Anti inflammatory diet???

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Replies

  • SCoil123
    SCoil123 Posts: 2,108 Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Why do answers to this kind of question mostly talk about what to leave out? ;) To me, it makes more sense to talk about what to include in one's eating. ;)

    Besides good protein sources (some of which can be plants), and healthy fats (nuts, avocados, seeds, olive oil, etc.), eat plenty of nutritious, varied, colorful veggies and fruits. They're full of nice antioxidants and fiber. Five servings daily is good, more can be even better.

    In actual practice, the idea of an anti-inflammatory diet tends to get a little woo-y pretty fast: Lots of eye-roll-y nonsense on the web from the usual alt-health quacks, hard to sort from useful info. Mainly, focus on getting an overall nutritious, well-rounded diet at an appropriate calorie level, and keep foods that are calorie-dense but not nutrition-dense (cookies, cake, sugary drinks, alcohol) as "sometimes" foods, a small part of your eating, to be savored when calories are available and after all the major nutrition boxes are checked, or on the rare special occasion. Advice from mainstream national and international nutrition bodies (USDA, WHO, etc.) is mostly not stupid.

    One of the biggest things to do to combat system inflammation is simply to be at a healthy body weight. If you're overweight or obese, pick a calorie goal that will get you losing 1% of your body weight per week or less, and stick with it. Get some exercise, if you aren't already - that reduces system inflammation over time, too. Think about stress reduction, for bonus points.

    And consider getting a new doctor - one who sends you off to go on a potentially misunderstandable diet, with no guidance, isn't doing you many favors, IMO.
    mbaker566 wrote: »
    i found it to be pointless. google has many different versions if you want to give it a try
    usually includes no dairy, gluten, or red meat. alcohol depends on the version.

    SOME Celiac have been successfully treated(cured?) by daily mega doses of bran.
    Not true, Celiac is an autoimmune disease. No amount of bran (?) or anything else will cure it. The only treatment is the gluten free diet.

    I was going to comment on that too. There is no food out there that stops an (auto)immune response from happening. Would be nice, but autoimmune diseases don't work that way.

    ETA that some foods are less inflammatory than others in some situations. High sugar and insulin are thought to be more inflammatory than low sugar(glucose) and insulin.

    While no diet cures an autoimmune disease there are ways of eating that reduce symptoms of many autoimmune conditions. I’ve never heard the bran thing before though
  • L1zardQueen
    L1zardQueen Posts: 8,756 Member
    SCoil123 wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Why do answers to this kind of question mostly talk about what to leave out? ;) To me, it makes more sense to talk about what to include in one's eating. ;)

    Besides good protein sources (some of which can be plants), and healthy fats (nuts, avocados, seeds, olive oil, etc.), eat plenty of nutritious, varied, colorful veggies and fruits. They're full of nice antioxidants and fiber. Five servings daily is good, more can be even better.

    In actual practice, the idea of an anti-inflammatory diet tends to get a little woo-y pretty fast: Lots of eye-roll-y nonsense on the web from the usual alt-health quacks, hard to sort from useful info. Mainly, focus on getting an overall nutritious, well-rounded diet at an appropriate calorie level, and keep foods that are calorie-dense but not nutrition-dense (cookies, cake, sugary drinks, alcohol) as "sometimes" foods, a small part of your eating, to be savored when calories are available and after all the major nutrition boxes are checked, or on the rare special occasion. Advice from mainstream national and international nutrition bodies (USDA, WHO, etc.) is mostly not stupid.

    One of the biggest things to do to combat system inflammation is simply to be at a healthy body weight. If you're overweight or obese, pick a calorie goal that will get you losing 1% of your body weight per week or less, and stick with it. Get some exercise, if you aren't already - that reduces system inflammation over time, too. Think about stress reduction, for bonus points.

    And consider getting a new doctor - one who sends you off to go on a potentially misunderstandable diet, with no guidance, isn't doing you many favors, IMO.
    mbaker566 wrote: »
    i found it to be pointless. google has many different versions if you want to give it a try
    usually includes no dairy, gluten, or red meat. alcohol depends on the version.

    SOME Celiac have been successfully treated(cured?) by daily mega doses of bran.
    Not true, Celiac is an autoimmune disease. No amount of bran (?) or anything else will cure it. The only treatment is the gluten free diet.

    I was going to comment on that too. There is no food out there that stops an (auto)immune response from happening. Would be nice, but autoimmune diseases don't work that way.

    ETA that some foods are less inflammatory than others in some situations. High sugar and insulin are thought to be more inflammatory than low sugar(glucose) and insulin.

    While no diet cures an autoimmune disease there are ways of eating that reduce symptoms of many autoimmune conditions. I’ve never heard the bran thing before though

    I’ve tried all sorts of diets, (low carb, keto, whole30), but the thing that works for me is the doctor that knows his stuff. I wish the food I eat or don’t eat was the answer, but alas.
  • L1zardQueen
    L1zardQueen Posts: 8,756 Member
    SCoil123 wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Why do answers to this kind of question mostly talk about what to leave out? ;) To me, it makes more sense to talk about what to include in one's eating. ;)

    Besides good protein sources (some of which can be plants), and healthy fats (nuts, avocados, seeds, olive oil, etc.), eat plenty of nutritious, varied, colorful veggies and fruits. They're full of nice antioxidants and fiber. Five servings daily is good, more can be even better.

    In actual practice, the idea of an anti-inflammatory diet tends to get a little woo-y pretty fast: Lots of eye-roll-y nonsense on the web from the usual alt-health quacks, hard to sort from useful info. Mainly, focus on getting an overall nutritious, well-rounded diet at an appropriate calorie level, and keep foods that are calorie-dense but not nutrition-dense (cookies, cake, sugary drinks, alcohol) as "sometimes" foods, a small part of your eating, to be savored when calories are available and after all the major nutrition boxes are checked, or on the rare special occasion. Advice from mainstream national and international nutrition bodies (USDA, WHO, etc.) is mostly not stupid.

    One of the biggest things to do to combat system inflammation is simply to be at a healthy body weight. If you're overweight or obese, pick a calorie goal that will get you losing 1% of your body weight per week or less, and stick with it. Get some exercise, if you aren't already - that reduces system inflammation over time, too. Think about stress reduction, for bonus points.

    And consider getting a new doctor - one who sends you off to go on a potentially misunderstandable diet, with no guidance, isn't doing you many favors, IMO.
    mbaker566 wrote: »
    i found it to be pointless. google has many different versions if you want to give it a try
    usually includes no dairy, gluten, or red meat. alcohol depends on the version.

    SOME Celiac have been successfully treated(cured?) by daily mega doses of bran.
    Not true, Celiac is an autoimmune disease. No amount of bran (?) or anything else will cure it. The only treatment is the gluten free diet.

    I was going to comment on that too. There is no food out there that stops an (auto)immune response from happening. Would be nice, but autoimmune diseases don't work that way.

    ETA that some foods are less inflammatory than others in some situations. High sugar and insulin are thought to be more inflammatory than low sugar(glucose) and insulin.

    While no diet cures an autoimmune disease there are ways of eating that reduce symptoms of many autoimmune conditions. I’ve never heard the bran thing before though

    I’ve tried all sorts of diets, (low carb, keto, whole30), but the thing that works for me is the doctor that knows his stuff. I wish the food I eat or don’t eat was the answer, but alas.

    Me too. I hate people saying I would be cured if I ate a certain way. It implies that you are not trying hard enough. No diet has cured my Crohn's and gastroparesis. I have tried everything (except pseudoscience stuff) with no relief from my symptoms. I still has many symptoms on TPN and iv nutrition which goes directly to your heart and bypasses the GI tract completely.

    It sucks. Only if.........
  • Fflpnari
    Fflpnari Posts: 973 Member
    Most docotors are not the best for giving this info. Can you ask for a referral for an RD?
    I don't follow an anti immflammotory diet, but have had results with lower carb and more protein. Within the same caloried allotment if I have more carbs i fell like im bloated, yes including my joints (knee and back mainly). I would play around with your diet and see what works for you.
  • Candyspun
    Candyspun Posts: 371 Member
    OP, I came back to say a few more things that came to mind. Amazon and book depository have lots of books/cookbooks on the subject.

    It will take a lot of trial and error to find what works for you, personally. I have found personally, that exercise is my most powerful anti inflammatory. That reduces all of my endo pain and joint pain by 80%. I choose exercises that challenge me, but don’t cause more harm.

    Turmeric has been very helpful for me, but I avoid it when I’m menstruating, because it can thin the blood. Home fermented foods, such as sauerkraut and kim chi have had an extremely positive effect on my entire body. It has especially helped my endo pain, because it clears out my bowels (sorry for tmi). This is important for me, because with all the growths in that area, the more space being used by my bowels, the more pain I have in the pelvis.

    Also, I love to include bone broth. I wasn’t sure how much of it would be pseudoscience, but was desperate enough to try, and I love broth anyway. It has been nothing short of amazing for my joints. It’s been incredible for me.

    Overall, try some anti inflammatory foods, and take time to observe how your body responds. Ditto for eliminating things.

  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    edited June 2018
    What kind of inflammation is your doctor wanting you to avoid? Any anti-inflammatory diet is usually condition-specific. Did they mean low FODMAP? Did they mean celiac-friendly? Do you have a food range intolerance like nightshades? Do you have GERD? Are you allergic to something? What type of inflammation are you experiencing?
  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,027 Member
    edited June 2018
    Candyspun wrote: »
    Oh, and to the person who hit the ‘woo’ button: prior to eating this way, I was on bed rest most days. I was in excruciating pain standing up, sitting down, and I walked around like a little old lady. Everything hurt, all the time. I couldn’t move my bowels properly.

    I’m not saying it has cured me. I will always have endo. But I’m not living a miserable existence anymore. I can move around with a lot less pain. I can now exercise more vigorously. And because I can exercise, I’m finally losing weight. I also went from catching every cold and flu to hardly catching anything at all. Explain to me, how me stating what has personally worked for MY body, is ‘woo’?

    You’ve really crapped on my efforts, here. I can walk without pain, now. How dare you dismiss that?

    There have been many threads where people say they thought woo was a good thing. I wouldn't expend too much indignation over a random internet stranger clicking the woo button, especially when it's so easy to accidentally click a button while scrolling through a thread on your phone and when so many people are confused by what woo is.

    Having said that, another possibility is your use of the term "bone broth" which is often purported to heal all ills on woo-woo blogs, it's a triggering term for some folks :drinker:
  • Candyspun
    Candyspun Posts: 371 Member
    Thanks, Kimny
  • Candyspun
    Candyspun Posts: 371 Member
    Great effort, Gale
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,020 Member
    SCoil123 wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Why do answers to this kind of question mostly talk about what to leave out? ;) To me, it makes more sense to talk about what to include in one's eating. ;)

    Besides good protein sources (some of which can be plants), and healthy fats (nuts, avocados, seeds, olive oil, etc.), eat plenty of nutritious, varied, colorful veggies and fruits. They're full of nice antioxidants and fiber. Five servings daily is good, more can be even better.

    In actual practice, the idea of an anti-inflammatory diet tends to get a little woo-y pretty fast: Lots of eye-roll-y nonsense on the web from the usual alt-health quacks, hard to sort from useful info. Mainly, focus on getting an overall nutritious, well-rounded diet at an appropriate calorie level, and keep foods that are calorie-dense but not nutrition-dense (cookies, cake, sugary drinks, alcohol) as "sometimes" foods, a small part of your eating, to be savored when calories are available and after all the major nutrition boxes are checked, or on the rare special occasion. Advice from mainstream national and international nutrition bodies (USDA, WHO, etc.) is mostly not stupid.

    One of the biggest things to do to combat system inflammation is simply to be at a healthy body weight. If you're overweight or obese, pick a calorie goal that will get you losing 1% of your body weight per week or less, and stick with it. Get some exercise, if you aren't already - that reduces system inflammation over time, too. Think about stress reduction, for bonus points.

    And consider getting a new doctor - one who sends you off to go on a potentially misunderstandable diet, with no guidance, isn't doing you many favors, IMO.
    mbaker566 wrote: »
    i found it to be pointless. google has many different versions if you want to give it a try
    usually includes no dairy, gluten, or red meat. alcohol depends on the version.

    SOME Celiac have been successfully treated(cured?) by daily mega doses of bran.
    Not true, Celiac is an autoimmune disease. No amount of bran (?) or anything else will cure it. The only treatment is the gluten free diet.

    I was going to comment on that too. There is no food out there that stops an (auto)immune response from happening. Would be nice, but autoimmune diseases don't work that way.

    ETA that some foods are less inflammatory than others in some situations. High sugar and insulin are thought to be more inflammatory than low sugar(glucose) and insulin.

    While no diet cures an autoimmune disease there are ways of eating that reduce symptoms of many autoimmune conditions. I’ve never heard the bran thing before though

    I agreed completely. To discount foods is to ignore a potentially influential factor in disease management... There is just no cure.

    I am a celiac. If I avoid gluten I'll eventually, after months or years, test negative for the disease, but as soon as I eat gluten again it is a positive result.

    I have a couple of other autoimmune issues where the attack causes permanent damage. Even if the immune response stops, the damage is done.