Do you eat your exercise calories ??

Options
24

Replies

  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 10,028 Member
    Options
    sijomial wrote: »
    I try not to, the bigger deficit, the bigger the weight loss

    And depending on how much you have to lose, the bigger the deficit, the more muscle mass you will lose. Your body can only oxidize so much fat in a day. The less total fat you have, the less percentage of that fat you can burn off. Once your body has burned off the amount of fat it can in a day, it takes the rest from other sources, meaning a bigger deficit is not always a better deficit as the goal is to lose fat not muscle and other lean mass.

    Can't you prevent that, by eating, drinking additional protein and lifting weights?

    That's only two of the three things that guard against muscle loss - the third being NOT HAVING an excessive and prolonged deficit.

    FIFY
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,865 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    I try not to, the bigger deficit, the bigger the weight loss

    And depending on how much you have to lose, the bigger the deficit, the more muscle mass you will lose. Your body can only oxidize so much fat in a day. The less total fat you have, the less percentage of that fat you can burn off. Once your body has burned off the amount of fat it can in a day, it takes the rest from other sources, meaning a bigger deficit is not always a better deficit as the goal is to lose fat not muscle and other lean mass.

    Can't you prevent that, by eating, drinking additional protein and lifting weights?

    My target with MFP to lose a Lb is 1900 calories...during cycling season I can routinely burn 1,000 - 1,500 calories on a training ride which would leave me at 400-900 net calories...I don't think protein and lifting are going to do much in that scenario.

    Even when I'm not training, I routinely burn 600 calories per day with exercise...so I'd be netting 1,300 calories...sorry...I'm not a little old lady. Beyond that, I have about 10 - 15 Lbs to lose that I put on while injured so a bigger deficit would pretty mush ensure I'm losing muscle mass as I don't have the body fat to mobilize for that kind of deficit.

    Also, fueling your training is important to performance as well as recovery and improved fitness.
  • Mick_Jaguar
    Mick_Jaguar Posts: 21 Member
    Options
    I try not to.
  • DavidRocketts
    DavidRocketts Posts: 80 Member
    Options
    Measuring exercise and food calories is approximate. If hungry I'll eat 25% earned by exercise...
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
    Options
    keen78 wrote: »
    Im not sure if you should eat your exercise calories???

    If you want to wind up skinny fat (no longer overweight, but with very little muscle) then don't eat them back.
  • kgirlhart
    kgirlhart Posts: 5,038 Member
    Options
    Mfp is designed for you to eat your exercise calories. If you used a TDEE calculator to get your calorie goal then do not eat the exercise calories. But if you are using mfp's goal then you should be eating at least a portion of the exercise calories. If you start out eating 50% of them then in about 4 weeks you can reevaluate. If you are losing faster than your goal then you should eat back more, if you are losing slower than your goal then eat back less.
  • TABSterling
    TABSterling Posts: 1 Member
    Options
    Yes! I eat my exercise calories. Well, sort of...

    I use a fitness tracker (w/chest strap heart rate monitor) for my calorie burn. I find to be extremely accurate. I use my calorie burn to gauge how hard I'm working (compared to my average burn) and supplement extra calories based on the type of my workout. On heavy/intense weight lifting days, I use exercise calories to add lean protein. On days I run, I use calories for nutrient-dense carbohydrates. I agree with others that I still try to end the day with an overall calorie deficit but you need to put back what you take out, so I allow some extra calories, eaten responsibly, on workout days!

    I TRY not to use exercise calories as an opportunity to eat more cookies but I will say the holiday season was difficult. Every day is a new day. Happy to get back on track!
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
    Options
    Measuring exercise and food calories is approximate.

    My Garmin only credits me with 87 to 89 % of the calories I burn on the bike. Every time.

    That reminds me, I need to pick up new batteries for my Vectors.
  • cchhiipp22
    cchhiipp22 Posts: 37 Member
    Options
    I've noticed that on exercise days, I often don't feel hungry enough to eat them all back - my appetite isn't much different than a non-exercise day. So I don't force myself to hit the mark. If I'm a couple hundred calories shy of my goal, I will just lose weight a little bit faster than my goal pace. Since my goal pace is moderate, I'm not worried about having too high a calorie deficit on the exercise days.
  • aarar
    aarar Posts: 684 Member
    Options
    Absolutely! I've been doing this 4 years and having the extra calorie allowance is part of what makes it easier to keep going.
  • rileysowner
    rileysowner Posts: 8,254 Member
    Options
    cchhiipp22 wrote: »
    I've noticed that on exercise days, I often don't feel hungry enough to eat them all back - my appetite isn't much different than a non-exercise day. So I don't force myself to hit the mark. If I'm a couple hundred calories shy of my goal, I will just lose weight a little bit faster than my goal pace. Since my goal pace is moderate, I'm not worried about having too high a calorie deficit on the exercise days.

    The problem with saying let your hunger be your guide is that if a person has struggled with weight for a long time, like me, their hunger and satiated sensations are messed up. Experience tells me that means there are times I feel like I am full, when I have not eaten nearly enough to get the nutrients I need, and other time, I feel I am hunger when there is no way I need any more calories or nutrients. Part of the process of getting to a healthy weight is retraining the minds and bodies of people like me to have proper hunger/satiation sensing. Whether that is possible, I am not sure, but I am guessing that it is, but will take a long time since the disordered patterns have been set for many many years. So suggesting, eat only if you are hungry, doesn't do anything to deal with that disordered pattern many of us struggle with. I say eat the appropriate amount of calories even if you are not hungry. It is part of the retraining process.
  • greenbaymichele
    greenbaymichele Posts: 8 Member
    Options
    It really depends on the day. I usually eat about half of them on average.
  • Funnylittlenut
    Funnylittlenut Posts: 72 Member
    Options
    On days that I exercise, I try to close the gap a little, but my stomach is very sensitive to volume changes so I have to be careful. See, I plan to eat at my deficit level. If I've already had breakfast and lunch before I exercise, at dinner time I'm left with quite a few extra calories! While I *could* eat them all back, it would be at risk of giving myself an upset stomach from eating so much in one sitting. So on days I exercise, I let myself have an indulgence like ice cream and generally leave it at that even if I'm still under. It'll give me leeway for the future.
  • essexgirl1971
    essexgirl1971 Posts: 28 Member
    Options
    struggling to eat my calorie allowance let alone exercise calories
  • cabwj
    cabwj Posts: 843 Member
    Options
    As a rule I don't, but they're there if something yummy but unplanned comes along :wink: