different -
    you can get freshly brewed coffee (cheap, often refillable/bottomless) and add your own milk/cream,
    or if you want what we call a "long black" in Australia you order an Americano (different to freshly brewed - Americano is made with espresso). More expensive, and not refillable.
    (then there was the huge selection of other options - insane!)

    Possibly the no milk available, only those pre packaged creamer things, was specific to Hawaii and not representative of all of America (having never been to any other state of America to have any experience there.)

    Fresh milk is very expensive in Hawaii as they have no dairy industry and it is all imported - we bought some from supermarket to keep in our hotel fridge and was about 4 x equivalent cost in Australia. (which of course produces its own milk)