Deadlift advice

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  • digidoomed
    digidoomed Posts: 151 Member
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    I don't think there's anything wrong with what you are doing. I wouldn't use plastic steps tho, maybe some wood blocks with a v notch would be better. Also, since for your last lift you go up to 135 anyway, why don't you just take off the tens and put 45s on?

    I haven't gone to 135 yet. I think i just worded that part wrong. When I put the 25lb plates on, I take the two 10lbs off. I substitute the 25 on my last set just to try and build up my strength on the way to 135
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
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    I think the steps are fine at this weight. Even at 135 they should be fine, assuming the OP's isn't standing tall and letting them drop.
  • mutantspicy
    mutantspicy Posts: 624 Member
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    digidoomed wrote: »
    I don't think there's anything wrong with what you are doing. I wouldn't use plastic steps tho, maybe some wood blocks with a v notch would be better. Also, since for your last lift you go up to 135 anyway, why don't you just take off the tens and put 45s on?

    I haven't gone to 135 yet. I think i just worded that part wrong. When I put the 25lb plates on, I take the two 10lbs off. I substitute the 25 on my last set just to try and build up my strength on the way to 135

    Ahh! I get ya!
  • quiksylver296
    quiksylver296 Posts: 28,439 Member
    edited July 2018
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    jemhh wrote: »
    I think the steps are fine at this weight. Even at 135 they should be fine, assuming the OP's isn't standing tall and letting them drop.

    Right?!? They support 200+ lb people doing step aerobics.

    I've used them for 365 lb block pulls.
  • darreneatschicken
    darreneatschicken Posts: 669 Member
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    Instead of using those step platforms, stack plates on top of one another.
  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,464 Member
    edited July 2018
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    jemhh wrote: »
    I think the steps are fine at this weight. Even at 135 they should be fine, assuming the OP's isn't standing tall and letting them drop.

    Well, sometimes a DL can come down a little hard. And having that weight land in one small spot under the plate (probably about 2 square inches) vs being distributed over a larger area the size of a shoe (20-30 sq inches) can make a big difference in how it hold us over the long haul. If you're using gym equipment, which it appears OP is, it is considerate to use it as intended. Step platforms are not intended for weight platforms. If it's your own equipment, then it's ok to take the risk.

    I've not broken a step platform, but in "my life" in general, I've seen a lot of things crack and break because they were subjected to a bit more stress than intended. Just sayin.
  • TrishSeren
    TrishSeren Posts: 587 Member
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    I started like this because my old gym didn't have bounce plates so I had tiny wee plates. I used to lift up from the rack (the squat rack and low bar for deadlifts) and then walk the bar out of the rack, do my set and then walk it back to the rack.

    I saw progress very quickly!
  • Walter__
    Walter__ Posts: 518 Member
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    Get a pair of 5lb bumper plates.

    They're the size of full size plates, but they're only 5 lbs.

    Best thing a beginner can do.
  • ExistingFish
    ExistingFish Posts: 1,259 Member
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    My workout plan has me starting with deadlifts off blocks, supposed to be easier for progressive training. Then progress to off the floor. Also because if you start with less than 135 it won't be full height without bumper plates. The authors of the book I follow seem to think it should be on blocks if you aren't to 135 yet, so I'm okay with that. Technically, I haven't done it yet it's literally in my next workout.

    I've seen people at my gym use the power rack and set the safety's really low and use that. We have bumper plates though so I plan to use those instead.