Different words for the same things depending on which country you're in.

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Christine_72
Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
edited December 2016 in Food and Nutrition
I thought it would be fun and interesting to compare our different language/words for the same items depending on which country we're from. I didnt quite know where to put this thread, as there are many non food items in my list. But hey ho here we go.
I'll start with what we call it in Australia and try and translate to American :smiley: It doesnt have to be Australian to American if anyone wants to add things, I know Britain differs from us in some things too.
  • Rockmelon - Canteloupe
  • Rocket - Arugula
  • Eggplant - Aubergine (British)
  • Capsicum- Peppers
  • Chili - Peppers
  • Soft Drink - Soda/Pop
  • Biscuits - Cookies
  • Jam - Jelly
  • Jelly - Jello
  • Cordial - Koolaid
  • Sprite - lemonade
  • Fizzy lemon squash - Lemonade. This is a tricky one
  • Milk only for coffee, no creamers here, and cream is actual cream
  • Herbs - Erbs

I'm sure there are loads more that I've forgotten.

Here's the list for generic things, I'll start off with my favourites.
  • Bum - Fanny
  • Fanny - down below female anatomy
  • Thongs - Flip flops
  • G-string - Thongs
  • Car Bonnet - Hood
  • Boot - Trunk
  • Sneakers - Runners
  • Creek - Stream
  • Knickers/undies - Panties

Then there's: kgs/lbs. centimetres/inches/feet. Kms/miles. Grams/ounces. Litres/gallons.

That's it for now, my brain needs a rest lol

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Replies

  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
    edited December 2016
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    Rocket took me a while, when I was traveling years ago.

    An easy one: french fries=chips

    In my neck of America: chile is the pepper (green, but also red), and chili is a dish with meat, sometimes beans and red chile and spices.
  • williams969
    williams969 Posts: 2,528 Member
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    Rocket took me a while, when I was traveling years ago.

    An easy one: french fries=chips

    Yep. (US/UK): fries/chips, but chips/crisps. How about pants/trousers but underwear/pants. Silly differences that could confuse tourists, lol.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
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    Ooh yes, chips/french fries.

    I had to edit my list, because for certain items i put the American version first. I'm so used to using them here, so everyone knows what i'm talking about lol
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)
  • williams969
    williams969 Posts: 2,528 Member
    edited December 2016
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    Don't you call the flat work surface in a kitchen the benchtop, @Christine_72 ? Im the US, a bench is something one sits on at a park or a person has in his workshop/toolshed for woodworking or fixing things, lol.

    Edit, the kitchen surface is a counter in the US, which I suppose makes zero sense for a name, too lol.
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
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    Sneakers/Runners = Trainers (UK)

    I'd tell you what we call cigarettes, but it would probably be kittened out ;-)

    Starts with an F?

    Hehe yep!
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    For me, (who goes back and forth between the U.S and Canada) Tim's and Dunkin are not interchangeable. Tim's (still) has coffee. DD is swill. :smile:

    Depending on your area/province: BBQ can mean "grill" where as BBQ for me means add/cook with bbq sauce, as in a bbq salmon.... NOT the same as grilled salmon.

    poutine... hmm, for me this is only a canadian thing, other wise, it's a wanna be and no. CHEESE? UMM NO.

  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
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    UK 'tramp' = US 'tramp' (derogatory term, usually female)
    UK 'tramp' = US 'bum' (homeless person, usually male)
    UK 'bum' = US 'butt'
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
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    We use the F word for cigarettes too. And we have a very popular brand of cheese who's name people find very racist, its C**n. I actually had an American friend ask me about it when she saw it in my diary

    @williams969 yes, we call them benchtops. Do you guys use the word pantry for the kitchen food cupboard?
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
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    It took me a while to realise that US 'broil' means 'grill' too.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    It took me a while to realise that US 'broil' means 'grill' too.

    Yes! Not for me, but yes!
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
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    Oh and earlier someone posted on a thread about Bok Choy, which is Pak Choi (or Chinese Cabbage) here.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,751 Member
    edited December 2016
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    Don't you call the flat work surface in a kitchen the benchtop, @Christine_72 ? Im the US, a bench is something one sits on at a park or a person has in his workshop/toolshed for woodworking or fixing things, lol.

    Edit, the kitchen surface is a counter in the US, which I suppose makes zero sense for a name, too lol.

    yup, we have a kitchen bench in aus :) we also call the thing you sit on in the park a bench...
    we also have a splash back, not a back splash....we have so much american tv (including reno/flip programs) so i keep mixing them up!!

    we have scones in aus (and UK) - i'm sure they're biscuits in the US

    lollies - sweets/candy
    mince - ground meat
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
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    It took me a while to realise that US 'broil' means 'grill' too.

    Haha me too! I wondered why do these people boil their meat :confounded:

    When we use the bbq, we call it a barbecue lol Americans - grill, right?

    One more

    Prawns - shrimp. We call those teeny tiny ones that you sometimes get on a pizza, shrimps.

  • williams969
    williams969 Posts: 2,528 Member
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    We use the F word for cigarettes too. And we have a very popular brand of cheese who's name people find very racist, its C**n. I actually had an American friend ask me about it when she saw it in my diary

    @williams969 yes, we call them benchtops. Do you guys use the word pantry for the kitchen food cupboard?

    It's a pantry if it's a floor to ceiling cupboard. If it's just top cabinets (above the counter/bench, then it's just called the cupboard/cabinet). But, pantries are not that common in the US, at least i the homes/apartments I've been in.

    Oh, another one: apartments/condo in the US = flats in the UK.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    Oh and earlier someone posted on a thread about Bok Choy, which is Pak Choi (or Chinese Cabbage) here.

    It's both for me...