What about dry needling?

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Replies

  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
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    301f53851afbee44eb306ab2e9ebfa4b--sore-muscles-trigger-points.jpg
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    "Unique multi-purpose handles," indeed.

  • astronaught
    astronaught Posts: 103 Member
    TR0berts wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    ...

    301f53851afbee44eb306ab2e9ebfa4b--sore-muscles-trigger-points.jpg
    ...

    "Unique multi-purpose handles," indeed.

    I had to very quickly go and check that the item like this I put on my secret santa wish list for work doesn't have those unique multi-purpose handles. Luckily it doesn't. That could be embarrassing.
  • Silkysausage
    Silkysausage Posts: 550 Member
    edited December 2017
    I'm a Trigger Point Therapy specialist and have performed many successful treatments with both this and dry needling. The quadratus lumborum, glutes, hamstrings and quads all come into play with lower back pain.

    I suggest reactivating switched off glutes with squats, yoga stretches such as one legged pigeon for glutes and hamstrings and quad stretches as these are antagonists for the hammies.

    Dry needling is done in and around trigger points that have been shown to exist, it is not based on Traditional Chinese Medicine.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,701 Member
    Grnhouse wrote: »
    Thanks @RuNaRoUnDaFiEld. Looked into it. Not ready yet for this type of yoga but will try beginner yoga, the basics.

    Most forms of yoga in the West can be classified as Hatha Yoga. Hatha simply refers to the practice of physical yoga postures, meaning your Ashtanga, vinyasa, Iyengar and Power Yoga classes are all Hatha Yoga.

    'Beginner' and 'gentle' yoga are hatha yoga as well :)

    I always recommend Rodney Yee's A.M. and P.M. Yoga For Beginners for those new to yoga, or who want a gentle stretch, or for a warm up for something else.

    You can probably find this on youtube as well. It's the one where he starts by saying "The morning is a precious time. Just as the sun rises and falls, so do our natural rhythms. The morning is perfect time to open our bodies and center our minds."
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,701 Member
    In addition to yoga and generally staying active, what has helped my lower back tremendously is a decent chair, specifically, a Herman Miller, which I was lucky enough to inherit from my boss after the second time he fell out if it.
  • Niki_Fitz
    Niki_Fitz Posts: 943 Member
    edited December 2017
    I'm a Trigger Point Therapy specialist and have performed many successful treatments with both this and dry needling. The quadratus lumborum, glutes, hamstrings and quads all come into play with lower back pain.

    I suggest reactivating switched off glutes with squats, yoga stretches such as one legged pigeon for glutes and hamstrings and quad stretches as these are antagonists for the hammies.

    Dry needling is done in and around trigger points that have been shown to exist, it is not based on Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    ^ Agree about the glutes.

    I do manual trigger point therapy. Many of my clients get dry needling done by others and report real results.
  • zelawoza
    zelawoza Posts: 1 Member
    PT go through a weekend of training for needling. Accupincturists typically have extensive training. Go with a professionally trained acupuncturist and skip doing it at your PT.
  • Niki_Fitz
    Niki_Fitz Posts: 943 Member
    zelawoza wrote: »
    PT go through a weekend of training for needling. Accupincturists typically have extensive training. Go with a professionally trained acupuncturist and skip doing it at your PT.

    I know acupuncturists who do dry needling as an adjunct therapy. There’s some difference between traditional acupuncture and dry needling.