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Different words for the same things depending on which country you're in.

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  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
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    jumper - sweater
    trackpants - sweatpants
    nappy - diaper

    Dummy - pacifier

    Here a pacifier is also called a soother.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    jumper - sweater
    trackpants - sweatpants
    nappy - diaper

    Dummy - pacifier

    Here a pacifier is also called a soother.
    And here it's a Chup.
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
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    I've got friends in the north of England that call trousers 'pants', but to me 'pants' are underwear.


    for me (sw us) pants are what you wear on the outside to work or school, BUT, I'm also comfortable with trousers and slacks.

    And for me: underwear, yes, but I'm also comfortable with gotch or knickers for underwear. Which my grandmother called "unmentionables".

    We have gonchies or ginch.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
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    I've got friends in the north of England that call trousers 'pants', but to me 'pants' are underwear.

    Don't you guys say "that's pants" for something they dislike?
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
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    I've got friends in the north of England that call trousers 'pants', but to me 'pants' are underwear.


    for me (sw us) pants are what you wear on the outside to work or school, BUT, I'm also comfortable with trousers and slacks.

    And for me: underwear, yes, but I'm also comfortable with gotch or knickers for underwear. Which my grandmother called "unmentionables".

    I've not heard 'gotch' before! My granny used to call them her "'foundations".

    US 'vest' is UK 'waistcoat', and UK 'vest' is US 'wifebeater'. UK 'wifebeater' is a nickname for cheap, strong lager (usually Stella Artois).
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    AnvilHead wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes, but what we call boob tubes you call tube tops.

    I get it. I misinterpreted your previous post.

    So up the girls interpreted the saying as siting on their kitty staring at their rack.

    I got some interesting looks when I lived in the UK and told some friends I was wearing pants and thongs to a party (instead of trousers and flip flops...)

    does the US have toasted sandwiches? or are they called grilled cheese?
    we have toasted sandwiches (pressed) or jaffles (squished together in a machine that seals the edges and holds the filling in)

    Might be a regional thing, but in the Southwestern US (where I've lived my entire life), those have always been called "turnovers" or "paninis".

    for ME in the SW U.S. Panini is a ... california thing. Think: Panera Bread.
    For me, toasted, pressed sandwiches are either sandwiches or... empanadas (depending on filling).
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
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    I've got friends in the north of England that call trousers 'pants', but to me 'pants' are underwear.

    Don't you guys say "that's pants" for something they dislike?

    Yes! Or "that's bobbins".
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,751 Member
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    I've got friends in the north of England that call trousers 'pants', but to me 'pants' are underwear.


    for me (sw us) pants are what you wear on the outside to work or school, BUT, I'm also comfortable with trousers and slacks.

    And for me: underwear, yes, but I'm also comfortable with gotch or knickers for underwear. Which my grandmother called "unmentionables".

    I've not heard 'gotch' before! My granny used to call them her "'foundations".

    US 'vest' is UK 'waistcoat', and UK 'vest' is US 'wifebeater'. UK 'wifebeater' is a nickname for cheap, strong lager (usually Stella Artois).

    we often call those singlets or tank tops in Aus (but a particular type worn by guys is also called a wifebeater)
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    I've got friends in the north of England that call trousers 'pants', but to me 'pants' are underwear.


    for me (sw us) pants are what you wear on the outside to work or school, BUT, I'm also comfortable with trousers and slacks.

    And for me: underwear, yes, but I'm also comfortable with gotch or knickers for underwear. Which my grandmother called "unmentionables".

    I've not heard 'gotch' before! My granny used to call them her "'foundations".

    US 'vest' is UK 'waistcoat', and UK 'vest' is US 'wifebeater'. UK 'wifebeater' is a nickname for cheap, strong lager (usually Stella Artois).

    Gotch is probably a prairies canadian thing....

    yes a wife beater is a tank top. for me.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,751 Member
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    in aus we have wine in bag in a box, we call it cask wine (perhaps boxed wine in the US?) ...but it can also be called a goon bag
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
    edited December 2016
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    Ah tank tops are knitted pullovers (sleeveless sweaters) that our mums used to make us wear in the 70s.
  • williams969
    williams969 Posts: 2,528 Member
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    Ah tank tops are knitted pullovers (sleeveless sweaters) that our mums used to make us wear in the 70s.

    Ugh. Yes, and no matter what you called them, children across the globe were dressed in those hideous things. Stripes, plaids, and paisleys (or the lucky child in an inoffensive solid) in lovely shades of harvest gold, avocado, and sunburnt sienna and orange. We had a matching macrame owl hanging on the wall :D
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    My American friend could not comprehend the attraction of Tim's. He tried to tell me the doughnuts were not that special.

    Here's another one I hit every time we visit the US. We ask for Brown bread and get a blank stare. "I mean wheat bread," OK then.
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
    Options
    Ah tank tops are knitted pullovers (sleeveless sweaters) that our mums used to make us wear in the 70s.

    Ugh. Yes, and no matter what you called them, children across the globe were dressed in those hideous things. Stripes, plaids, and paisleys (or the lucky child in an inoffensive solid) in lovely shades of harvest gold, avocado, and sunburnt sienna and orange. We had a matching macrame owl hanging on the wall :D

    I had Fair Isle ones, but now I wish I'd had a matching owl! We had macrame hanging flower pot holders, which my brothers used for target practice!
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    The American wife-beater tank top.

    https://goo.gl/images/tn1oFE
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
    Options
    Ah tank tops are knitted pullovers (sleeveless sweaters) that our mums used to make us wear in the 70s.

    Ugh. Yes, and no matter what you called them, children across the globe were dressed in those hideous things. Stripes, plaids, and paisleys (or the lucky child in an inoffensive solid) in lovely shades of harvest gold, avocado, and sunburnt sienna and orange. We had a matching macrame owl hanging on the wall :D

    I had Fair Isle ones, but now I wish I'd had a matching owl! We had macrame hanging flower pot holders, which my brothers used for target practice!

    We wanted the fair isle ones!
  • VKetoV
    VKetoV Posts: 111 Member
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    "I said give me a god **** liter cola!"
  • malibu927
    malibu927 Posts: 17,564 Member
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    jgnatca wrote: »
    My American friend could not comprehend the attraction of Tim's. He tried to tell me the doughnuts were not that special.

    Here's another one I hit every time we visit the US. We ask for Brown bread and get a blank stare. "I mean wheat bread," OK then.

    I'm in the US and my city only has a Tim's and a local donut shop. Closest Dunkin Donuts is about 25 miles away (they used to actually be around, then closed, and now say they're building up in the region again). I couldn't tell you where the closest Krispy Kreme is. Plus I think my mom prefers Timbits to Munchkins (Dunkin's version).