Calories from cooking with olive oil?

2

Replies

  • MysticRealm
    MysticRealm Posts: 1,264 Member
    sirrdk wrote: »
    I use 1tbs of olive oil when I make pancakes.
    So for every pancake, I have to use 1, as the oil disappears when I make pancake number 2, and so on.
    (If I don't add some oil/fat for every pancake, then they'll burn)

    For every pancake meal, I'll end up making 5 pancakes, meaning that 5 tbs had been used.

    So, when I'm putting this info in my MFP diary, should I add "5 tbs olive oil?
    Because that's about 600 calories, which is insane!!!
    Some of the oil gets in the food and some don't, I hope.

    So how many percent of that added oil gets wasted and how much gets in my food?
    Please advise :)

    Buy some nice ceramic none stick pans. I don't put any oil/butter/etc in my pan when I'm cooking to save calories and my stuff still comes out great.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Yes. I use a spritzer and if I can't do that I measure out 1 tsp, which is usually enough.
  • A_poetiq
    A_poetiq Posts: 52 Member
    I use the cooking spray. Zero calories. Works the same. Because, yes. I would count them all.
  • Dominicj569
    Dominicj569 Posts: 30 Member
    buy a set of measuring spoons.
    Start at a tablespoon, you'll soon be on half a tablespoon, then a teaspoon, then half a teaspoon, and so on.
  • nailce
    nailce Posts: 1 Member
    Well, better late than never for a reply. Someone earlier said they could not be bothered to measure the amount of oil left after sautéing. As per the recipe, I sautéed 1 1/4 lbs. chicken breast in 2 tbsp. Olive oil. After cooking I did take the time to measure what was remaining: 1 1/2 tbsp! So instead of counting 240 calories for the oil, I am only counting 60.
  • twinkle2356
    twinkle2356 Posts: 28 Member
    olive oil has essential omega three in it, I do believe, so I use in moderation, use instead of vegetable oil etc.
  • twinkle2356
    twinkle2356 Posts: 28 Member
    omega three is easier to digest than the veggie oil. what you want to especially stay away from is the transfats. read up on it. there is also an omega 6 which apparently you want a good ration of 6 and threes..
  • twinkle2356
    twinkle2356 Posts: 28 Member
    too bad we don't have a nutritionist in the family.. I need to ask a coach at gym. they maybe able to help me with the last 10lbs i want to get off.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    A_poetiq wrote: »
    I use the cooking spray. Zero calories. Works the same. Because, yes. I would count them all.

    Cooking spray (usually just olive oil or canola oil) has calories. Not many since you limit how much you use by spraying, but some.

    I don't think they are important to count if you aren't going nuts with it, but oil has calories whether it comes in a spray can or bottle.
  • nayanroy
    nayanroy Posts: 1 Member
    But what if I am using 3 tbsp while baking vegetables for my meal prep. I eat that over four days. Should I count the calories from Olive oil I used for baking the vegetables?
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 33,182 Member
    nayanroy wrote: »
    But what if I am using 3 tbsp while baking vegetables for my meal prep. I eat that over four days. Should I count the calories from Olive oil I used for baking the vegetables?

    Yes, make a recipe for this and then use portions of the recipe.

    Also, this is a four year old thread...
  • Tulip9
    Tulip9 Posts: 143 Member
    I use it almost every day, and carefully measure it. I don’t usually need too much because I have a great nonstick pan. I’m not sure about the cooking spray I have. The can says 0 calories, but when I scan the barcode, it does show calories. How do you all log for the spray?
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    I just log a small number if I happen to use spray (I often use a spritzer which tends to spray a bit more and log half a tsp).
  • tracymegan
    tracymegan Posts: 391 Member
    absolutely, but put the information in the recipe and make it that way and then divide into portions, this will also divide the oil into each serving. And cooking spray HAS calories. No one uses a 1/2 spray of cooking spray.
  • msemiliejean
    msemiliejean Posts: 24 Member
    If you're concerned about the added calories of sautéing with olive oil you can also sauté with water. When I make vegetables for example I add this thinnest layer of water to my pan so nothing sticks. After that you can season to add flavor!
  • Noreenmarie1234
    Noreenmarie1234 Posts: 7,443 Member
    I never cook with oo waste of calories for no bulk in my opinion. I use cooking spray and non stick pans and estimate ~40 calories depending on how much spray I use. Not counting oo would mean you think your eating 100-200 calories less than you are.... which can add up if you use daily to wipe out any deficit.
  • jcapelacio875
    jcapelacio875 Posts: 1 Member
    As Moondrake said it varies with many factors, but you could use a general guideline.

    For lean meats, I would multiply by 0.5 for an error of less than 14g of fat (for 1 tablespoon), but i think it will be more 7g over or under.

    If your goal is generally to lose weight, counting it all doesn't hurt. Now if you're someone whose trying to lean bulk or get shredded on a cut while retaining muscle you wanna get as close to possible and this is when it counts and I wouldn't call 14g small.

    I'd do something like this:

    Meats (skinless chicken, fish, steak, fatty ground meats) x0.5

    High surface areas foods (broccoli, leafy greens, anything shredded, lean ground meats) X.75

    Absorbent (baking pastry, or anything that visually fully absorbs the oil) X1

    don't consume. produce.
    don't assume. deduce.
  • OldHobo
    OldHobo Posts: 647 Member
    edited January 2018
    sirrdk wrote: »
    I use 1tbs of olive oil when I make pancakes.
    So for every pancake, I have to use 1, as the oil disappears when I make pancake number 2, and so on.
    (If I don't add some oil/fat for every pancake, then they'll burn)

    For every pancake meal, I'll end up making 5 pancakes, meaning that 5 tbs had been used.

    So, when I'm putting this info in my MFP diary, should I add "5 tbs olive oil?
    Because that's about 600 calories, which is insane!!!
    Some of the oil gets in the food and some don't, I hope.

    So how many percent of that added oil gets wasted and how much gets in my food?
    Please advise :)

    Since you asked, I hate to tell you this but if you put a tablespoon of oil into the pan, cook one pancake, and then all the oil is gone, 100% of the oil was absorbed into the pancake batter.

    Your batter probably already contains either oil or melted butter so that extra Tbsp. per hotcake is an awful lot. Is the pan hot enough? If not that would contribute to the problem. Also, I prefer either well-seasoned iron or Teflon for pancakes.
    moondrake wrote: »
    It depends on what you are cooking and at what temperature, and how absorbant the food is. If the food is absorbant, like pancakes, then you will be eating all that oil. If the food is moist like most vegetables and adds water when sauteed to the oil rather than absorbing it, and if you eat only the vegetables and throw away that delicious juice then you'll be eating very little of the oil. If you are frying on high heat, then the oil will seal the food so only a little is absorbed. That's the secret to good frying, to preheat the oil till it is hot enough to sear the food on contact and seal it. So there are a lot of variables.
    This is how I've messed up a lot. Maybe I'm not the only one.

    When I heat up some oil in a pan and then add a lot of vegetables with high water content like onions, especially salted onions, they are going to give up water so fast that there is no way it can be boiled off fast enough to continue the frying process. Water accumulates in the oil. Without pressure, it is impossible for liquid water to get hotter than 212ºF at sea level. So the water cools down the oil and the pan. Next, I add meat of some kind because a recipe told me to sauté the chicken pieces with the onions. But sauté means fry in a little oil and that isn't what is going on. I'm really boiling the chicken in oily onion juice and that's rarely never what's supposed to be happening.

    Sometimes the solution is a bigger pan or cooking in batches. Maybe it's a matter of waiting until all the onion juice evaporates before adding the meat; the oil you started with is still mostly in the pan after all, just diluted so when the water evaporates frying will resume. Often the solution just depends on me, the cook, understanding this process so I'm in control; not just blindly following a recipe I didn't understand. Like Moondrake says, "There are a lot variables." More in fact, than can be anticipated by even a good recipe, and not all the recipes on the internet are good.

    I know that most of you reading this already know all this and I certainly mean no insult. I only take the time to write it down because I made this mistake so often for so long before finally realizing what was going on that maybe somebody can learn from my mistakes.
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,373 Member
    Necro thread!