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Air Plane seats

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  • DKG28
    DKG28 Posts: 299 Member
    I experienced my first episode of being seated next to an individual that really didn't fit in the seat. He was more than squished. He might have actually been mostly resting on the arm rests of the window seat of a 2 seat row. I'm just into the overweight spectrum - so pretty average, and after he took his place, I could not properly sit in my seat. I'm not talking about touching thighs or shoulders or armrest encroachment. I had to turn sideways and sit on the side of one butt cheek, twisted so my upper body and both arms were facing the aisle. That's just not acceptable. I was unable to use the seatbelt in that position. All of the thoughts ran through my head of how to be kind and how to ask the flight attendant if there was an open seat elsewhere without embarrassing him (the plane was full, from what I could see). I don't know what the solution is, but at some point, it's not just a matter of comfort, but one of safety. Perhaps, if a person needs two seats, airlines could use a system where they check-in in person and the agent can secure them a seat next to an unoccupied one if the plane is not full, or perhaps the gate agent could be made aware of the need, and have the ability to make that arrangement...something more discreet than flagging down the flight attendant. Most flights are not full - airlines could accomodate larger individuals often without losing money or having to sell 2 seats, or an expensive upgrade for someone who can't afford it. I know i've had a row to myself on occasion, which was nice, but i'm a short legged average size individual who has plenty of room, and I would be happy to see others of taller or broader size enjoy the extra room instead if the seat assignment algorithm could be programmed to take that into account.
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,847 Member
    Quite a few airlines offer a reasonably-priced upgrade to "economy plus" (or various other names) (and/or early seating if non-reserved seats) for the few rows in coach with some extra room. I would hazard to guess that if these frequently sold out quickly, that they would consider spending the money to increase the number of those roomier rows.
  • rsclause
    rsclause Posts: 3,103 Member
    I was going to say that airlines should setup some wider seats and then I stopped myself. There called 1st class. Then I thought about how do you classify when someone is required to move and pay for larger seating? Weight, size? I can't imagine the amount of lying about size or weight to avoid the cost. Not trying to be mean here as I was 40 + pounds over weight for years but I did change my diet and took an active interest to correct a unhealthy lifestyle. I am often it the store and see what food choices some morbidly obese people are eating. I then see them place the items in an electric ride on shopping cart because their joints have worn out carrying the load.I am not shaming them, I just feel sad. Not only has the government, experts and family let them down but they lack the desire, discipline or education to help themselves.
  • solieco1
    solieco1 Posts: 1,559 Member
    edited July 2018
    Southwest has a very nice policy. If you don't feel you can fit in a seat without impinging someone else they will seat you free in two seats if available and you go ask the agent. This may require you to consciously fly at off-peak hours but is very fair. If you don't want the embarrassment of asking they will allow you to buy 2 seats and then will refund you one after the flight. This way they save it for you. If however, you don't fit and know it and choose to take someone else's area then it's just rude.

    I do wish they'd make some accommodation for height like this as well. I have twin sons who are currently 16 yo and 6'6. I always have to buy better seats for them.
  • solieco1
    solieco1 Posts: 1,559 Member
    edited July 2018
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Y'all have nothing to complain about until you fly Space Available on a poorly sound-insulated C-5 in which the sets are set in backwards and the plane makes three approaches to each airport before landing and then strands you in Alaska for three days (none of which was disclosed before boarding) :lol:

    However, it did only cost $10 so there's that.

    Been there done that but at least they gave me a pack of peanut butter crackers and a juice box.
  • happytree923
    happytree923 Posts: 464 Member
    Getting fat enough that I was almost spilling into the next seat on Christmas flights home was my wake-up call. I find deliberately overselling flights and forcing passengers off to be way more abhorrent than cramming as many seats on as possible so I will take the small, uncomfortable seat if it minimizes the former. However I am a short woman so I'm definitely not as impacted by the small space- last time I flew I sat next to a guy who was probably about 6'4" with a bulky build. He looked miserable and I could tell he was trying to keep out of my space as much as possible but there's only so much you can do.

    As far as people who are too overweight to fit, there really should be some system in place to make sure people who need two seats buy two but I don't know what that would look like and still be fair.
  • akp124
    akp124 Posts: 11 Member
    Whenever possible, I buy the two tickets next to each other so that the only people in the row are me and/or my family. I am always willing to pay extra for more comfort. You were not insensitive for your comment. As a fatty, I feel the same, I should conform to the standards, not the standards to me.
  • Courtscan2
    Courtscan2 Posts: 435 Member
    This thread has me dreading the 15 hour flight I'm hopping on tomorrow!!!
  • VUA21
    VUA21 Posts: 2,073 Member
    solieco1 wrote: »
    Southwest has a very nice policy. If you don't feel you can fit in a seat without impinging someone else they will seat you free in two seats if available and you go ask the agent. This may require you to consciously fly at off-peak hours but is very fair. If you don't want the embarrassment of asking they will allow you to buy 2 seats and then will refund you one after the flight. This way they save it for you. If however, you don't fit and know it and choose to take someone else's area then it's just rude.

    I do wish they'd make some accommodation for height like this as well. I have twin sons who are currently 16 yo and 6'6. I always have to buy better seats for them.

    The height issue I completely understand, that's not something we have any control over. And leg room is an issue.

    I agree, if you know good and well that you can't fit into a single seat yet only buy one seat and spill over into someone else's, that is very rude!
  • bdgfn
    bdgfn Posts: 7,719 Member
    I was obese, thankfully not to the point where I couldn't fit into an airline seat, but regular coach seats were uncomfortable. And when I flew on Southwest, I would see people pass by the empty seat next to me in order not to have to be wedged in next to me. I have lost a considerable amount of weight (gone from XXL sizes down to L) and am not worried about the flight from Europe to the US in a couple of weeks. Yes, I would like for seats to be slightly wider and a little more legroom. I do not like being crammed in like a sardine any more than the next person, even if I will be a bit less uncomfortable than I used to be.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 7,397 Member
    I'm not obese. Hey, my BMI is around 20, and I still think that most airline seats (in Europe) are very tight. Go figure.
  • middlehaitch
    middlehaitch Posts: 8,384 Member
    @Packerjohn, the people in the emergency exit seats are asked if they can perform the tasks required if there is an emergency, and are shown how to perform them. It is basically being able to open the door, strength or brute force required.
    The tasks can be opted out of. I have replaced someone opting out a couple of times over the years. (Don't know if it was voluntary or requested)

    Cheers, h.
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    @Packerjohn, the people in the emergency exit seats are asked if they can perform the tasks required if there is an emergency, and are shown how to perform them. It is basically being able to open the door, strength or brute force required.
    The tasks can be opted out of. I have replaced someone opting out a couple of times over the years. (Don't know if it was voluntary or requested)

    Cheers, h.

    My son said the people in the exit row said they could do it. However my son said one was a 5 ft something almost 300 pound woman. The other was an guy about the same size. My son was worked in the fitness industry and he could tell from their appearance they had little functional strength and would be a hindrance to someone actually trying to open the emergency exit.