I want to gain muscle and loose body fat

kazane1
kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
Hi all I really want to loose body fat to get the shredded look and at the same time I want to gain muscle mass I'm currently 126lb and I'm 5ft5inxhes in height. I go to the gym 5days a week for about 1hour-1hour and a half a day, and I'm eating about 2,645 calories a day with the protein ranging between 130-180g a day. And I go for an hour walk in the mornings and an hour walk in the evenings.But I'm just not feeling the gains or feeling like I'm bulking that much at all and I don't know what I'm doing wrong. Any advice would be highly appreciated and if you have any questions for me please ask. I see it's a very tight community here on MFP so I'm finally reaching out for some help on here. Thank you all.
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Replies

  • kazane1
    kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
    Thanks for the help, I currently follow a plan that's: legs on Monday chest on Tuesday back on Wednesday then rest on Thursday then shoulders Friday then arms on Saturday and rest on Sunday and I do all difffrrent types of lifts and things like that. And I'm not fat I just want to try to aim for a ripped six pack really as I'm also not ripped. So really I should be eating more and gaining weight and then lifting heavy to put on muscle once I have more weight in me?
    I'll look into those lifting programmes later today as well thank you. And I got two big dogs that need walking in the morning and the evening so I gotta take them out for an hour or so everyday for there benifit.
    Thanks for the response people.
  • bweath2
    bweath2 Posts: 147 Member
    Intensity in your lifts is key. Give your muscles a reason to get bigger and stronger. High weight, low reps (less than 12 per set) and work your sets to failure. Also you can do a burnout set on the the last set of each muscle group.
    Focus on building muscle. Even if you don't lose body fat, your BF% will decrease as you gain muscle. Higher weight + same body fat mass = lower BF%.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,142 MFP Moderator
    bweath2 wrote: »
    Intensity in your lifts is key. Give your muscles a reason to get bigger and stronger. High weight, low reps (less than 12 per set) and work your sets to failure. Also you can do a burnout set on the the last set of each muscle group.
    Focus on building muscle. Even if you don't lose body fat, your BF% will decrease as you gain muscle. Higher weight + same body fat mass = lower BF%.

    Burn out sets have their place, but that place is not on every set. A person should work a variety of rep ranges to ensure you are activity type I and II muscle fibers. This way you get the benefits of both and based on total volume, you will still get a hypertrophy effect.
  • erickirb
    erickirb Posts: 12,278 Member
    ecjim wrote: »
    The fact that you are in the gym 1- 1.5 hour each day means nothing - what do you do there ? your program needs to be based on compound lifts - squat ,bench & OH press, row, dead lifts. do a full body program 3X a week - Strong lifts - Starting Strength -coach Dan John Gaining Mass -pick one and stick with it. Don't worry about being shredded now -at 126 Lbs you have no muscle - you need to lift & eat. your protein intake is probably OK for now - more would be OK - also potatoes & rice - milk eggs. peanut butter sandwiches. don't forget your veggies. Eastcoast Jim

    Less protein would be fine too. 0.8 grams per lb of lean mass is more than enough, which would probably be in the 90-gram range for the OP, especially in a caloric surplus. protein is more important to retain muscle in a deficit than it is to build muscle in a surplus.

    My suggestion would be to do less cardio, if a lot of your gym time is spent doing cardio, and to find a good lifting porgram that has progression built in.

    OP, what program do you follow know?
    What is your cardio/Lifting split? (in time or days)
  • brendanwhite84
    brendanwhite84 Posts: 220 Member
    I used Stronglifts, eventually progressing to Wendler 5/3/1 for strength training. I was coming from an endurance sports background so I was already lean (BMI 18.75, 7.5% body fat). I've eaten high protein and sufficient calories to gain half a pound per week, which has minimized my fat gain and maximized muscle gain since I don't feel the need to rush.

    I'm almost at my goal BMI of 22.2 with single-digit body fat (haven't done composition testing lately to bullseye the number). Once that's done I'm either going to eat at maintenance and continue to lift heavy to continue slow recomposition, or I might choose to gain up to 23 or 23.5 BMI depending on how I look and feel at 22.2.

    Once you get your weightlifting routine and protein needs dialed in it's not so hard. Don't worry so very much about doing excess cardio - that's a bit of broscience. I couldn't gain weight while doing it but I maintained successfully during the final months of training for an Ironman triathlon by eating monstrous amounts of food and high protein ratio. Heavy lifting was definitely on hold for a while though.
  • erickirb
    erickirb Posts: 12,278 Member
    bweath2 wrote: »
    Intensity in your lifts is key. Give your muscles a reason to get bigger and stronger. High weight, low reps (less than 12 per set) and work your sets to failure. Also you can do a burnout set on the the last set of each muscle group.
    Focus on building muscle. Even if you don't lose body fat, your BF% will decrease as you gain muscle. Higher weight + same body fat mass = lower BF%.

    Not sure I agree with most of this... I like to go less than 8 reps for strength, but for building size, working the 8-15 rep range is ideal, not necessarily under 12, but if you want to increase strength too I would agree. But the OP does not need to go to failure, especially on every set!
  • bweath2
    bweath2 Posts: 147 Member
    @erickirb Mike Mentzer was a big proponent of high intensity, low volume (compared to other bodybuilders). He suggested a range of 6-9 reps per set for maximum gains and used many techniques to work each set to positive failure and beyond (burn out sets, forced positives, rest-pause, negative sets, etc.)
    I'm not saying this method is "the best", but it is a great method for people like me who's time in the gym is limited. I have found the greatest success working every set to failure. Most guys I know looking for size gains stay at 8-12 reps/set and most focusing on strength stay at 5 or less reps/set. These ranges are also consistent with almost everything legitimate I have read.
  • bweath2
    bweath2 Posts: 147 Member
    edited October 2017
    psuLemon wrote: »
    bweath2 wrote: »
    Intensity in your lifts is key. Give your muscles a reason to get bigger and stronger. High weight, low reps (less than 12 per set) and work your sets to failure. Also you can do a burnout set on the the last set of each muscle group.
    Focus on building muscle. Even if you don't lose body fat, your BF% will decrease as you gain muscle. Higher weight + same body fat mass = lower BF%.

    Burn out sets have their place, but that place is not on every set. A person should work a variety of rep ranges to ensure you are activity type I and II muscle fibers. This way you get the benefits of both and based on total volume, you will still get a hypertrophy effect.

    I wasn't proposing a burn out set on every set. The method I was suggesting was to work every set to positive failure, then do a burn out set on the last set of each muscle group. This is similar to one of Mike Mentzer's methods.
    Personally, I follow a program in a 8-12 rep range for 10 weeks, then switch to a 5-7 rep range for 10 weeks. Repeat. Works size and strength alternately. I have seen the greatest gains since I started using this method.
    I would not include rep ranges over 12 unless I was trying to gain endurance.
  • brendanwhite84
    brendanwhite84 Posts: 220 Member
    GymTennis wrote: »

    2. Follow a sound lifting program. Don't wander around the gym not really knowing what you doing. Understand the principle of progressive overload.

    +1 for this. Wandering around the gym with no focused agenda is a recipe for wasted time.

  • wackyfunster
    wackyfunster Posts: 944 Member
    GymTennis wrote: »

    2. Follow a sound lifting program. Don't wander around the gym not really knowing what you doing. Understand the principle of progressive overload.

    +1 for this. Wandering around the gym with no focused agenda is a recipe for wasted time.

    Especially for beginners. Run a program developed by a reputable coach, and run it AS WRITTEN (i.e. no tweaks/customization) for at least 12 consecutive weeks before switching routines.
  • kazane1
    kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
    kazane1 wrote: »
    Thanks for the help, I currently follow a plan that's: legs on Monday chest on Tuesday back on Wednesday then rest on Thursday then shoulders Friday then arms on Saturday and rest on Sunday and I do all difffrrent types of lifts and things like that. And I'm not fat I just want to try to aim for a ripped six pack really as I'm also not ripped. So really I should be eating more and gaining weight and then lifting heavy to put on muscle once I have more weight in me?
    I'll look into those lifting programmes later today as well thank you. And I got two big dogs that need walking in the morning and the evening so I gotta take them out for an hour or so everyday for there benifit.
    Thanks for the response people.

    No... You should be lifting heavy (following a progressive lifting program) whilst eating at a surplus to gain muscle weight. Once you've gained some weight, which will be both fat and muscle, you do a cut to lose fat and reveal the muscles...

    Ahh okay then I'm going to look into a bulking programme and switch things up a bit then, thanks for the advice.
  • kazane1
    kazane1 Posts: 264 Member
    erickirb wrote: »
    ecjim wrote: »
    The fact that you are in the gym 1- 1.5 hour each day means nothing - what do you do there ? your program needs to be based on compound lifts - squat ,bench & OH press, row, dead lifts. do a full body program 3X a week - Strong lifts - Starting Strength -coach Dan John Gaining Mass -pick one and stick with it. Don't worry about being shredded now -at 126 Lbs you have no muscle - you need to lift & eat. your protein intake is probably OK for now - more would be OK - also potatoes & rice - milk eggs. peanut butter sandwiches. don't forget your veggies. Eastcoast Jim

    Less protein would be fine too. 0.8 grams per lb of lean mass is more than enough, which would probably be in the 90-gram range for the OP, especially in a caloric surplus. protein is more important to retain muscle in a deficit than it is to build muscle in a surplus.

    My suggestion would be to do less cardio, if a lot of your gym time is spent doing cardio, and to find a good lifting porgram that has progression built in.

    OP, what program do you follow know?
    What is your cardio/Lifting split? (in time or days)

    I currently am doing legs/abs Monday, chest Tuesday, back/abs Wednesday, Thursday rest, Friday shoulders/abs and then Saturday arms and Sunday rest. and I do an hour walk every morning and evening along with a stretching session to loosen up the body every morning the takes 20minutes. But people here have been saying I should switch that and do a progressive lifting programme instead so I think I'm going to look into that "dan john- gaining mass" and try to follow his routine.