What is your resting heart rate ?

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1356

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  • barbaraprudhomme
    barbaraprudhomme Posts: 12 Member
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    Mine is usually between 45-50
  • iofred
    iofred Posts: 488 Member
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    48 avg
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,344 Member
    edited March 2017
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    sijomial wrote: »
    A little derail, but how do you figure out your resting and max heart rate? I looked it up once, but I couldn't find my pulse. I have a chest HRM strap, no continual monitor. I like to use my heart rate for my runs, but the default Garmin zones seem low. Would I just throw on my strap first thing in the AM and start a fake activity to get my resting? How about max? I seem to hit my guestimated max HR during most runs. Does that seem right?
    @jennybearlv
    No that won't be your absolute maximum - you have to push to an extreme level, not a routine level.
    A ramp test for example where the speed increases steadily until you finally go anaerobic at the point of complete exhaustion.

    It's not something to undertake lightly!
    I did mine as part of a VO2 max test in a sports science lab, took 3 days to recover including suffering from exercise induced asthma.

    Just to put an exclamation point on this response, I did my own max HR test on a treadmill and I too was wiped out for three or four days. I will never do it again, the number just isn't that important and mine was right where all the online charts put it without me almost killing myself. Unless you are training for an elite event I just don't see the need for the test, not for the average Joe or Jane.

    All I know is that my HRmax as predicted by the age-old "220-age" formula is 166. I sometimes hit HRs in the low/mid 160s while running, with only a moderately high perceived exertion - I don't feel anywhere near like I'm going to blow up and can sustain it for 10-15 minutes (or more) at a time. So while I've never done a HRmax test (and don't plan to), I can be reasonably sure that mine is somewhere considerably above the predicted 166.

    I can see where accurate data for things like HRmax and LTHR would be relevant to competitive endurance athletes to help pace their training/races, but as you said, for the average Joe/Jane it's not terribly important. If you're seeing spots, gasping for breath and feel like your heart is going to explode out of your chest, you're probably at/near HRMax and need to slow down.
  • rakowskidp
    rakowskidp Posts: 231 Member
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    I've just looked over my records for the past few weeks, and it's been between 49 and 52.
  • jennybearlv
    jennybearlv Posts: 1,519 Member
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    AnvilHead wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    A little derail, but how do you figure out your resting and max heart rate? I looked it up once, but I couldn't find my pulse. I have a chest HRM strap, no continual monitor. I like to use my heart rate for my runs, but the default Garmin zones seem low. Would I just throw on my strap first thing in the AM and start a fake activity to get my resting? How about max? I seem to hit my guestimated max HR during most runs. Does that seem right?
    @jennybearlv
    No that won't be your absolute maximum - you have to push to an extreme level, not a routine level.
    A ramp test for example where the speed increases steadily until you finally go anaerobic at the point of complete exhaustion.

    It's not something to undertake lightly!
    I did mine as part of a VO2 max test in a sports science lab, took 3 days to recover including suffering from exercise induced asthma.

    Just to put an exclamation point on this response, I did my own max HR test on a treadmill and I too was wiped out for three or four days. I will never do it again, the number just isn't that important and mine was right where all the online charts put it without me almost killing myself. Unless you are training for an elite event I just don't see the need for the test, not for the average Joe or Jane.

    All I know is that my HRmax as predicted by the age-old "220-age" formula is 166. I sometimes hit HRs in the low/mid 160s while running, with only a moderately high perceived exertion - I don't feel anywhere near like I'm going to blow up and can sustain it for 10-15 minutes (or more) at a time. So while I've never done a HRmax test (and don't plan to), I can be reasonably sure that mine is somewhere considerably above the predicted 166.

    I can see where accurate data for things like HRmax and LTHR would be relevant to competitive endurance athletes to help pace their training/races, but as you said, for the average Joe/Jane it's not terribly important. If you're seeing spots, gasping for breath and feel like your heart is going to explode out of your chest, you're probably at/near HRMax and need to slow down.

    True. It isn't as though I really need to know my high and low. I am working on endurance currently so I find monitoring my heart rate keeps me happy the whole run. If I let it get too high I'm tired and miserable by the end, too low and my pace is unnecessarily slow and I'll be out there all day. I find my perceived exertion harder to gauge, especially when I start getting tired or my asthma is acting up.
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,502 Member
    edited March 2017
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    My Garmin (Fenix 3 HR) shows RHR as follows:

    Avg. last 4 hrs. = 47
    Avg. last 7 days = 50

    ETA: I consume a high level of caffeine, which undoubtedly has an impact.
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,728 Member
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    58-65
  • faidwen
    faidwen Posts: 131 Member
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    Mine consistently now sits between 44 and 48, and pushes 100 when exercising vigorously.

    Of course, this is going from 310 lbs -> 160 lbs and now incorporating about 2-3 hours of exercise per day and 20,000 -> 30,000 steps :)

    My DR. says I need to eat more salt LOL (I sit around 1500 mg per day).

    I feel GREAT!!!!
  • KickassAmazon76
    KickassAmazon76 Posts: 4,637 Member
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    57-59 usually
  • Dominuslive
    Dominuslive Posts: 14 Member
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    My avg rhr is low to mid 40's. It has been as low as 35 though. My blood pressure was 90/57 which shocked dr's on a regular basis. After 2 stents my bp is about 105/75. So high for me.
  • Dominuslive
    Dominuslive Posts: 14 Member
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  • Dominuslive
    Dominuslive Posts: 14 Member
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    6c9ryg69l68d.png
    I guess my lowest was 30 bpm during heavy cycling season. Avg for the year is 44bpm
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
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    AnvilHead wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    A little derail, but how do you figure out your resting and max heart rate? I looked it up once, but I couldn't find my pulse. I have a chest HRM strap, no continual monitor. I like to use my heart rate for my runs, but the default Garmin zones seem low. Would I just throw on my strap first thing in the AM and start a fake activity to get my resting? How about max? I seem to hit my guestimated max HR during most runs. Does that seem right?
    @jennybearlv
    No that won't be your absolute maximum - you have to push to an extreme level, not a routine level.
    A ramp test for example where the speed increases steadily until you finally go anaerobic at the point of complete exhaustion.

    It's not something to undertake lightly!
    I did mine as part of a VO2 max test in a sports science lab, took 3 days to recover including suffering from exercise induced asthma.

    Just to put an exclamation point on this response, I did my own max HR test on a treadmill and I too was wiped out for three or four days. I will never do it again, the number just isn't that important and mine was right where all the online charts put it without me almost killing myself. Unless you are training for an elite event I just don't see the need for the test, not for the average Joe or Jane.

    All I know is that my HRmax as predicted by the age-old "220-age" formula is 166. I sometimes hit HRs in the low/mid 160s while running, with only a moderately high perceived exertion - I don't feel anywhere near like I'm going to blow up and can sustain it for 10-15 minutes (or more) at a time. So while I've never done a HRmax test (and don't plan to), I can be reasonably sure that mine is somewhere considerably above the predicted 166.

    I can see where accurate data for things like HRmax and LTHR would be relevant to competitive endurance athletes to help pace their training/races, but as you said, for the average Joe/Jane it's not terribly important. If you're seeing spots, gasping for breath and feel like your heart is going to explode out of your chest, you're probably at/near HRMax and need to slow down.

    True. It isn't as though I really need to know my high and low. I am working on endurance currently so I find monitoring my heart rate keeps me happy the whole run. If I let it get too high I'm tired and miserable by the end, too low and my pace is unnecessarily slow and I'll be out there all day. I find my perceived exertion harder to gauge, especially when I start getting tired or my asthma is acting up.

    Me too. So many things throw it off. Sometimes I'll be working pretty hard and get "in the zone" where I don't really feel the stress, and perceived exertion is really low. I feel it when I try to push harder, or my legs feel like jelly when I'm done. Or if I'm tired or sluggish, it'll feel like I'm working very hard at a moderate effort, until I get warmed up.
  • saintor1
    saintor1 Posts: 376 Member
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    My today's average is 58 (male 49yo, not overweight).
  • Motorsheen
    Motorsheen Posts: 20,506 Member
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    48
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
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    Mine is usually in the mid-70s.
  • mommarnurse
    mommarnurse Posts: 515 Member
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    Low 40's. When I was post op last weds for laparoscopy, the nurse said "you must exercise a lot". It was dipping to the high 30's.
  • FreyasRebirth
    FreyasRebirth Posts: 514 Member
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    My 4 week average is 65. My 7 day average is 67.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,735 Member
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    AnvilHead wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    A little derail, but how do you figure out your resting and max heart rate? I looked it up once, but I couldn't find my pulse. I have a chest HRM strap, no continual monitor. I like to use my heart rate for my runs, but the default Garmin zones seem low. Would I just throw on my strap first thing in the AM and start a fake activity to get my resting? How about max? I seem to hit my guestimated max HR during most runs. Does that seem right?
    @jennybearlv
    No that won't be your absolute maximum - you have to push to an extreme level, not a routine level.
    A ramp test for example where the speed increases steadily until you finally go anaerobic at the point of complete exhaustion.

    It's not something to undertake lightly!
    I did mine as part of a VO2 max test in a sports science lab, took 3 days to recover including suffering from exercise induced asthma.

    Just to put an exclamation point on this response, I did my own max HR test on a treadmill and I too was wiped out for three or four days. I will never do it again, the number just isn't that important and mine was right where all the online charts put it without me almost killing myself. Unless you are training for an elite event I just don't see the need for the test, not for the average Joe or Jane.

    All I know is that my HRmax as predicted by the age-old "220-age" formula is 166. I sometimes hit HRs in the low/mid 160s while running, with only a moderately high perceived exertion - I don't feel anywhere near like I'm going to blow up and can sustain it for 10-15 minutes (or more) at a time. So while I've never done a HRmax test (and don't plan to), I can be reasonably sure that mine is somewhere considerably above the predicted 166.

    I can see where accurate data for things like HRmax and LTHR would be relevant to competitive endurance athletes to help pace their training/races, but as you said, for the average Joe/Jane it's not terribly important. If you're seeing spots, gasping for breath and feel like your heart is going to explode out of your chest, you're probably at/near HRMax and need to slow down.

    True. It isn't as though I really need to know my high and low. I am working on endurance currently so I find monitoring my heart rate keeps me happy the whole run. If I let it get too high I'm tired and miserable by the end, too low and my pace is unnecessarily slow and I'll be out there all day. I find my perceived exertion harder to gauge, especially when I start getting tired or my asthma is acting up.

    There are submaximal test methods for estimating max heart rate, but I have no idea how accurate they are. Perhaps one of the exercise phys/kinesiology people here know. Seems like submax tests would almost have to be better than 220-age (or the other, mostly age-based, formulas) - they're pretty inaccurate/arbitrary - but that's just a guess.

    I did a rowing machine max test a few years back (when I was in my late 40s) and hit the low 180s. It tends not to decline much with age in people who stay vigorously active, and I've seen 180/181 pop up more recently on my HRM occasionally when going flat-out (tabata intervals, or somesuch).

    But 220-age would estimate 159 for me, not 180. If I used that for training zone estimation, I'd seriously under-train.

    Resting heart rate first thing in the morning (per HRM on waking) can be anything from high 40s to mid-50s. Mid-day resting runs around 60.

    Last summer, when I had cataract surgery, I repeatedly set off the low HR alarm in the surgical prep area (before sedatives) by dropping below 50. Finally resorted to waving my legs around in the air above the bed to keep it from happening - yeep! yeep! yeep! - so annoying. ;)
  • kbarrett0701
    kbarrett0701 Posts: 54 Member
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    39-55.

    15482907.png