Different words for the same things depending on which country you're in.

Options
145791046

Replies

  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Options
    Great thread, Christine!

    Will mostly catch up later, but in case someone hasn't already posted this:
    jgnatca wrote: »
    Canada - US

    pop - soda

    It's pop in many parts of the US too, such as the midwest. I picked up soda when at college in MA, but reverted to pop after and now use them interchangeably.
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    Options
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes, but what we call boob tubes you call tube tops.

    I get it. I misinterpreted your previous post.

    So up the girls interpreted the saying as siting on their kitty staring at their rack.

    Rack?? Is that one Australian, American, or British??
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    Options
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes, but what we call boob tubes you call tube tops.

    I get it. I misinterpreted your previous post.

    So up the girls interpreted the saying as siting on their kitty staring at their rack.

    I got some interesting looks when I lived in the UK and told some friends I was wearing pants and thongs to a party (instead of trousers and flip flops...)

    does the US have toasted sandwiches? or are they called grilled cheese?
    we have toasted sandwiches (pressed) or jaffles (squished together in a machine that seals the edges and holds the filling in)

    "Thongs" or "Flip-flops" I call slippers. Definitely won't use the word "thongs" in that way.
  • cerise_noir
    cerise_noir Posts: 5,468 Member
    edited December 2016
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    Heh...how did I know the whole fanny thing would be mentioned? :laugh:

    Aussies: I'm going to use the toilet.
    US/Canada: I am going to use the bathroom.

    I do realise that in the US/Canada, the w/c and bath tub/shower are mostly in the same room. In Australia, these can be separate rooms. I honestly prefer the separate rooms.

    As for the coffee creamer thing. I am pretty sure I've seen coffee whitener in Oz.


    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    As an Aussie who lives in Quebec, the home of Poutine.

    It depends on the poutine. There's a place down the road that makes the most incredible poutine. The cheese is actually curd cheese which works well with the gravy. I've had bad poutine, but this poutine...oh my god. Delicious.

    Toilet and bathroom both work for me, but what about latrine or lavatory?

    Or water closet?

    How about outhouse? Dunny? Loo?
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    Options
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Rubber ---> condom in Canada

    Both, for me, it's more a register variation, than a regional one. My nephews may talk about rubbers. But their teachers talk about condoms.

    A rubber was always an eraser when I was at school.
  • cerise_noir
    cerise_noir Posts: 5,468 Member
    edited December 2016
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Rubber ---> condom in Canada

    Both, for me, it's more a register variation, than a regional one. My nephews may talk about rubbers. But their teachers talk about condoms.

    A rubber was always an eraser when I was at school.

    Same here. Wouldn't dare ask to borrow one now, though. ;)

    Hey @Christine_72 Remember our previous rubber chat? :laugh:
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,751 Member
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes, but what we call boob tubes you call tube tops.

    I get it. I misinterpreted your previous post.

    So up the girls interpreted the saying as siting on their kitty staring at their rack.

    Rack?? Is that one Australian, American, or British??

    definitely a term used in Australia...don't know about the others
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,343 Member
    edited December 2016
    Options
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Great thread, Christine!

    Will mostly catch up later, but in case someone hasn't already posted this:
    jgnatca wrote: »
    Canada - US

    pop - soda

    It's pop in many parts of the US too, such as the midwest. I picked up soda when at college in MA, but reverted to pop after and now use them interchangeably.

    My wife is from Michigan - they drank pop. I grew up in southern California - we drank soda. My dad grew up in the south - they drank coke (they refer to any soda/pop drink as a "coke") - or sometimes he'd call it "sodee pop".
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Rubber ---> condom in Canada

    Both, for me, it's more a register variation, than a regional one. My nephews may talk about rubbers. But their teachers talk about condoms.

    A rubber was always an eraser when I was at school.

    Same here. Wouldn't dare ask to borrow one now, though. ;)

    Hey @Christine_72 Remember our previous rubber chat? :laugh:

    Yes, yes I do :lol: Wasn't it something about borrowing someones used rubber, or some such?
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    Heh...how did I know the whole fanny thing would be mentioned? :laugh:

    Aussies: I'm going to use the toilet.
    US/Canada: I am going to use the bathroom.

    I do realise that in the US/Canada, the w/c and bath tub/shower are mostly in the same room. In Australia, these can be separate rooms. I honestly prefer the separate rooms.

    As for the coffee creamer thing. I am pretty sure I've seen coffee whitener in Oz.


    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    As an Aussie who lives in Quebec, the home of Poutine.

    It depends on the poutine. There's a place down the road that makes the most incredible poutine. The cheese is actually curd cheese which works well with the gravy. I've had bad poutine, but this poutine...oh my god. Delicious.

    Toilet and bathroom both work for me, but what about latrine or lavatory?

    Or water closet?

    How about outhouse? Dunny? Loo?

    I always call it the loo
  • cerise_noir
    cerise_noir Posts: 5,468 Member
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Rubber ---> condom in Canada

    Both, for me, it's more a register variation, than a regional one. My nephews may talk about rubbers. But their teachers talk about condoms.

    A rubber was always an eraser when I was at school.

    Same here. Wouldn't dare ask to borrow one now, though. ;)

    Hey @Christine_72 Remember our previous rubber chat? :laugh:

    Yes, yes I do :lol: Wasn't it something about borrowing someones used rubber, or some such?
    Indeed it was. It was great!
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    Options
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Great thread, Christine!

    Will mostly catch up later, but in case someone hasn't already posted this:
    jgnatca wrote: »
    Canada - US

    pop - soda

    It's pop in many parts of the US too, such as the midwest. I picked up soda when at college in MA, but reverted to pop after and now use them interchangeably.

    they drank coke (they refer to any soda/pop drink as a "coke") .

    That one has always confounded me, what if they want sprite or mountain dew, something other than coke? Here you say specifically what you want, if you say you want a soft drink/soda then you get what you're given!

  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    Options
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Great thread, Christine!

    Will mostly catch up later, but in case someone hasn't already posted this:
    jgnatca wrote: »
    Canada - US

    pop - soda

    It's pop in many parts of the US too, such as the midwest. I picked up soda when at college in MA, but reverted to pop after and now use them interchangeably.

    My wife is from Michigan - they drank pop. I grew up in southern California - we drank soda. My dad grew up in the south - they drank coke (they refer to any soda/pop drink as a "coke") - or sometimes he'd call it "sodee pop".

    We just called them sweet drinks, and the more refined people said aerated or carbonated beverages.
  • bunnyluv19
    bunnyluv19 Posts: 103 Member
    Options
    U.S./Canada
    candy bar/chocolate bar
    trash/garbage
    gutter/eavestrough
    railing/bannister
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes, but what we call boob tubes you call tube tops.

    I get it. I misinterpreted your previous post.

    So up the girls interpreted the saying as siting on their kitty staring at their rack.

    Rack?? Is that one Australian, American, or British??

    Canadian slang.
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,343 Member
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes, but what we call boob tubes you call tube tops.

    I get it. I misinterpreted your previous post.

    So up the girls interpreted the saying as siting on their kitty staring at their rack.

    I got some interesting looks when I lived in the UK and told some friends I was wearing pants and thongs to a party (instead of trousers and flip flops...)

    does the US have toasted sandwiches? or are they called grilled cheese?
    we have toasted sandwiches (pressed) or jaffles (squished together in a machine that seals the edges and holds the filling in)

    "Thongs" or "Flip-flops" I call slippers. Definitely won't use the word "thongs" in that way.

    I remember them being called "thongs" back in the '60s, but I've always referred to them as "flip flops". Some people call them 'sandals', but I think of sandals as something different - more of the Birkenstock-type things with multiple straps over the foot and buckles/velcro to fasten them.

    "Slippers" are the soft, fuzzy shoes I wear with my PJs or bathrobe. :)
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    Heh...how did I know the whole fanny thing would be mentioned? :laugh:

    Aussies: I'm going to use the toilet.
    US/Canada: I am going to use the bathroom.

    I do realise that in the US/Canada, the w/c and bath tub/shower are mostly in the same room. In Australia, these can be separate rooms. I honestly prefer the separate rooms.

    As for the coffee creamer thing. I am pretty sure I've seen coffee whitener in Oz.


    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    As an Aussie who lives in Quebec, the home of Poutine.

    It depends on the poutine. There's a place down the road that makes the most incredible poutine. The cheese is actually curd cheese which works well with the gravy. I've had bad poutine, but this poutine...oh my god. Delicious.

    Toilet and bathroom both work for me, but what about latrine or lavatory?

    I think of the military when I hear latrine, and airplanes with lavatory.
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    Options
    "Normal" football is called Soccer in America. American football looks more like Rugby to me, but I never got that clarified.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,751 Member
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    "Normal" football is called Soccer in America. American football looks more like Rugby to me, but I never got that clarified.

    Australia has football (Australian rules), soccer (although there are plenty of English expats who call it football), gridiron (for American football)...
  • Skyblueyellow
    Skyblueyellow Posts: 225 Member
    edited December 2016
    Options
    U.S./Canada
    candy bar/chocolate bar
    trash/garbage
    gutter/eavestrough
    railing/bannister

    I'm in the US and I say chocolate bar, garbage and bannister, but not eavestrough.

    I say soda and not pop. We do have scones here as well. I live in an area that was originally settled by the Germans.

    Also, I "use the restroom".