Not eating enough, lesson learned

Well, i think I found out why I was not losing and even gaining at times, I was not eating enough. I was eating 1000 calories below the highest weight loss setting in my fitness pall. For weeks I was not losing weight and I had no idea why i lost a lot when I starting cutting lower but it stalled. So, I am trying to eat my full recommended intake and after eating so few calories it feels indulgent lol. It worked and am losing weight gain, I guess I was curing to low and my body felt like it was starving.

Lesson learned.
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Replies

  • jardane1
    jardane1 Posts: 58 Member
    toxikon wrote: »
    Starvation mode is a myth - the fewer calories you eat, the more weight you will lose. Period.

    There are a few things that might've prevented you from losing weight, and it's not "starvation mode":
    - Inaccurate tracking (not using a food scale, not using reliable MFP database entries, forgetting to log)
    - Water weight (from starting a new exercise routine, consuming a lot of salt, etc.)
    - Constipation
    - Normal weight fluctuations (weight goes up and down due to all kinds of causes, so if you weigh yourself on the 'wrong' day you could think you're not losing)
    - Unreliable bathroom scale

    With that said - the goal of weight loss is creating sustainable habits, not crash dieting. Your body needs a certain amount of nutrients (based on your gender, weight, height, activity level) and if you don't get enough of those nutrients, you can have some nasty side effects, like losing your hair or passing out.

    The goal of losing weight should always be slow and steady - eat enough calories to feel good (not ravenous all the time), and lose 0.5-2lbs a week (once again, depending on your gender, height, weight and activity level).

    I disagree with you but thanks for the comment.
  • Seattleovercast
    Seattleovercast Posts: 23 Member
    The same thing happened to me. I had my calories set high when I first started counting and the weight was dropping off. I was eating the same foods, and working out the same. When I dropped my calorie goal my weight slowed and then stopped all together. I was still eating the same healthy foods, exercising the same amount but the weight wouldn't come off. Once I bumped it back up to my initial calorie goal, the weight started coming off again!
  • T0M_K
    T0M_K Posts: 7,526 Member
    jardane1 wrote: »
    Tomk652015 wrote: »
    The same thing happened to me. I had my calories set high when I first started counting and the weight was dropping off. I was eating the same foods, and working out the same. When I dropped my calorie goal my weight slowed and then stopped all together. I was still eating the same healthy foods, exercising the same amount but the weight wouldn't come off. Once I bumped it back up to my initial calorie goal, the weight started coming off again!

    something else at play here to cause that. the greater the calorie deficit you are under, the more you will lose. its just simple math. there are a lot of factors but math is math. caveat....you have to do the math correctly.

    The human body is complex, it's not just math.

    well what would it be then? the question is what makes your body lose weight? I pose that burning (by whatever means) more energy than you consume. example, your TDEE is 2500 cals, You consume 1500, your deficit is 1000. over time, your weight drops faster than if your TDEE is 2500 and you consume 2000 with a deficit of 500. See..math.
  • Seattleovercast
    Seattleovercast Posts: 23 Member
    edited June 2017
    jardane1 wrote: »
    Tomk652015 wrote: »
    The same thing happened to me. I had my calories set high when I first started counting and the weight was dropping off. I was eating the same foods, and working out the same. When I dropped my calorie goal my weight slowed and then stopped all together. I was still eating the same healthy foods, exercising the same amount but the weight wouldn't come off. Once I bumped it back up to my initial calorie goal, the weight started coming off again!

    something else at play here to cause that. the greater the calorie deficit you are under, the more you will lose. its just simple math. there are a lot of factors but math is math. caveat....you have to do the math correctly.

    The human body is complex, it's not just math.

    Out of curiosity, did you ever struggle with binge eating?
    Edit: Before you were calorie counting on a consistent basis?
  • MindyG150
    MindyG150 Posts: 1,293 Member
    Great thread peoples...
    I will add this, the plateau thing....that gets tricky for me sometimes. I lost a lot in the beginning and then slowed wwaayy down. Once I added a different type of exercise in it all picked up again...and kept the monotony at bay.