Fatorexia: Is it a thing?

Hungry_Shopgirl
Hungry_Shopgirl Posts: 329 Member
edited July 2017 in Health and Weight Loss
So I just came across the term in a blog post and had never heard of it before. A google search brought this up: dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1267883/Fatorexia-In-mirror-Sara-saw-slim-woman-Just-problem-17st-So-deluded.html

In a nutshell, she describes it as "Though still fat, you think you are slim and exhibit all the reverse traits of anorexia."

Have you guys heard of it before? Do you think it's a real thing?
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Replies

  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    Apparently a made up word in the title of a book:

    http://www.cosmopolitan.co.za/health-fitness/body-health/fatorexia
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,728 Member
    Positive self image? Probably
    Denial? Certainly
    A mental disorder? No!

  • 43501
    43501 Posts: 85 Member
    So I just came across the term in a blog post and had never heard of it before. A google search brought this up: dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1267883/Fatorexia-In-mirror-Sara-saw-slim-woman-Just-problem-17st-So-deluded.html

    In a nutshell, she describes it as "Though still fat, you think you are slim and exhibit all the reverse traits of anorexia."

    Have you guys heard of it before? Do you think it's a real thing?

    I don't know if this is actually the same thing, because it sounds like the article is a mental health issue and not a conscious choice, but it kinda reminds me of the death fatty movement. There are a lot of obese people out there (calling themselves "deathfats", apparently to poke fun at the term "morbidly obese") who take the whole "health at any size" concept entirely too far by claiming that being severely overweight doesn't come with health complications and that all the studies that show otherwise are the works of biased "fatphobic" health professionals who have deeply internalized fat hate.

    I once had a "friend" who was a proud self-described death fatty. She was so large she needed mobility aids to get around because her knees were starting to give up. She absolutely denied the possibility that the weight was the issue and said it was just "bad knees and fibro". We aren't friends anymore.
  • Alatariel75
    Alatariel75 Posts: 17,939 Member
    I think this minimises the seriousness of anorexia. So she cut the tags out of clothes and never looked in a mirror. Denialist and potentially a bit delusional. She's just trying to sell books.
  • cs2thecox
    cs2thecox Posts: 533 Member
    1) Daily Fail
    2) Clearly promotion for her book

    I'm just proud I resisted the sidebar of shame today!
  • dutchandkiwi
    dutchandkiwi Posts: 1,389 Member
    Daily Fail as mentioned often already Not worth even reading
    Their business model is built on making women feel embarassed about their body harassing women and lying
  • rianneonamission
    rianneonamission Posts: 854 Member
    She's not looked in a full length mirror for years...?

    That's ignorance. Not fatorexia, not body dismorphia, just plain ignorance.

    I actually find it rather distasteful that she (mis)uses those strong mental health terms to describe herself.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    I think this minimises the seriousness of anorexia. So she cut the tags out of clothes and never looked in a mirror. Denialist and potentially a bit delusional. She's just trying to sell books.

    This.

    I do think some people are in denial or have bizarrely inflated egos or the like, but not that it's an ED akin to anorexia.

    And yeah, Daily Mail.
  • chelllsea124
    chelllsea124 Posts: 336 Member
    Um..... what.
  • jseams1234
    jseams1234 Posts: 1,213 Member
    Body dysmorphia is pretty prevalent in the fitness/bodybuilding world. Heck, I may have it myself, according to my dear wife. I'm 225# at 6'1 and I still see nothing but a skinny dude in the mirror. I still feel like people look at me and are thinking "damn, that dude is too skinny". I'm not kidding.

    I intellectually "know" that I'm not small but what I see in the mirror is something different. It's part of what keeps me going to the gym and lifting. ;)

    This just sounds like some variant - I wonder how many formerly overly "skinny" people, especially men suffer from this.
  • jennybearlv
    jennybearlv Posts: 1,519 Member
    I think calling it fatorexia is insensitive, but body dysmorphia absolutely goes both ways. I believe I experience a mild form. If I didn't own a scale and know my BMI chart by heart I would believe I am much thinner than I really am. I have to take my measurements before buying clothes because I'll buy clothes a couple sizes too small and think they look fine. I've always had a full length mirror and have never been able to see the gains unless they were very large and sudden. I think I'm struggling to stick to my diet after losing 60 pounds, I'm still 80 overweight, because I honestly can't see where I need to lose more weight from.

    That lady in the story sounds a little different though. Like she is cutting out tags and avoiding mirrors because she just doesn't want to believe she is obese. Sounds more like denial to me.
  • susanmc31
    susanmc31 Posts: 287 Member
    I get what it's saying - I would just call it "denial" to be honest. Even "body dysmorphia" is too strong.

    A lot of people 'have' this - they think they're a fine weight but candid photos etc. tell a different story.

    This is me to a 'T', I was in severe denial of my size and if I looked in my mirror I was fine but when I looked in the mirror with someone next to me (eg. at work my co-workers and I were all walking past floor to ceiling mirrors) I am shocked at how much bigger I was compared to them. I just thought I was the same size as them. It was/is total denial. I figured since I went to the gym everyday that the scale was lying - nope it was me lying to myself. I'm getting better now - over 40 pounds lost but still 50 to go.