Any cross-fitters??

24

Replies

  • rybo
    rybo Posts: 5,430 Member
    RandJ6280 wrote: »
    Teach me oh wise ones. I'm 55 and I am 5'8" 226lbs, and it's NOT muscle. lol.
    I have not done any workouts in over a year, in this last year.... I've put on 25lbs.
    Sounds like I need to get in shape before I step foot into a cross fit box.

    Looking for a good starting plan on starting my weight loss and getting healthy.

    Add me and help.

    Definitely don't need to get in shape first. My brother was greatly concerned about that. He finally started his ramp up classes this week
  • Xfitgrl7
    Xfitgrl7 Posts: 3 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    I'm about a week into starting crossfit, and I'm liking it so far!

    One thing I have noticed though (coming from powerlifting/bodybuilding) is that certain movements aren't emphasized enough for most people to get very good at them.
    Our strength portion yesterday, for example, was bench press cluster sets - 3x1x3 @ 90%. Bench press is a movement I would typically train 1-2 times a week, whereas it might come up once a month in a WOD? I noticed many of the other women were not very good with bench press, I assume because they don't practice it often. I know benching isn't really a super important skill for crossfitters, but I think the same principle applies for most of the heavier lifts. (I know it will be hard for me to learn the Oly lifts when we only work on them sporadically.)
    I have no doubt I'll get in better shape and build strength, but I'm hoping to find a good balance between crossfit and some type of structured gym routine like I'm used to.

    Hence why crossfit gets a bad rep. That along with coaches can virtually buy their certification in the matter of hours.

    Many considered it random exercising instead of training because not enough frequency to improve strength optimally.

    I'm not downing crossfit, I think it's popularity has done wonders for the lifting community, I'm just pointing out some of the main flaws in general that raises eyebrows.

    I agree crossfit does get a bad rap because it's not designed for people to get "good" or "better" at lifting. It's constantly, varied, functional movements. Although I do question why I would EVER need to do a handstand pushup
  • MilesAddie
    MilesAddie Posts: 166 Member
    Second time at Crossfit here. I was a member for two years back in 2011-12, then came up with some life excuses, had a kid, let it slide. Been back at it for 4 months now and hating myself for having left.

    Love everything about it. I absolutely hate doing traditional cardio, and I get bored at the gym. I love competitive sports, but I can't find a game on my lunch break. I just moved to a new city, I've made great friends. But most importantly, i want to go. I look forward to it.

    And yeah, great results. Scale doesn't move quick, but when it starts the weight just falls off. Pull-ups get so much easier after you've lost 25 lbs.
  • not_a_runner
    not_a_runner Posts: 1,343 Member
    Xfitgrl7 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    I'm about a week into starting crossfit, and I'm liking it so far!

    One thing I have noticed though (coming from powerlifting/bodybuilding) is that certain movements aren't emphasized enough for most people to get very good at them.
    Our strength portion yesterday, for example, was bench press cluster sets - 3x1x3 @ 90%. Bench press is a movement I would typically train 1-2 times a week, whereas it might come up once a month in a WOD? I noticed many of the other women were not very good with bench press, I assume because they don't practice it often. I know benching isn't really a super important skill for crossfitters, but I think the same principle applies for most of the heavier lifts. (I know it will be hard for me to learn the Oly lifts when we only work on them sporadically.)
    I have no doubt I'll get in better shape and build strength, but I'm hoping to find a good balance between crossfit and some type of structured gym routine like I'm used to.

    Hence why crossfit gets a bad rep. That along with coaches can virtually buy their certification in the matter of hours.

    Many considered it random exercising instead of training because not enough frequency to improve strength optimally.

    I'm not downing crossfit, I think it's popularity has done wonders for the lifting community, I'm just pointing out some of the main flaws in general that raises eyebrows.

    I agree crossfit does get a bad rap because it's not designed for people to get "good" or "better" at lifting. It's constantly, varied, functional movements. Although I do question why I would EVER need to do a handstand pushup

    But as also mentioned upthread, some of the movements are pretty technical. To ask me to preform, say, snatch sets @ 90% and not work with me on getting "better" at snatches seems kind of... silly...?
  • not_a_runner
    not_a_runner Posts: 1,343 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    I'm about a week into starting crossfit, and I'm liking it so far!

    One thing I have noticed though (coming from powerlifting/bodybuilding) is that certain movements aren't emphasized enough for most people to get very good at them.
    Our strength portion yesterday, for example, was bench press cluster sets - 3x1x3 @ 90%. Bench press is a movement I would typically train 1-2 times a week, whereas it might come up once a month in a WOD? I noticed many of the other women were not very good with bench press, I assume because they don't practice it often. I know benching isn't really a super important skill for crossfitters, but I think the same principle applies for most of the heavier lifts. (I know it will be hard for me to learn the Oly lifts when we only work on them sporadically.)
    I have no doubt I'll get in better shape and build strength, but I'm hoping to find a good balance between crossfit and some type of structured gym routine like I'm used to.

    Hence why crossfit gets a bad rep. That along with coaches can virtually buy their certification in the matter of hours.

    Many considered it random exercising instead of training because not enough frequency to improve strength optimally.

    I'm not downing crossfit, I think it's popularity has done wonders for the lifting community, I'm just pointing out some of the main flaws in general that raises eyebrows.

    Agree. It really isn't "training" per se.
    Training to me is planned and controlled, focus on form and progression. Doing a heavy bench once a month isn't training my bench, it's basically testing it and hoping the other random things I've done since then made it better.

    Will people gain some strength via regular resistance training and get in better cardiovascular shape? Sure. And if people are happy with that, good on them. But you can't train towards anything with no structure.
    There's a reason I'm a better bencher than all the women at my gym, and it's because I train my bench press.

    If the goal is not to get better at things, what is the goal exactly?
    Like I said I am enjoying it, but it seems like most of the workouts are more testing abilities and conditioning.
  • kimothy38
    kimothy38 Posts: 840 Member
    I'm getting good results with my trainer but he's leaving in a few months. I'm sad already. Plan B is to start crossfit after he goes cause I love a challenge & need the camaraderie. After reading this thread I think its the right way for me to go.
  • rybo
    rybo Posts: 5,430 Member
    Xfitgrl7 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    I'm about a week into starting crossfit, and I'm liking it so far!

    One thing I have noticed though (coming from powerlifting/bodybuilding) is that certain movements aren't emphasized enough for most people to get very good at them.
    Our strength portion yesterday, for example, was bench press cluster sets - 3x1x3 @ 90%. Bench press is a movement I would typically train 1-2 times a week, whereas it might come up once a month in a WOD? I noticed many of the other women were not very good with bench press, I assume because they don't practice it often. I know benching isn't really a super important skill for crossfitters, but I think the same principle applies for most of the heavier lifts. (I know it will be hard for me to learn the Oly lifts when we only work on them sporadically.)
    I have no doubt I'll get in better shape and build strength, but I'm hoping to find a good balance between crossfit and some type of structured gym routine like I'm used to.

    Hence why crossfit gets a bad rep. That along with coaches can virtually buy their certification in the matter of hours.

    Many considered it random exercising instead of training because not enough frequency to improve strength optimally.

    I'm not downing crossfit, I think it's popularity has done wonders for the lifting community, I'm just pointing out some of the main flaws in general that raises eyebrows.

    I agree crossfit does get a bad rap because it's not designed for people to get "good" or "better" at lifting. It's constantly, varied, functional movements. Although I do question why I would EVER need to do a handstand pushup

    But as also mentioned upthread, some of the movements are pretty technical. To ask me to preform, say, snatch sets @ 90% and not work with me on getting "better" at snatches seems kind of... silly...?

    It is box dependant. If someone at my box is new and a heavy technical movement is programmed they will be told to just work on form and practice.
  • ISweat4This
    ISweat4This Posts: 653 Member
    Yes, I love Crossfit. I've been doing it for two years my progress doesn't compare to 15yrs in they gym. Couldn't go back!
  • cbrealtor55
    cbrealtor55 Posts: 37 Member
    Rybo is spot on. All boxes are not the same. Crossfit is planned and programmed but every box is not the same. If you are not getting proper coaching on lifts, I would look at other boxes.

    The reason why you don't bench a lot in Crossfit is because it's not considered a bench mark lift. Pull ups, squats, deadlift, snatch and clean & jerk are benchmarks for Crossfit. Of course the ladies..Fran etc. Asking a CF their Fran time is like asking regular gym person how much they bench.
  • jmweiner1
    jmweiner1 Posts: 5 Member
    edited August 2017
    Love love love Crossfit I am a 57 YO unathletic female. At times I do feel bad that I am literally the worst person in class. But then I don't give a
  • Penthesilea514
    Penthesilea514 Posts: 1,189 Member
    jmweiner1 wrote: »
    Love love love Crossfit I am a 57 YO unathletic female. At times I do feel bad that I am literally the worst person in class. But then I don't give a

    Everyone starts somewhere! You found something you love, stick with it, and don't compare yourself to others, just yourself :smiley:
  • johnny_19
    johnny_19 Posts: 32 Member
    Loving this thread. Making me excited for my class on the 26th. It's an introductory class where they show you the proper movements I guess?

    Question for the experienced and the beginners... when you started, how often did you go? And how often do you go now? Want to get into it, but not over-exert myself. I'd be interested in hearing everyone's takes.

    Thanks :)
  • MikeinNOLA
    MikeinNOLA Posts: 91 Member
    johnny_19 wrote: »
    Loving this thread. Making me excited for my class on the 26th. It's an introductory class where they show you the proper movements I guess?

    Question for the experienced and the beginners... when you started, how often did you go? And how often do you go now? Want to get into it, but not over-exert myself. I'd be interested in hearing everyone's takes.

    Thanks :)

    When I started I went three days a week, but I was in a half marathon prep and running 4 days a week too.

    after 3 years, I'm I the gym 6 days a week with at least 3 days of 3 miles or more as well.

    Your 'programming should support you being there 5-6 days a week. That's the constantly varied part. Do expect to be sore, but the best way to rid of soreness is to go do more squats. ;)

    In all honesty, consistent attendance makes the most gains, but when your body is tired, it's a good day to scale, mobilize or do some active recovery, or hell, even just take a rest day!
  • MilesAddie
    MilesAddie Posts: 166 Member
    @johnny_19

    When I restarted, I went for three days a week, and in between days I did some active recovery stuff. A lot of walking, mobility work, foam rolling. I think for most people that start, 3 days will be enough for the first 6 weeks to get used to the intensity and allow for good recovery. In fact , you might want to think about hopping on Amazon and picking up a decent foam roller, you can find plenty of how-to's on line.

    After a month though, you'll probably become hooked like most of us and end up coming 5 or 6 days a week.
  • rybo
    rybo Posts: 5,430 Member
    johnny_19 wrote: »
    Loving this thread. Making me excited for my class on the 26th. It's an introductory class where they show you the proper movements I guess?

    Question for the experienced and the beginners... when you started, how often did you go? And how often do you go now? Want to get into it, but not over-exert myself. I'd be interested in hearing everyone's takes.

    Thanks :)

    3x a week should be good. Progressing from there will depend on other factors. Your individual fitness and ability to recover, how you scale & the programming offered, and if you do anything outside of crossfit (running, etc)
  • johnny_19
    johnny_19 Posts: 32 Member
    Thanks @MikeinNOLA @MilesAddie and @rybo that helps a lot!
  • samthepanda
    samthepanda Posts: 569 Member
    I'm trying but still not sure its right for me at the moment. I have anxiety issues at the moment and while I like the exercise I'm not good at partner work because I'm very uncoordinated, and I worry about holding other people up. Went to Met con last night and considering going to crossfit tonight but due to my anxieties I sometimes find it really hard to even speak and when there are a lot of people its overwhelming. No-one has ever been mean to me but I rarely feel confident I know what i'm doing
  • antennachick
    antennachick Posts: 464 Member
    johnny_19 wrote: »
    Loving this thread. Making me excited for my class on the 26th. It's an introductory class where they show you the proper movements I guess?

    Question for the experienced and the beginners... when you started, how often did you go? And how often do you go now? Want to get into it, but not over-exert myself. I'd be interested in hearing everyone's takes.

    Thanks :)

    I was one of those crazy people that did 6 days per week first thing...BUT I feel that when I go less, maybe 3 days a week, I push myself more. When I go everyday, sometimes I am sore from the day before so I modify or do something different, less weight, ect. On the other side, I hated missing the other days and missing lifts. I also feel like I am more sore on days off then i go to crossfit.
    I think 3 days per week is a great start and see how it works for you. I know alot of long term crossfitters that only do 3 days per week
  • johnny_19
    johnny_19 Posts: 32 Member
    Thanks @antennachick! Really helpful info! :)
  • giantrobot_powerlifting
    giantrobot_powerlifting Posts: 2,600 Member
    I'm a full time powerlifter (as full time as anyone can be as an amateur athlete) and a part time Crossfitter. I've been experimenting with CF for the last year, but until recently I've decided to make a two day per week commitment to Crossfit -- in addition to training as a powerlifter 3x a week. I won't go into all the reasons why I've added CF into my programming, but I've incorporated Crossfit mostly for corrective purposes and to increase endurance. Powerlifting training is very specificed: squat, bench press, deadlift -- everything else is an accessory. Early returns has my body feeling pretty good and it's nice to breakup ito the grind of powerlifting and learn new physical skills.