Strict Diet!

2

Replies

  • Dozer8814
    Dozer8814 Posts: 29 Member
    Dozer8814 wrote: »
    htimpaired wrote: »
    Is there a medical condition for this? what experience does your doctor have with nutrition? or did they refer you to a dietician?

    Yes. And I did meet with the nutritionist and this is the diet he set up for me.

    find a registered dietitian as they know more and have to go to school longer(as well as be licensed to practiced and they are backed my the AMA). nutritionists arent schooled enough and in most states dont even need a license to practice.

    Thanks! He has. I am in the nursing program that he was in and know a lot of the same teachers he had and he's great! Idk the problem with low carb and low calorie? I'm confident in the decision that my primary care provider, nutritionist, and I have decided. Thank you though!
  • Dozer8814
    Dozer8814 Posts: 29 Member
    TeaBea wrote: »
    Dozer8814 wrote: »
    Hello! I am looking for friends to join me on this journey. Some that I can share recipes and interact with online. I have been put on a strict low cal, low carb, low sodium, and low sugar diet. I am 25 and my goal is to lose 80+lbs! Looking forward to getting to know everyone!

    Do do a "diet".....instead change how you eat.

    What I mean is eliminating foods can result in weight loss BUT then you get to maintenance and need to develop a second strategy to keep the weight off.

    Losing weight is just step #1. Use this time to learn about your eating habits and make some permanent changes. Then you will be ready for step #2 (maintenance).

    Measure & log "regular" food, but be accountable. Manage portions and you manage calories. People lose weight while eating carbs, taking in sodium, and enjoying a sweet treat now & then. These people lose weight because they are eating fewer calories.

    Understandable! Just working to become healthier and lose some pounds just as everyone is! But due to some medical problems I face, I have a strict diet I need to be following! Thank you!
  • Dozer8814
    Dozer8814 Posts: 29 Member
    dwilliamca wrote: »
    Eat healthy, balanced meals. You don't say how "low carb" you plan on doing. Some people love it, but it isn't the diet for everyone. You can lose the same amount of weight sticking by the USDA recommendations as long as you stay under your calorie limit. Typically low carb means high fat.....which is higher in calories than carbs so it is a double edged sword. I'd start out keeping my sugar under my daily goal, eat mostly good carbs like fruit, vegetables and grain, whole foods when you can, and see how you do. If in a few weeks you think you might benefit from fewer carbs then adjust your numbers slightly. Plenty of protein either way is important as well as plenty of micronutrients. Watch your sodium levels, although I find it hard to do.

    Thank you so much for the advice!!! I appreciate it!
  • CharlieBeansmomTracey
    CharlieBeansmomTracey Posts: 7,702 Member
    Dozer8814 wrote: »
    Dozer8814 wrote: »
    htimpaired wrote: »
    Is there a medical condition for this? what experience does your doctor have with nutrition? or did they refer you to a dietician?

    Yes. And I did meet with the nutritionist and this is the diet he set up for me.

    find a registered dietitian as they know more and have to go to school longer(as well as be licensed to practiced and they are backed my the AMA). nutritionists arent schooled enough and in most states dont even need a license to practice.

    Thanks! He has. I am in the nursing program that he was in and know a lot of the same teachers he had and he's great! Idk the problem with low carb and low calorie? I'm confident in the decision that my primary care provider, nutritionist, and I have decided. Thank you though!

    how low calorie though? low carb I can see if since you are diabetic. but low calorie isnt needed. a calorie deficit of course is. but it depends on what you mean by low calorie. as for a nursing program, I dont know if you are in The US or not but here you wont learn much about nutrition or dieting,unless you are going through school to become a registered dietitian. if you arent in the US then I dont know what goes on in nursing school.
  • GaleHawkins
    GaleHawkins Posts: 8,161 Member
    Dozer8814 wrote: »
    Dozer8814 wrote: »
    htimpaired wrote: »
    Is there a medical condition for this? what experience does your doctor have with nutrition? or did they refer you to a dietician?

    Yes. And I did meet with the nutritionist and this is the diet he set up for me.

    find a registered dietitian as they know more and have to go to school longer(as well as be licensed to practiced and they are backed my the AMA). nutritionists arent schooled enough and in most states dont even need a license to practice.

    Thanks! He has. I am in the nursing program that he was in and know a lot of the same teachers he had and he's great! Idk the problem with low carb and low calorie? I'm confident in the decision that my primary care provider, nutritionist, and I have decided. Thank you though!

    @Dozer8814 it sounds like you have a great team of doctors and health care providers supporting you. It is a learning curve to all new WAYS OF EATING and you seem to be on the right track to better health and quality of life.

    Best of success.
  • jondspen
    jondspen Posts: 253 Member
    I have problems with lactose and gluten, so while the fat and some carbs (rice) are ok, I have pretty much went to a meat and veg diet. I would say the only bad part of it is breakfast, but fruits and an egg white aren't too bad once you get use to them. I like to keep raw broccoli and sugar snap peas with hummus around to snack on when I get the urge to cheat. Supper can be meat and veggies, or spruce up a salad with a small amount of a very taste intensive cheese (feta), add in your meat, and low fat/cal dressing (I usually just prefer to go with olive oil and a spash of rice wine vinegar with chicken or shrimp, balsamic with beef). You could also add in pico, and make it a Mexican salad, just no tortilla chips.

    Getting off the carbs was hard at first (I really love bread), but of the 4 listed, I would guess cheating on this would be the least worse thing you could do, esp if it is just a little and they are healthy carbs (rice cakes or whole grain crackers to replace croutons for example). I'm assuming low doesn't mean none. I'm by no means saying you should disregard your doctor, but you're body is going to be screaming at you until you get into the groove with the new diet...and IMHO it's better to cheat a little with healthy substitutes in this area, than fall off the wagon completely and disregard everything - esp the fat, sugar, calories.
  • try2again
    try2again Posts: 3,564 Member
    I've been following this discussion and just want to point something out. While I always put a disclaimer in there that you should defer to your doctor, I think it's important to understand *why* your doctor specified low-carb. Was he just spouting the standard advice based on the assumption that you eat too much bread & pasta and in the interest of you losing weight fast, or is it specifically to target something related to your diabetes? (I don't know much about diabetes.) If it's the first one, there's really no reason for it (although many find empty carbs the most expendable when trying to limit calories). In either case, if you aren't going to be able to stick with it because it's too restrictive, it's not going to help. But I do hope you can commit to whatever needs done to get your health under control. Wish you the best :)
  • Jancandoit7
    Jancandoit7 Posts: 350 Member
    Triple Zero Greek yogurt is good with any berries- all berries are low carb/low sugar compared to other fruits-maybe low sugar/carb protein shakes? I like "Orgain organic vanilla plant protein powder"- can mix with berries/yogurt too-
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    With respect, your doctor sounds very arbitrary. Fruit sugar is still sugar. It's not magically not a carb because it comes in fruit. Some diabetics are spiked severely by fruit sugars and some are not. The only way to find out is to test your own blood glucose after every meal until you learn your own tolerances.

    Losing weight does help some people with insulin resistance. What helped me the most was exercising after meals. My A1c was 11 when I was diagnosed and is now 4.7.

    Good luck to you!
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    try2again wrote: »
    I've been following this discussion and just want to point something out. While I always put a disclaimer in there that you should defer to your doctor, I think it's important to understand *why* your doctor specified low-carb. Was he just spouting the standard advice based on the assumption that you eat too much bread & pasta and in the interest of you losing weight fast, or is it specifically to target something related to your diabetes? (I don't know much about diabetes.) If it's the first one, there's really no reason for it (although many find empty carbs the most expendable when trying to limit calories). In either case, if you aren't going to be able to stick with it because it's too restrictive, it's not going to help. But I do hope you can commit to whatever needs done to get your health under control. Wish you the best :)

    Type 2 Diabetes is a disease of insulin resistance - the pancreas and liver don't work together properly to process glucose, which is made from carbs. So yes, it's very important for type 2 diabetics to limit carbs. How much they need to limit carbs is a matter of contention, with the ADA recommending no more than 60g per meal and 150g per day net carbs, and some doctors such as Bernstein recommending a strict low carb diet without even fruit.

    On the diabetes support forum here, I have friends with well controlled type 2 who eat high, low, and moderate carb diets. The most important thing is learning your own tolerances and "eating to the meter."
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    edited October 2017
    jondspen wrote: »
    I have problems with lactose and gluten, so while the fat and some carbs (rice) are ok, I have pretty much went to a meat and veg diet. I would say the only bad part of it is breakfast, but fruits and an egg white aren't too bad once you get use to them. I like to keep raw broccoli and sugar snap peas with hummus around to snack on when I get the urge to cheat. Supper can be meat and veggies, or spruce up a salad with a small amount of a very taste intensive cheese (feta), add in your meat, and low fat/cal dressing (I usually just prefer to go with olive oil and a spash of rice wine vinegar with chicken or shrimp, balsamic with beef). You could also add in pico, and make it a Mexican salad, just no tortilla chips.

    Getting off the carbs was hard at first (I really love bread), but of the 4 listed, I would guess cheating on this would be the least worse thing you could do, esp if it is just a little and they are healthy carbs (rice cakes or whole grain crackers to replace croutons for example). I'm assuming low doesn't mean none. I'm by no means saying you should disregard your doctor, but you're body is going to be screaming at you until you get into the groove with the new diet...and IMHO it's better to cheat a little with healthy substitutes in this area, than fall off the wagon completely and disregard everything - esp the fat, sugar, calories.

    Yeah don't do this. I know this post is well intentioned, but "healthy" foods for a diabetic are completely different from healthy foods for other people with normal glucose tolerance. For example, rice cakes are one of the worst foods for my glucose levels. Eating carbs with fat and protein slows absorption and prevents blood sugar spikes, so trying to eat "healthy" low fat foods is not a good approach.
  • Dozer8814
    Dozer8814 Posts: 29 Member
    I never seem to understand this phenomenon. You are put on a strict diet, with recipes you don't like, foods you don't normally eat, and enthusiastic about it. You are allowed sugar, but only "natural" sugar. You trust your doctor, yet you go online and ask strangers for motivation and advice. Given good advice, you dismiss it. (This is a general "you"; of course, it can be observed multiple times per day in here; this thread is just so exemplary.)
    I never seem to understand this phenomenon. You are put on a strict diet, with recipes you don't like, foods you don't normally eat, and enthusiastic about it. You are allowed sugar, but only "natural" sugar. You trust your doctor, yet you go online and ask strangers for motivation and advice. Given good advice, you dismiss it. (This is a general "you"; of course, it can be observed multiple times per day in here; this thread is just so exemplary.)
    I never seem to understand this phenomenon. You are put on a strict diet, with recipes you don't like, foods you don't normally eat, and enthusiastic about it. You are allowed sugar, but only "natural" sugar. You trust your doctor, yet you go online and ask strangers for motivation and advice. Given good advice, you dismiss it. (This is a general "you"; of course, it can be observed multiple times per day in here; this thread is just so exemplary.)

    I asked for motivation and recipes. Nowhere in my post does it say "please tell me my dr is wrong and this diets impossible!" Not once. If you don't have motivation or recipes why even comment to attempt to tear another person down? Take your assumptions about me and go elsewhere with them. And I disagree when people like YOU insinuate my dr AND nutritionist are idiots. But I have seem to forgot... we're on mfp. Everyone here are doctors and weightloss professionals. I'm not diabetic. I'm on a diabetic diet. Refined sugar leads to weight gain. Carbs assist in weight gain. Sodium aids in weight gain. I do t have to cut it all out 100%. Low is as low as I can get them! But since you are a professional and know me and my body, why am I wasting my breath?
  • Dozer8814
    Dozer8814 Posts: 29 Member
    I'm not diabetic yet. I'm on a diabetic diet. And low is however low I can get them! He's concerned about carbs because I choose unhealthy carbs. He's worried about sodium because I eat too much. And sodium retains water and leads to weight gain. Calories should be self explanatory... thank you everyone that contributed positive advice and recipes or food ideas here. I appreciate it!!
  • bobtater1
    bobtater1 Posts: 172 Member
    take a look at the Keto threads. They may give you some ideas.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    Dozer8814 wrote: »
    I never seem to understand this phenomenon. You are put on a strict diet, with recipes you don't like, foods you don't normally eat, and enthusiastic about it. You are allowed sugar, but only "natural" sugar. You trust your doctor, yet you go online and ask strangers for motivation and advice. Given good advice, you dismiss it. (This is a general "you"; of course, it can be observed multiple times per day in here; this thread is just so exemplary.)
    I never seem to understand this phenomenon. You are put on a strict diet, with recipes you don't like, foods you don't normally eat, and enthusiastic about it. You are allowed sugar, but only "natural" sugar. You trust your doctor, yet you go online and ask strangers for motivation and advice. Given good advice, you dismiss it. (This is a general "you"; of course, it can be observed multiple times per day in here; this thread is just so exemplary.)
    I never seem to understand this phenomenon. You are put on a strict diet, with recipes you don't like, foods you don't normally eat, and enthusiastic about it. You are allowed sugar, but only "natural" sugar. You trust your doctor, yet you go online and ask strangers for motivation and advice. Given good advice, you dismiss it. (This is a general "you"; of course, it can be observed multiple times per day in here; this thread is just so exemplary.)

    I asked for motivation and recipes. Nowhere in my post does it say "please tell me my dr is wrong and this diets impossible!" Not once. If you don't have motivation or recipes why even comment to attempt to tear another person down? Take your assumptions about me and go elsewhere with them. And I disagree when people like YOU insinuate my dr AND nutritionist are idiots. But I have seem to forgot... we're on mfp. Everyone here are doctors and weightloss professionals. I'm not diabetic. I'm on a diabetic diet. Refined sugar leads to weight gain. Carbs assist in weight gain. Sodium aids in weight gain. I do t have to cut it all out 100%. Low is as low as I can get them! But since you are a professional and know me and my body, why am I wasting my breath?

    Refined sugar does not lead to weight gain, calories lead to weight gain. Carbs and sodium cause more water to be retained in the body, which has nothing to do with gaining or losing fat, and is of no medical interest unless you have high blood pressure.

    Doctors come in all varieties. Many doctors and nutritionists are brilliant and some are idiots. Not knowing your doctor except through you, I can't say which yours is, but these statements you have made on his behalf are incorrect.
  • TeaBea
    TeaBea Posts: 14,517 Member
    Is this advice form a "Diet" Doctor, or are you attempting to address something medical?

    Because many of your comments are false......"drinking water only." This serves no purpose as diet soda does not lead to weight gain. "Good" carbs vs. "bad" carbs, again this is just diet woo.....things you read to sell magazines and internet click bait.

    There are healthier choices and there are less healthy choices. Choose a larger % of the former and a smaller % of the latter. You will become healthier overall.

    Again - weight loss is step #1. Extreme elimination VERY OFTEN leads binging and then relapse. Find a middle ground.......some forever changes.

    No one gets a medal for the most punishing, grueling diet.
  • CharlieBeansmomTracey
    CharlieBeansmomTracey Posts: 7,702 Member
    if refined carbs,sugar and sodium leads or assists weight gain then Im something special because I eat what I want in moderation and lose weight and have off and on for the past 5 years(I have even maintained my weight). I gained weight eating 'healthy" foods too because I ate too much and moved less than normal for me. sodium makes you retain water but the weight gain is water not fat. too many calories caused me to be obese.