Running in Winter

13

Replies

  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,849 Member
    Also- if you are not freezing your @ss off before you start running, then you are probably over-dressed. You don't want to wear too much.
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,849 Member
    edited October 2017
    For those who have mentioned yak tracks of microspikes, do those affect your stride much? I've never used either, so am curious how they feel as you run.

    Microspikes (unless they also make a more 'nano-' version as well) are way too big/long for city use. They are pretty decent for trail running in the winter though - but they do have to be adjusted occasionally since they shift. I prefer XC spikes (usually ~3/8") for trail running in the winter (as well as summer) - they stay put and usually give me enough traction.
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,849 Member
    bikecheryl wrote: »
    But the other thing to remember is that once you stop running.... hypothermia can set in very quickly. So make sure you have a cell phone with you, change for the bus or are on a route where you can get out of the weather if you happen to injure yourself! :#

    Also.... if your driving to a park or somewhere to run... take dry clothes with you to change into afterward.
    ]

    Yes, this.

    *Make sure your route does have places you can stop into (or at the very least take an extra layer tied around your waist) in case of injury/cramp/fatigue/etc - once you stop running (whether you stay put or continue to walk rather than run), you will get cold FAST.

    *If you have to drive home (or are going to eat/etc) after running, do make sure to have a change of clothes available in your car for immediately after you finish running. (you will get cold fast, and stay that way if you wait too long).
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,849 Member
    Another question: tights, pants ("warm-ups"), or sweatpants ("joggers")?

    I wear tights for cycling, and I've already used them for running this year (with a headlamp, no less). I felt slightly goofy wearing the tights for running. I tried wearing shorts over them, but it looks even goofier. Any advice?

    I may not be able to help you much there...I usually layer an athletic skirt over them.
  • JustRobby1
    JustRobby1 Posts: 674 Member
    Thanks all for the helpful and practical advice. It is much appreciated
  • ashley52601
    ashley52601 Posts: 42 Member
    rebben23 wrote: »
    Chicago here, too!
    My absolutely favorite running item has been a freebie from the Shamrock Shuffle a couple of years ago -- it's the fabric band on the top right. This thing can be an earband, a hat, a neckwarmer, or (my fave) a lightweight face mask. It's a lifesaver!

    17f5zfiq0rgy.jpg

    Chicago does a pretty good job keeping the downtown lakefront path clear of ice so I've not had a problem, but I use my judgement, too. If the waves are out of control, just use the treadmill.

    Would you mind sharing the dimensions of the neckwarmer thingee? It sounds perfect for what I need and would be so simple to make. I imagine it's a pretty lightweight material with good drape and stretch. Would you say that's correct? @rebben23
  • kenyonhaff
    kenyonhaff Posts: 1,377 Member
    There is no one dimension for neck warmers. The simpliest is thin fleece made into a tube. Dimensions adjusted for your neck and preferences.
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    edited October 2017
    rebben23 wrote: »
    Chicago here, too!
    My absolutely favorite running item has been a freebie from the Shamrock Shuffle a couple of years ago -- it's the fabric band on the top right. This thing can be an earband, a hat, a neckwarmer, or (my fave) a lightweight face mask. It's a lifesaver!

    17f5zfiq0rgy.jpg

    Chicago does a pretty good job keeping the downtown lakefront path clear of ice so I've not had a problem, but I use my judgement, too. If the waves are out of control, just use the treadmill.

    Would you mind sharing the dimensions of the neckwarmer thingee? It sounds perfect for what I need and would be so simple to make. I imagine it's a pretty lightweight material with good drape and stretch. Would you say that's correct? @rebben23

    The big advantage of a Buff is that it's seamless. I've got loads of them and use them a lot for running. They're good as sweatbands, hats, neck tubes, wristbands...

    Also, under my helmet for cycling.
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,849 Member
    rebben23 wrote: »
    Chicago here, too!
    My absolutely favorite running item has been a freebie from the Shamrock Shuffle a couple of years ago -- it's the fabric band on the top right. This thing can be an earband, a hat, a neckwarmer, or (my fave) a lightweight face mask. It's a lifesaver!

    17f5zfiq0rgy.jpg

    Chicago does a pretty good job keeping the downtown lakefront path clear of ice so I've not had a problem, but I use my judgement, too. If the waves are out of control, just use the treadmill.

    Would you mind sharing the dimensions of the neckwarmer thingee? It sounds perfect for what I need and would be so simple to make. I imagine it's a pretty lightweight material with good drape and stretch. Would you say that's correct? @rebben23

    I usually wear one of those over my neck and noise too in lieu of a stiffer balaclava + scarf. If memory serves, I think they are $6-10ish on Amazon. And stocked in some local outdoor gear shops. Yes..a lightweight stretchy material. mine is 17"x (2x 9").
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,849 Member
    ritzvin wrote: »
    rebben23 wrote: »
    Chicago here, too!
    My absolutely favorite running item has been a freebie from the Shamrock Shuffle a couple of years ago -- it's the fabric band on the top right. This thing can be an earband, a hat, a neckwarmer, or (my fave) a lightweight face mask. It's a lifesaver!

    17f5zfiq0rgy.jpg

    Chicago does a pretty good job keeping the downtown lakefront path clear of ice so I've not had a problem, but I use my judgement, too. If the waves are out of control, just use the treadmill.

    Would you mind sharing the dimensions of the neckwarmer thingee? It sounds perfect for what I need and would be so simple to make. I imagine it's a pretty lightweight material with good drape and stretch. Would you say that's correct? @rebben23

    I usually wear one of those over my neck and noise too in lieu of a stiffer balaclava + scarf. If memory serves, I think they are $6-10ish on Amazon. And stocked in some local outdoor gear shops. Yes..a lightweight stretchy material. mine is 17"x (2x 9").
    12-in-1 Headwear - Versatile Outdoors & Daily Headwear - Wear as a Bandana, Headband, Neck Gaiter, Balaclava, Helmet Liner, Mask. Moisture Wicking Microfiber for Fishing, Hiking. Lab Tested UPF 30 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00YFHG0EY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_mlO6zb4RDJEXK
  • ashley52601
    ashley52601 Posts: 42 Member
    ritzvin wrote: »
    rebben23 wrote: »
    Chicago here, too!
    My absolutely favorite running item has been a freebie from the Shamrock Shuffle a couple of years ago -- it's the fabric band on the top right. This thing can be an earband, a hat, a neckwarmer, or (my fave) a lightweight face mask. It's a lifesaver!

    17f5zfiq0rgy.jpg

    Chicago does a pretty good job keeping the downtown lakefront path clear of ice so I've not had a problem, but I use my judgement, too. If the waves are out of control, just use the treadmill.

    Would you mind sharing the dimensions of the neckwarmer thingee? It sounds perfect for what I need and would be so simple to make. I imagine it's a pretty lightweight material with good drape and stretch. Would you say that's correct? @rebben23

    I usually wear one of those over my neck and noise too in lieu of a stiffer balaclava + scarf. If memory serves, I think they are $6-10ish on Amazon. And stocked in some local outdoor gear shops. Yes..a lightweight stretchy material. mine is 17"x (2x 9").

    Thanks!
  • ashley52601
    ashley52601 Posts: 42 Member
    kenyonhaff wrote: »
    There is no one dimension for neck warmers. The simpliest is thin fleece made into a tube. Dimensions adjusted for your neck and preferences.

    Thanks, I realize length would be dependant on neck or head size, was more interested in the depth since it can be folded, etc.
  • GiddyupTim
    GiddyupTim Posts: 2,819 Member
    I've run in winter in Chicago for many years. I no longer live there, but I still visit often.
    I've never had any serious problem. Sure, you need to wear gloves, a hat, a wind breaker, sometimes a sweat shirt, and running tights. But once you are moving you will be fine. I've never worn any special socks or snow-type shoes and haven't ever wished I had.
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,452 Member
    I wear running wind pants - a double nylon - because they have good pockets. My tights don't. If it was really really cold, I might wear long underwear underneath, but so far, running as low as 15 degrees, it wasn't necessary. I really like my fleece earband for days when it's not cold enough for a wool hat. I also have gloves of various thickness. A very light pair is my usual, but on colder days I like fleece. Usually I end up taking them off after a few miles, but if the windchill is bad, they stay on.
  • scorpio516
    scorpio516 Posts: 955 Member
    New England winter - warmer than midwest winter, but snowier and windier.

    Below freezing:
    Tights. Mid weight Ascics for me
    Long sleeve tech shirt
    Hat. In high school in Michigan, it was just a knit hat. Now it's a knit with fleece liner, or fleece hat for athletics - got a decent Nike one.
    Gloves. Again, used to be the knit stretch gloves. Now tech gloves. Got some from Target, and some that came with that Nike hat.
    Jacket. I use a very light Brooks spring/fall jacket. It's wind and water resistant. Definitely not proof!

    Socks are the same as I wear in the summer
  • sofchak
    sofchak Posts: 862 Member
    Lots of great advice here. Only thing new I can add is that until you realize how layering will/won’t work for you, I recommend finding a place where you can safely drop off clothing during your run.

    Last year was my first time experiencing winter running and I found that I overdressed a bit often and underdressed occasionally. Until I figured out my happy medium, I would run at a local park that was a .6 mile loop to my car. That way, I could drop off clothes as I started to overheat or grab a jacket if it suddenly felt colder than I expected.

    Good luck! It is indeed peaceful running so enjoy the journey!
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,191 Member
    I live in the frozen city that is known as 'Winterpeg'. Winnipeg, right in the center of Canada. Our winters are brutal, can expect temperatures of less than -20 C (-4F) for well over three months. Not rare to reach -30C for stretches of a week at a time.
    Pretty tough to run in that, especially when windy and cold. But on mild days, I love running outside. Dress in breathable wear cause I sweat way more than normal, and be careful with ice. Cover your face cause you may not feel cold, but can get frostbite with exposed skin

    Lived there as a kid (On Corydon close to Assiniboine Park) I still remember those winters. One of my friends from Albert still complain about how much colder it feels here in Ottawa as (in his words) it's a damp cold.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,967 Member
    rebben23 wrote: »
    Chicago here, too!
    My absolutely favorite running item has been a freebie from the Shamrock Shuffle a couple of years ago -- it's the fabric band on the top right. This thing can be an earband, a hat, a neckwarmer, or (my fave) a lightweight face mask. It's a lifesaver!

    17f5zfiq0rgy.jpg

    Chicago does a pretty good job keeping the downtown lakefront path clear of ice so I've not had a problem, but I use my judgement, too. If the waves are out of control, just use the treadmill.

    Would you mind sharing the dimensions of the neckwarmer thingee? It sounds perfect for what I need and would be so simple to make. I imagine it's a pretty lightweight material with good drape and stretch. Would you say that's correct? @rebben23

    The big advantage of a Buff is that it's seamless. I've got loads of them and use them a lot for running. They're good as sweatbands, hats, neck tubes, wristbands...

    Also, under my helmet for cycling.

    Yep. And they're small and light and versatile. In the winter I'll bring one in my pocket in case conditions are worse than I thought. If it's windy I can fold it a few times and use it as a headband to cover my ears, or as a scarf/neck gaiter to keep cold drafts out.
  • ICameToGetDown
    ICameToGetDown Posts: 958 Member
    fqojkada57dy.jpg
  • ICameToGetDown
    ICameToGetDown Posts: 958 Member
    The above pic was helpful for me.

    It takes some trial and error. Best items are a buff or other light item I could pull up for the beginning part of the run when I am cold and not used to breathing in the air. It's also helpful to pull up to my cheeks when the wind is in my face.

    Wool socks!

    As others stated, visibility is super important any time of year. In the winter, I sometimes have to switch to running at night vs early am due to the thin sheen / ice in the road. Falling is no fun.

    If you have the opportunity, get out for a run during a snowfall. Most beautiful and peaceful time.