Panera Bread's food is 100% clean

2

Replies

  • JohnnyPenso
    JohnnyPenso Posts: 412 Member
    I like Panera, but this type of shady marketing makes me avoid them.
    How is it shady if they define exactly what they mean and spell it out in black and white? Consumers are informed if they choose to take a few minutes and read. If consumers don't choose to read the caveats that's their problem.
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,147 Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    They do provide their own definition - no preservatives, no food coloring, no artificial sweeteners. I think that's it, but I may be missing something.

    That said, the whole advertising campaign just irritates the crap out of me. Anything that perpetuates the 'clean eating' nonsense does.

    ^^Was just about to post exactly this, but I took too long Googling it. They have defined it for their own restaurant. I think it's still crap.

    No artificial preservatives, sweeteners, colors and flavors is the official wording.

    So no diet sodas sold at Panera??
  • cbl40
    cbl40 Posts: 281 Member
    Panera is gross. Chicken tastes processed to me. I'm not convinced.
  • coreyreichle
    coreyreichle Posts: 1,039 Member
    How can they claim it? There's a billboard on my way home from work that says "100% of our food is 100% clean". I get irritated every time I see those claims, lol. How can they prove it, what exactly do they mean?

    Because they meet/exceed health department codes for clean food prep areas?
  • coreyreichle
    coreyreichle Posts: 1,039 Member
    cbl40 wrote: »
    Panera is gross. Chicken tastes processed to me. I'm not convinced.

    All chicken you eat is processed in some way. I highly doubt you are rending it from the carcass, fresh after being killed...
  • diannethegeek
    diannethegeek Posts: 14,776 Member
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    stealthq wrote: »
    They do provide their own definition - no preservatives, no food coloring, no artificial sweeteners. I think that's it, but I may be missing something.

    That said, the whole advertising campaign just irritates the crap out of me. Anything that perpetuates the 'clean eating' nonsense does.

    ^^Was just about to post exactly this, but I took too long Googling it. They have defined it for their own restaurant. I think it's still crap.

    No artificial preservatives, sweeteners, colors and flavors is the official wording.

    So no diet sodas sold at Panera??

    They seem to exclude things made off site, but I can't wait until you actually look at what's excluded and fine caffeine is there too.

    Idk why you're arguing with me. I didn't make up the rules. I just went out and found them since no one else seemed to want to.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited April 2017
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    stealthq wrote: »
    They do provide their own definition - no preservatives, no food coloring, no artificial sweeteners. I think that's it, but I may be missing something.

    That said, the whole advertising campaign just irritates the crap out of me. Anything that perpetuates the 'clean eating' nonsense does.

    ^^Was just about to post exactly this, but I took too long Googling it. They have defined it for their own restaurant. I think it's still crap.

    No artificial preservatives, sweeteners, colors and flavors is the official wording.

    So no diet sodas sold at Panera??

    They seem to exclude things made off site, but I can't wait until you actually look at what's excluded and fine caffeine is there too.

    Idk why you're arguing with me. I didn't make up the rules. I just went out and found them since no one else seemed to want to.

    I knew I'd read something from them on diet soda before, so found it (for the record, none of this is my opinion, just reporting):

    https://www.bevnet.com/news/2015/panera-bread-to-ax-artificial-ingredients-just-not-at-the-soda-fountain

    "In a call with BevNET, Jonathan Yohannan, the director of public relations for Panera Bread, stated that, for the time being, the No No List will not be extended to beverages sold at its stores. Yohannan noted that while Panera has made strides to remove certain ingredients from its bakery-based items — a process that began last year — the company’s list is “a start for us.”

    ...While many health advocates praised Panera’s decision to trim artificial additives from its prepared food, Michael Jacobson, the executive director of The Center for Science in the Public Interest, an influential watchdog group, questioned the restaurant chain’s exclusion of artificial additives found in Pepsi, Diet Pepsi and Mountain Dew, which Panera sells in bottle and fountain options.

    “Panera should have made clear that these improvements won’t happen at the soda fountain,” Jacobson said in a statement published on May 5. “Presumably the high-fructose corn syrup or the poorly tested sweetener acesulfame potassium will remain in the Pepsi and Diet Pepsi it sells; the same goes for the Yellow 5, the calcium disodium EDTA, and the brominated vegetable oil in its Mountain Dew.”

    However, Panera is examining ways to offer healthier beverage options, according to Amanda Cardosi, a public relations manager with the company. Replying to further inquiry, Cardosi wrote in an e-mail to BevNET that Panera is “on a journey to constantly improve, and a review of our beverages is on the list.” She noted that the company is “in discussions with our vendors to look at options that get us to a place with no high fructose corn syrup and more natural and low calorie sweeteners.”

    Cardosi pointed to Panera’s inclusion of tea, lemonade and orange juice as examples of beverages sold in its stores that are not made without artificial additives. The company also has “several bottled beverage options, teas and diet soda options for those who focus on added sugars in their diet,” she said.

    Bolstering its case to deliver on more better-for-you beverage options, Panera recently partnered with two organic beverage companies, having added Purity Organic’s Strawberry Paradise Juice to its menu in approximately 1,800 locations nationwide and testing Harmless Harvest’s 100% Raw Coconut Water in 140 stores. Purity’s strawberry-flavored juice drink does pack 270 calories and 63 grams of sugar per 16.9 oz bottle, but its organic formulation (organic strawberry puree, organic lemon juice concentrate) and 20 percent juice content, is likely to find some fans at Panera. Meanwhile, Harmless Harvest’s 8 oz. bottle of coconut water is currently being sold at Panera locations in North Carolina, South Carolina, upstate New York, Massachusetts and California."
  • PaulaWallaDingDong
    PaulaWallaDingDong Posts: 4,635 Member
    I like Panera, but this type of shady marketing makes me avoid them.
    How is it shady if they define exactly what they mean and spell it out in black and white? Consumers are informed if they choose to take a few minutes and read. If consumers don't choose to read the caveats that's their problem.

    They define it, sure, but who are they really reaching, by and large? People who like a halo floating above their fast food.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    I think "clean" is an annoying marketing term, but find the Westin's promotion of their in-room-dining "SuperFoods" even more ridiculous.

    (SuperFoods=oranges, blueberries, apples, tomatoes, soy, broccoli, nuts, oats, yogurt, salmon -- all fine foods, but please.)
  • cbl40
    cbl40 Posts: 281 Member
    cbl40 wrote: »
    Panera is gross. Chicken tastes processed to me. I'm not convinced.

    All chicken you eat is processed in some way. I highly doubt you are rending it from the carcass, fresh after being killed...

    True. But, I'd rather buy organic, minimally processed chicken than the plastic tasting chicken at Panera.
  • ndj1979
    ndj1979 Posts: 29,147 Member
    cbl40 wrote: »
    cbl40 wrote: »
    Panera is gross. Chicken tastes processed to me. I'm not convinced.

    All chicken you eat is processed in some way. I highly doubt you are rending it from the carcass, fresh after being killed...

    True. But, I'd rather buy organic, minimally processed chicken than the plastic tasting chicken at Panera.

    Never understood how one form of processing is better than another
  • karahm78
    karahm78 Posts: 491 Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    They do provide their own definition - no preservatives, no food coloring, no artificial sweeteners. I think that's it, but I may be missing something.

    That said, the whole advertising campaign just irritates the crap out of me. Anything that perpetuates the 'clean eating' nonsense does.

    ^^Was just about to post exactly this, but I took too long Googling it. They have defined it for their own restaurant. I think it's still crap.

    No artificial preservatives, sweeteners, colors and flavors is the official wording.
    5549107d9991f.preview.jpg?resize=620%2C803

    Regarding the discussion surrounding diet Soda, this list specifically calls out "food" and doesn't mention beverages
  • kavahni
    kavahni Posts: 313 Member
    No floor sweepings.
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,360 Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    They do provide their own definition - no preservatives, no food coloring, no artificial sweeteners. I think that's it, but I may be missing something.

    That said, the whole advertising campaign just irritates the crap out of me. Anything that perpetuates the 'clean eating' nonsense does.

    ^^Was just about to post exactly this, but I took too long Googling it. They have defined it for their own restaurant. I think it's still crap.

    No artificial preservatives, sweeteners, colors and flavors is the official wording.
    5549107d9991f.preview.jpg?resize=620%2C803

    They should have made up a few more "unclean" things to demonize. They missed the letters I, J, K, O, Q, R, U, and W-Z in the alphabet. 4/10 would not read again, not enough bogeymen hiding under the bed.
  • MelissaPhippsFeagins
    MelissaPhippsFeagins Posts: 8,064 Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    They do provide their own definition - no preservatives, no food coloring, no artificial sweeteners. I think that's it, but I may be missing something.

    That said, the whole advertising campaign just irritates the crap out of me. Anything that perpetuates the 'clean eating' nonsense does.

    You left out no GMO and locally sourced, if possible.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    And no lard, even if locally-sourced and from organically-fed pigs, I guess.

    But yeah, they made up their own definition and provided it, which is better than pretending like everyone knows what they mean. STILL a stupid term for food, but whatever.
  • kclaar11
    kclaar11 Posts: 162 Member
    As someone with a marketing background, this is actually great planning on their part. Is it basically meaningless nonsense? Of course it is. However, they found the buzzword of the day that will stick with a large audience. Almost have to applaud them for beating others to the punch
  • French_Peasant
    French_Peasant Posts: 1,638 Member
    kclaar11 wrote: »
    As someone with a marketing background, this is actually great planning on their part. Is it basically meaningless nonsense? Of course it is. However, they found the buzzword of the day that will stick with a large audience. Almost have to applaud them for beating others to the punch

    I agree--they are owning this nonsense like a boss. I think the "clean" concept is going to stick around for a couple of years, so they have a campaign that has legs. I went out and read some of the coverage in Ad Age, and apparently getting their entire menu and resources to where they want them to be has been a grueling two year process, so they have put their money where their mouth is.
  • malibu927
    malibu927 Posts: 17,568 Member
    The worst part about this whole "clean" business is they really changed their chicken Caesar salad. No more asiago cheese and the dressing isn't as good.
  • 3rdof7sisters
    3rdof7sisters Posts: 486 Member
    kclaar11 wrote: »
    As someone with a marketing background, this is actually great planning on their part. Is it basically meaningless nonsense? Of course it is. However, they found the buzzword of the day that will stick with a large audience. Almost have to applaud them for beating others to the punch

    Exactly right, a buzzword, used to hook some people.
    But, then again, what does it mean to anyone. There are multiple topics here about it almost daily.