Different words for the same things depending on which country you're in.

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  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    It took me a while to realise that US 'broil' means 'grill' too.

    Haha me too! I wondered why do these people boil their meat :confounded:

    When we use the bbq, we call it a barbecue lol Americans - grill, right?

    One more

    Prawns - shrimp. We call those teeny tiny ones that you sometimes get on a pizza, shrimps.
    For me (not near water) they are all shrimp, but when I travel I aim for prawns!
  • mysticlizard
    mysticlizard Posts: 896 Member
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    parking lot - car park
    mobile - cell
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,751 Member
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    It took me a while to realise that US 'broil' means 'grill' too.

    Haha me too! I wondered why do these people boil their meat :confounded:

    When we use the bbq, we call it a barbecue lol Americans - grill, right?

    One more

    Prawns - shrimp. We call those teeny tiny ones that you sometimes get on a pizza, shrimps.

    i'm sure some places call the big prawns langoustine/langosteen (but I think officially that's a weird type of little lobster)

  • williams969
    williams969 Posts: 2,528 Member
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    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    For me, (who goes back and forth between the U.S and Canada) Tim's and Dunkin are not interchangeable. Tim's (still) has coffee. DD is swill. :smile:

    Depending on your area/province: BBQ can mean "grill" where as BBQ for me means add/cook with bbq sauce, as in a bbq salmon.... NOT the same as grilled salmon.

    poutine... hmm, for me this is only a canadian thing, other wise, it's a wanna be and no. CHEESE? UMM NO.

    Although in the South and SW US (particularly Texas, they own this, apparently), BBQ means cooking meat outdoors on huge pits (even dug out into the ground) for a long time over wood smoke. Those little barbies/grills are for "grilling" (fast cooking over charcoal or propane fire).
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
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    It took me a while to realise that US 'broil' means 'grill' too.

    Haha me too! I wondered why do these people boil their meat :confounded:

    When we use the bbq, we call it a barbecue lol Americans - grill, right?

    One more

    Prawns - shrimp. We call those teeny tiny ones that you sometimes get on a pizza, shrimps.

    i'm sure some places call the big prawns langoustine/langosteen (but I think officially that's a weird type of little lobster)

    Langoustine and scampi are interchangeable here. Usually, the only difference is the price :-/
  • cerise_noir
    cerise_noir Posts: 5,468 Member
    edited December 2016
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    Heh...how did I know the whole fanny thing would be mentioned? :laugh:

    Aussies: I'm going to use the toilet.
    US/Canada: I am going to use the bathroom.

    I do realise that in the US/Canada, the w/c and bath tub/shower are mostly in the same room. In Australia, these can be separate rooms. I honestly prefer the separate rooms.

    As for the coffee creamer thing. I am pretty sure I've seen coffee whitener in Oz.


    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    As an Aussie who lives in Quebec, the home of Poutine.

    It depends on the poutine. There's a place down the road that makes the most incredible poutine. The cheese is actually curd cheese which works well with the gravy. I've had bad poutine, but this poutine...oh my god. Delicious.
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,343 Member
    edited December 2016
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    It took me a while to realise that US 'broil' means 'grill' too.

    Haha me too! I wondered why do these people boil their meat :confounded:

    When we use the bbq, we call it a barbecue lol Americans - grill, right?

    One more

    Prawns - shrimp. We call those teeny tiny ones that you sometimes get on a pizza, shrimps.

    That's kind of a technical one and often misused. A lot of Americans say they're "barbecuing" if they're cooking hamburgers/hot dogs/whatever on the grill, but technically they're grilling. "Barbecuing" is actually slow-cooking meats at low temperatures (called "low and slow"), such as beef brisket, pork shoulder/ribs, whole hog, etc., usually with some kind of hardwood used/added to the fire for a smoky flavor. Sometimes also called "smoking" the meat.

    It's also a very regional thing as far as what meats are used, how they're sauced and what woods are used for the smoke. Texas BBQ differs from Kansas City BBQ, which differs from Carolina BBQ (and which style of Carolina BBQ), all of which are different from Santa Maria (CA) style BBQ, and so on.

    Another one nobody has mentioned yet: Oatmeal and porridge.
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
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    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    For me, (who goes back and forth between the U.S and Canada) Tim's and Dunkin are not interchangeable. Tim's (still) has coffee. DD is swill. :smile:

    Depending on your area/province: BBQ can mean "grill" where as BBQ for me means add/cook with bbq sauce, as in a bbq salmon.... NOT the same as grilled salmon.

    poutine... hmm, for me this is only a canadian thing, other wise, it's a wanna be and no. CHEESE? UMM NO.

    Although in the South and SW US (particularly Texas, they own this, apparently), BBQ means cooking meat outdoors on huge pits (even dug out into the ground) for a long time over wood smoke. Those little barbies/grills are for "grilling" (fast cooking over charcoal or propane fire).

    I'm in the southwest. We grill. :smile:
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
    edited December 2016
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    AnvilHead wrote: »
    It took me a while to realise that US 'broil' means 'grill' too.

    Haha me too! I wondered why do these people boil their meat :confounded:

    When we use the bbq, we call it a barbecue lol Americans - grill, right?

    One more

    Prawns - shrimp. We call those teeny tiny ones that you sometimes get on a pizza, shrimps.

    That's kind of a technical one and often misused. A lot of Americans say they're "barbecuing" if they're cooking hamburgers/hot dogs/whatever on the grill, but technically they're grilling. "Barbecuing" is actually slow-cooking meats at low temperatures (called "low and slow"), such as beef brisket, pork shoulder/ribs, whole hog, etc., usually with some kind of hardwood used/added to the fire for a smoky flavor. Sometimes also called "smoking" the meat.

    It's also a very regional thing as far as what meats are used, how they're sauced and what woods are used for the smoke. Texas BBQ differs from Kansas City BBQ, which differs from Carolina BBQ (and which style of Carolina BBQ), and so on.

    Another one nobody has mentioned yet: Oatmeal and porridge.

    This is way way too complex for me. :smile: It's all grilling. Unless it's smoking.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    Heh...how did I know the whole fanny thing would be mentioned? :laugh:

    Aussies: I'm going to use the toilet.
    US/Canada: I am going to use the bathroom.

    I do realise that in the US/Canada, the w/c and bath tub/shower are mostly in the same room. In Australia, these can be separate rooms. I honestly prefer the separate rooms.


    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    As an Aussie who lives in Quebec, the home of Poutine.

    It depends on the poutine. There's a place down the road that makes the most incredible poutine. The cheese is actually curd cheese which works well with the gravy. I've had bad poutine, but this poutine...oh my god. Delicious.
    cheese curd, now THAT is different than drizzled velveeta. And I'm *ok* with that on poutine.
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
    edited December 2016
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    UK Hob = US Stove

    Oh wait, I might have got that one wrong. We call the burners on top 'hob', and the enclosed bit 'oven'. Stove is a manufacturer who makes both.
  • williams969
    williams969 Posts: 2,528 Member
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    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    For me, (who goes back and forth between the U.S and Canada) Tim's and Dunkin are not interchangeable. Tim's (still) has coffee. DD is swill. :smile:

    Depending on your area/province: BBQ can mean "grill" where as BBQ for me means add/cook with bbq sauce, as in a bbq salmon.... NOT the same as grilled salmon.

    poutine... hmm, for me this is only a canadian thing, other wise, it's a wanna be and no. CHEESE? UMM NO.

    Although in the South and SW US (particularly Texas, they own this, apparently), BBQ means cooking meat outdoors on huge pits (even dug out into the ground) for a long time over wood smoke. Those little barbies/grills are for "grilling" (fast cooking over charcoal or propane fire).

    I'm in the southwest. We grill. :smile:

    Oh, we grill, too. I leave the bbqing to professionals.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
    Options
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes. the boob tube is the television.
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
    Options
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes, but what we call boob tubes you call tube tops.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
    Options
    jgnatca wrote: »
    Cool that you started this:

    Canada - US

    pop - soda
    burger - dinner plate
    poutine - "who the *kitten* puts cheese curds on fries???"
    double-double (coffee with double sugar, double cream)
    Timmy's - Dunkin' Doughnuts

    Canada - Australia

    fifty-fifty (10% cream)

    For me, (who goes back and forth between the U.S and Canada) Tim's and Dunkin are not interchangeable. Tim's (still) has coffee. DD is swill. :smile:

    Depending on your area/province: BBQ can mean "grill" where as BBQ for me means add/cook with bbq sauce, as in a bbq salmon.... NOT the same as grilled salmon.

    poutine... hmm, for me this is only a canadian thing, other wise, it's a wanna be and no. CHEESE? UMM NO.

    Although in the South and SW US (particularly Texas, they own this, apparently), BBQ means cooking meat outdoors on huge pits (even dug out into the ground) for a long time over wood smoke. Those little barbies/grills are for "grilling" (fast cooking over charcoal or propane fire).

    I'm in the southwest. We grill. :smile:

    Oh, we grill, too. I leave the bbqing to professionals.

    Agreed. yes, BBQs are those fancy smoker things that people hire for parties or civic festivals.
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
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    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Oh my. I was working internationally and we were having a similar conversation about different word meanings. The looks on the girls faces when I used the phrase "sitting on your fanny watching the boob tube." It was all kinds of fun!

    LOL Thank you Wikipedia, for explaining that Americans call boob tubes 'tube tops'

    Actually, we used the term boob tube to refer to televisions.

    Yes, but what we call boob tubes you call tube tops.

    I get it. I misinterpreted your previous post.

    So up the girls interpreted the saying as siting on their kitty staring at their rack.